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TSte 



^Jrz^^zz^ 




ALMANAC 



-AND- 



,,.^zi^^. 



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-FOR THE- 



SOUTHERN STATES. 



■? 



ESIGNED- 



To GIVE Directions for the Cultivation of Vegetables, 

AS PRACTICED IN THE SOUTH. 



Entered according to Act of Congress by Richard Fkotschek, in the Office of the Librarian at 
Washington, in the year 1877. 



Warehouse; 
15 & 17 DU MAINE STREET, 

NEAR THE FRENCH MARKET, 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 



GEO. MULLER, PRINTER, 50 BIENVILLE STREET. 
1889. 



INTRODUCTION. 



In presenting to my friends and patrons the 

Twelfth Annual Edition of my Almanac and Garden Manual, 

I have sincere pleasure in congratulating them upon the great advance 
made in that special branch of commerce, Vegetables for the Markets, in 
which we are mutually interested. 

Although I have exercised great care in the distribution of this work, 
desiring to place it only in the hands of those who practicall}^ benefit by 
its instructions, the inquiry for it has increased year by ye/ar, so that the 
supply has not equalled the demand; therefore, I shall publish of the 
present issue a still larger edition. 

The information contained in these pages is based upon the actual 
experience of many years, and its correctness and value are well attested 
by the success attained by those who have followed the instructions given. 

The many friendly and flattering encomiums bestowed upon my 
Almanac and Garden Manual, and the steady increase in my business 
are gratifying evidences that my efforts towards the development and 
improvement of this important branch of Southern industry have been 
appreciated. 

With assurances of my continued devotion to their interests, I tender 
to my patrons many thanks for their liberal favors in the past. 

Yours Very Truly, 

EICHARD FROTSCHER. 



EICHAED FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



SEEDS BY MAIL 



Seeds can be sent by mail to any part of the United States in packages not ex- 
ceeding four pounds, at eight cts. per i)ound, or one cent for two ounces, or fraction 
thereof. On seeds ordered in papers or by the ounce I prex)ay the postage, except 
on peas, beans and corn. This refers to large sized papers which are sold at one 
dollar per dozen. When ordered by the pound eight cents per pound postage has 
to be added to the price of the seeds ; to peas, beans and corn, fifteen cts. per quart. 

All packages are put up in the most careful manner, and every precaution 
taken to insure their reaching their destination in safety. Purchasers living at 
any place where my seeds are not sold, are requested to write to me to obtain their 
supplies. This will be more profitable than to buy from country stores where seeds 
left on commission, are often kept till all power of germination is destroyed. As 
seed merchants, who give their goods out on commission, rarely collect what is not 
sold, oftener than once every twelve or eighteen mouths, and as Lettuce, Spinach, 
Parsnip, Carrots, and many other seeds will either not sprout at all or grow imper- 
fectly if kept over a summer in the South— to buy and plant such, is but money, 
time and labor wasted. 

Here in our climate, where we plant garden vegetables as freely in autumn as in 
spring, and v^^here often the seeds have to be put in the ground when the weather 
is very warm, it is an indispensable necessity to have perfectly fresh seeds. 

My arrangements with my growers are made so that I receive the new crop, 
expressly cleaned for me, as soon as it is matured. The varieties which are not 
raised in the North, I order from Europe, and have tliem shipped so as to reach me 
about the beginning of August, just the time they are needed for fall planting. By 
following this plan I have always a full supply of fresh seeds of undoubted germi- 
nating qualities, while dealers, who sell on commission, have only those left from 
the winter previous. 

On the receipt of one dollar I will mail thirteen large size papers of seeds, put 
up the same as seeds sold by the pound. These papers can be selected from this 
Catalogue, and include four papers of either Beans or Peas, if so wanted. Or, for 
the same amount, I will mail twenty smaller papers, including four papers of 
either Peas or Beans. This is done to enable consumers to get reliable seeds in 
good size papers in places where my seeds are not sold. The papers put up by 
Northern seedsmen are so small that of some varieties they hardly contain enough 
to do any good. The low prices charged to merchants are made at the expense of 
consumers. My papers are large and worth the full value of the money paid for 
them. 

It cannot be too well impressed on the minds of all cultivators of vegetables, 
that seeds kept through a summer in this climate will not grow, and that all who 
use such seeds will be losers. 

All seeds that leave my establishment are thoroughly tested. 

Having received a great many complaints that letters which were addressed to 
me and contained money, were not answered, I must state that these letters never 
reached me, and, therefore, would caution my customers not to send any money 
in letters without registering same. By sending one dollar, or upwards, the cost, 
ten cents, can be charged to me. The cheai)est and surest way is money order or 
draft, but where they cannot be had, letters have to be registered, which can be 
done at any Post Office. 



fOR The sou'rHERiJ states. 



A Few Remarks on Raising Vegetables for Shipping. 



Within the past few years the raising of early vegetables for shipping West 
has become quite an item in the neighborhood of New Orleans. We have advan- 
tages here, which are not found elsewhere, for that branch of industry. Freights 
have been reduced to all points from here, and special cars, built expressly for 
carrying green vegetables and fruit, have been put on the Eailroads. We are ear- 
lier here than at any other point, and with the rich ground we have, and the large 
supply of manure to be had for the hauling only, early vegetables can be raised 
very successfully. 

Almost every kind of vegetables are shipped from here, but Beans, Cucumbers, 
Beets, Tomatoes, Cabbage and Peas form, the bulk of shipment. For Beans, the 
Dwarf Wax, Improved Valentine and "Best of AH" are principally planted for ship- 
ping purposes ; the latter carry well and find ready sale. The Wax varieties do 
well in a dry season, but in a wet one they are apt to spot, which makes them un- 
fit for shipping. If they have had a good season to grow, so they arrive in good or- 
der at destination, they will sell higher than any other variety. The Crease Back— 
a Pole Bean introduced here by nje— is well adapted for shipping. It is very early 
and will follow the Dwarf Beans closely in maturing. Thousands of bushels of 
green pods are shipped from here to the Western markets. They are generally sten- 
ciled "Mobile Beans," which name is wrongly applied. Very few of this variety 
are planted at that place. 

In the way of Cucumbers, the Improved White Spine and New Orleans Market 
are the best varieties, as they bear abundantly, keep their color better, and are su- 
perior for shipping to any other. I have been supplying the largest growers in 
that line with seed, the stock of which cannot be surpassed in quality. Of Beets 
only the dark red Blood Turnip or the Egyptian should be planted for shipping pur- 
poses. The Egyptian is a very quick growing variety, and should not be sown 
quite so early as the Blood Turnip, which ought to be sown in September and 
October ; for the former variety, January is time enough. 

For Tomatoes, the Extra Early Dwarf comes in bearing first, but should be 
planted only for the first crop, as when large varieties come in the market, the 
former do not sell as well. Great improvements have been made of late years in 
Tomatoes; the varieties raised and introduced by Livingston's Sons are perfect, 
and hardly any imj)rovement can be made on such varieties as the Paragon, 
Favorite, Acme and Beauty. New Orleans is not a good point to ship Tomatoes 
from as they hardly ever^arrive at destination in good condition. Along the Jack- 
son K. R., where the laud is more sandy, a better article is raised for shipping. 
Lettuce is shipped quite extensively ; the Imin'oved Passion-is used principally for 
that purpose. 

Potatoes and Onions are shipped in large quantities, but the former are very 
uncertain in regard to prices. Late shipped Onions generally pay better than those 
shipped too early. Owing to the unfavorable weather last winter and spring, the 
season has not been good for raisers and shippers of vegetables. The Winter Cab- 
bage which is mostly sold in this market brought good prices ; the crop was large, 
one of the best and finest that has ever been raised in this section. The Spring 
crop for shii)ping did not pay so well, except the shipments made early, mostly 
Brunswick. The Early Summer and Excelsior were later; the whole crop came in 
so late, that shipments had to be stopped, and the remainder of the crop sold here. 
We had rains almost every day during February and March, with cold weather, 
which retarded the growing crops of all kinds. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



The surest plan is to sow the seed in cold frames in November, say from the 
middle to the twentieth, to have them for transplanting in January. 

Beets and Cucumbers paid well, that is, the latter raised in frames ; the open 
ground crop was almost a failure. Peas did very poorly owing to the very heavy 
rains during March. Beans came in too late, and very few of them paid ; there 
came too many from along the line of the Jackson Bail Eoad to Chicago at the 
same time. Wax Beans did not arrive in good order, shipped from here, but have 
done finely from the line of the L. & N. B. B., between here and Mobile. The Wax 
Beans, when in gaod order, always bring higher prices than green podded varieties. 

The potatoes brought to the market early realized fancy prices ; most of them 
were shipped to different points from here ; but owing to their poor quality, having 
been mostly dug before properly matured, the returns were bad, and prices fell 
so rapidly, that our main crop sold at very low prices. The principal reason of it 
was, that our crop shipped North and West came in competition with the foreign 
potatoes,— New York alone received over one million sacks from England. The 
yield of potatoes was very different, one from the other; some hardly returned the 
seeds, while others got from 15 to 20 barrels for one planted, from the same lot of 
seed potatoes.— Tomatoes paid well. 

Along the line of the Jackson Bail Boad too many Peas were planted, and 
owing to the late season, they all matured almost at the same time ; the quantities 
shipped were too large to bring good prices. Owing to the rains and late frosts 
the quality was poor, and as they wilt quickly they were sold very low ; in some 
instances not bringing the freight. 

Gardeners and others who contemplate raising vegetables for shipping, are 
invited to give me a call. From the fact that all staple articles are raised for me 
by contract, in such sections best suited to mature the varieties we need for our cli- 
mate, and the interest I take in the seed business, coupled with a thorough knowl- 
edge of same, enables me to assist in making selections of seeds for the purpose. 
The interest of my customers and mine are identical. My stock is the best selected 
and largest in the South. 



I receive a good many letters which are plainly enough written, 
except the signature. To insure prompt filling of orders, I ask all cus- 
tomers and others writing to me, to write their names plainly; at the 
same time, never fail to give the name of the nearest Post Office. Also, 
write out the order in columns, not in the body of the letter. Some let- 
ters came in without any signature; when the Post Office was properly 
given, I returned the letter to the Post Master of that place, and in some 
instances have traced up the writer in that way. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



1st Month. 



JANUARY, 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tlie Soutl:\e^^ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

New Moon Id. 

First Quarter 8d. 

Full Moon 17d. 

Last Quarter 24d. 

New Moon 31d. 



3h. 


48 m. 


Evening. 


7h. 


20m. 


Evenin^^ 


12h. 


16m. 


Morning. 


lOh. 


87m. 


Forenoon. 


3h. 


49m. 


Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 



h. m 



Sun 

sets. 



Moon 
r. & 8, 

li. m. 



CHRONOLOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Tuesday 


7 9 


4 51 


sets 


Wednesday- 


7 8 


4 52 


6 8 


Thursday 


7 8 


4 52 


7 9 


Friday 


7 8 


4 52 


8 20 


Saturday 


7 7 


4 5y 


9 27 



Union of Ireland with Great Britain, 1801. 
Gen. Wolf born, Westerham, Kent, 1727. 
Eliot Warburton, Hist. Novelist, died 1852. 
Intr^tlilction of Silk manuf'es into Europe, 
Vigil of Epiphany. [1536. 



1) Sunday after New Year. 



Matth. 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 46m. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 7 


4 53 


10 42 


7 7 


4 53 


11 47 


7 6 


4 54 


morn 


7 6 


4 54 


12 10 


7 6 


4 54 


1 12 


7 5 


4 55 


1 42 


7 4 


4 56 


2 30 



Epipliany, or 12th day, old Christmas Day. 
Eobert Nicoll, poet, born, 1814. 
Battle of N. O,, 1815 & Inaug. Gov.Nicholls,'77 
Car. Lucr. Herschel, Astronomer, died, 1848. 
1st Steamboat, New Orleans from Pittsburg, 
First Lottery drawn in England, 1569. [1812. 
St. Arcadius, Martyr. 



2) 1st Sunday after Epiphany. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 54m. 



13 


Sunday 


7 3 


4 57 


3 24 


G. Fox, Founder Sect of Quakers, died, 1690 
"Great Frost" in England, began 1205. 


14 


Monday 


7 3 


4 57 


4 28 


15 


Tuesday 


7 2 


4 58 


5 27 


Thomas Crofton Croker, born, 1798. 


16 


Wednesday 


7 1 


4 59 


6 27 


Edmond Spencer, Poet, died, 1599. 


17 


Thursday 


7 


5 


rises 


Mozart, Musician, born, 1756. 


18 


Friday 


7 


5 


6 45 


Festival of St. Peter's Chair at Kome. 


19 


Saturday 


6 59 


5 1 


7 42 


James Watt, born, 1736. 



3) 2nd Sunday after Epiphany. 



John 2. 



Day's length, lOh. 4m. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 58 


5 2 


8 52 


6 58 


5 2 


9 56 


6 57 


5 3 


10 59 


6 56 


5 4 


11 59 


6 56 


5 4 


morn 


6 55 


5 5 


12 30 


6 54 


5 6 


1 2t 



Coldest day in the century, 1838. 
St. Agnes, Virgin Martyr, 304. 
Francis Bacon, born 1561. 
Thanksgiving for victory of 8th, 1815. 
Frederick the Great, born, 1712. 
St. Paul's Day. 
Louisiana seceded, 1861. 



4) 3rd Sunday after Epiphany. Matth. 



Day's length, lOh. 14m, 



Sunday 


6 53 


5 7 


2 18 


Monday 


6 52 


5 8 


3 14 


Tuesday 


6 51 


5 9 


4 10 


Wednesday 


6 50 


5 10 


5 8 


Thursday 


6 50 


5 10 


sets 



Admiral Lord Hood, died, 1816. 
Henry VIII, died, 1547. 
Emanuel de Swedenborg, born, 1688-89. 
King Charles I, beheaded, 1649. 
Ben. Johnston, born, 1574. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— January 3, Rosh Ghodesh Shebat, 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



2d Month. 



FEBRUARY, 



28 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl^e Soutl\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 7d. 

Full Moon 15d. 

Last Quarter 22d. 



3h. 38m. Evening. 
4h. 57m. Evening. 
6h. 5m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. & 8. 

h. m. 


CHRONOLOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 




1 
2 


Friday 6 49 
Saturday 6 49 


5 11 1 5 42 
5 11 i 7 48 


Washington elected Pres't, 1789. [mas Day 
Purification of the Blessed Virgin, Candle- 


5) 4th Sunday after Epiphany. 


' Matth. 8. Day's length, lOh. 24m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 48 


5 12 


8 49 


6 47 


5 13 


9 54 


6 46 


5 14 


10 49 


6 45 


5 15 


11 48 


6 44 


5 16 


morn 


6 43 


5 17 


12 18 


6 42 


5 18 


1 12 



Henry Cromwell, born, 1627. [gomery, 1861. 

Delegates from Conf. States meet at Mont- 

Ole Bull, born, 1810. 

Charles II, King of England, died, 186,5. 

Charles Dickens, born, 1812. 

Mary, Qaeen of Scots, beheaded, 1587. 

David Kezzio, murdered, 1565-66, 



6) 5th Sunday after Epiphany. 



Matth. 13. 



Day's length, lOh. 38m. 



10 
11 
12 
13 
11 
15 
16 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 41 


5 19 


2 6 


6 40 


5 20 


3 1 


6 39 


5 21 


3 57 


6 38 


5 22 


4 46 


6 37 


5 23 


5 42 


6 36 


5 24 


rises 


6 35 


5 25 


6 42 



Riot at Oxford, 1354. 

Mary, Queen of England, born, 1516. 

Abraham Lincoln, born, 1809. 

St. Gregory II, Pope, 631. 

St. Valentine's Day. 

Galilei Galileo, Astronomer, born, 1564. 

Dr. Kane, Am. Arctic Explorer, died, 1857. 



7) Septuagesima Sunday. 



Matth. 20. 



17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



Sunday 


6 34 


5 26 


7 50 


Monday 


6 33 


5 27 


8 50 


Tuesday 


6 32 


5 28 


9 46 


Wednesday 


6 31 


5 29 


10 59 


Thursday 


6 30 


5 30 


11 59 


Friday 


6 29 


5 31 


morn 


Saturday 


6 28 


5 32 


12 35 



Day's length, lOh, 52m. 



Columbia, S. C, burned, 1865. 

Pope Gregory V, died, 999. 

Eliz. Carter, classical scholar, died, 1806. 

U. Gaglian & T. Connor, felon poets, hanged 

Pierre du Bose, born, 1623. [1749. 

George Washington, born, 1732. 

Battle of Buena Vista, 1847. 



8) Sexagesima Sunday. 



Luke 8. 



Day's length, lOh. 6m. 



24 

25 
26 
27 
28 



Sunday 

Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 



6 27 


5 33 


1 30 


6 26 


5 34 


2 25 


6 25 


5 35 


3 20 


6 24 


5 36 


4 19 


6 23 


5 37 


5 17 



St. Matthias, Apostle. 
Dr. Bucan, born, 1729. 
Thomas Moore, poet, died, 1852. 
Longfellow, born, 1807. [1447. 

Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, murdered, 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— February 1, Eosh Chodesh xidar Eischon, 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



3d Month. 



MARCH 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tixe Soutl:\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHAc^KS. 

New Moon . . . .- Id. 

First Quarter 9d. 

I'ull Moon 17d. 

Last Quarter 'i-id. 

New Moon . . 31d. 



4h. 
12h. 
Gh. 
111. 
Gh. 



40m. Evening. 

39ra. Afternoon. 

27m. Morning. 

34m. Morning. 

17m. Morning^ 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 


Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 

r. & 8. 

h. m. 


CHROiSOIiOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 


1 
2 


Friday 
Saturday 


6 22 
6 21 


5 38 
5 39 


sets 
G 47 


First No. of the Spectator t^ublished, 1711. 
Territory of Dakota organized, 18G1. 


9) Quinquages 


ima Sunday. 


Luke 18. Day's length, llh. 22m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Satui-day 



6 19 


5 41 


7 4G 


6 17 


5 43 


8 53 


6 IG 


5 44 


9 56 


G 15 


5 45 


10 53 


G 14 


5 4G 


11 52 


6 13 


5 47 


morn 


G 11 


5 49 


12 36 



Edmond Waller, Poet, born, 1605. 
Abraham Lincoln inaugurated, 18G1. 
Mardi Oras in New Orleans. 
Great iBnancial excitement, 1863, 
Blanchard, Aeronaut, died, 1809. 
King William III, of England, died, 1702. 
William Cobbett born, 1762. 



10) 1st Sunday in Lent. 



Matth. 4. 



Day's length, llh. 40m. 



10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 10 


5 50 


1 2G 


6 9 


5 51 


2 15 


G 8 


5 52 


2 48 


G 7 


5 53 


3 50 


6 6 


5 54 


4 26 


6 5 


5 55 


5 12 


6 3 


5 57 


5 53 



The Forty Martyrs of St. Sebaste, 320. 

First daily paper, "Daily Courant." Br. 1702 

St. Gregory the Great, Pope, Go4. 

Disc'ry of planet Uranus, by Herschel, 1781 

Andrew Jackson, born, 1767. 

Julius Ca3sar, assassinated, B. C , 44, 

Prince Hohenlohe's miraculous cure's, 1823. 



11) 2nd Sunday in Lent. 



Matth. 15. 



Day's length, llh. 56m. 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 2 


5 58 


rises 


6 1 


5 59 


7 32 


6 


6 


8 43 


5 59 


6 1 


9 56 


5 58 


G 2 


10 58 


5 57 


G 3 


11 59 


5 56 


6 4 


morn 



St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland. 

Edward, King and Martyr, 978. 

St. Joseph's day. 

Vesta discovered, 1807. 

Louisiana ceded to :t'rance, 1800. 

*7. W. von Goethe, Germ. Poet, died, 1832 

Peter the Cruel, King of Castile, died, 1369. 



la) 3rd Sunday in Lent. 



Luke 11. 



Day^s length, 12h. 10m. 



24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 55 


6 5 


12 31 


5 54 


6 6 


1 28 


5 53 


6 7 


2 20 


5 52 


6 8 


3 20 


5 51 


6 9 


4 11 


5 50 


6 10 


5 7 


5 49 


6 11 


5 42 



Mahomet II, born, 1430. 

Annunoia,tion of the Blessed Virgin Mary 

Gov. WintliroM, died, 1640. 

Vera Cruz ea]){ured, 1847, 

Planet Palla>^, discoverd, 1802. 

Mrs. Fitzherbert, died, 1837. 

Dr. William Hunter, died, 1783. 



13) 4th Sunday in Lent. 



John 



31 I Sunday I 5 48 | 6 12 J 



Day's length, 12h. 24m. 



sets I Beethoven, died, 1827. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— March 2. Schekolira. 4. Kosh Chodesh Adar 

Scheni. 14. Zom Esther. 16. Parschorh Sochor. 17. Purim 

23. Parschoth Poroh. 30. Parschoth' Hachodesh, 



10 



EICHARD FKOTSCHER'^ ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



4tli Month. 



APRIL. 



30 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tlc\e Soutl:\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 8d. 

Full Moon . 15d. 

Last Quarter ... 22d. 

New Moon 29d. 



8h. 27m. Morning. 

4h. 58m. Evening. 

7h. 58m. Morning. 

8h. 44m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 



h. m. 



Moon 

r. k a. 



CHR0N01.0GY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT E VENTS. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 47 


6 13 


7 8 


5 4(5 


6 14 


7 58 


5 45 


6 15 


8 54 


5 44 


6 16 


9 48 


5 43 


6 17 


10 44 


5 42 


6 18 


11 40 



Earthquake at Melbourne, 1871. 
Jefferson, born, 1743. 
Washington Irving, born, 1783. 
Oliver Goldsmith, died, 1774. 
St. Irgernach, of Ireland, 550. 
Battle of Shiloh, 1862. 



14r) 5th Sunday in Lent. 



John 



Day's length, 12h. 38m. 



Suuday 


5 41 


6 19 


morn 


Monday 


5 40 


6 20 


12 30 


Tuesday 


5 39 


6 21 


1 33 


Wednesday 


5 38 


6 22 


2 21 


Thursday 


5 37 


6 23 


3 6 


Friday 


5 36 


6 21 


3 47 


Saturday 


5 35 


6 25 


4 26 



St. Francis Xavier, Missionary, born, 1506. 

Louisiana admitted to the Union, 1812. 

Gen. K. E. Lee surrendered 1865. 

St. Bade m us, Abbot Martyr, 376. 

Geo. Canning, born, 1770. jSumter. 

First gun of Civil War fired, 1861, at Fort 

Sydney Lady Morgan, died, 1859. 



5) Palm Sunday. 



Matth. 21. 



Day's length, 12h. 52m. 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 34 


6 26 


4 59 


5 33 


6 27 


rises 


5 32 


6 28 


7 37 


5 31 


6 29 


8 50 


5 30 


6 30 


10 2 


5 29 


6 31 


11 6 


5 28 


6 32 


morn 



Lincoln assassinated, 1865. 

Geo. Calvert. Lord Baltimore, died, 1632. 

Battle of CuUoden, 1746. 

Dr. Benjamin Franklin, died, 1790. 

Shakespeare born, 1564. 

Good Friday. 

E. Barton, "Maid of Kent," executed, 1534. 



16) Easter Sunday. 



Mark. 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 6m. 



21 


Sunday 


5 27 


6 33 


12 19 


Easter Sunday. 




22 


Monday 


5 26 


6 34 


1 9 


Madam De Stael, born 1766. 




23 


Tuesday 


5 25 


6 35 


1 58 


Shakespeare died, 1616, 
Oliver Cromwell, born, 1599. 




24 


Wednesday 


5 24 


6 36 


2 36 




25 


Thursday 


5 23 


6 37 


3 7 


St. Mark's Day. 




26 


Friday 


5 22 


6 38 


3 59 


David Hume, born, 1711. 




27 


Saturday 


5 21 


6 39 


4 20 


Sir Wm. Jones, Poet and Scholar, died, 


1794 



lY 1st Sunday after Easter. 



John 20. 



Day's length, 13h. 20m. 



28 
29 
30 



Sunday 

Monday 
Tuesday 



5 20 


6 40 


5 2 


5 18 


6 42 


sets 


5 17 


6 43 


7 25 



Monroe, born, 1758. 

King Edward IV, of England, born, 1141. 

Louisiana purchased from France by U. S. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. —5619.— 2. April, Eosh Chodesh Nisan. 
Hagodol. 15., Erev Pessach. 16.— 23., Pessach. 



13., Schaboth 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



11 



5th Month. 



MAY 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I-atitude of tl:\e Soutl:\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 8d. 

Full Moon 15d. 

Last Quarter 21d. 

New Moon 29d. 



12h. 


22m. 


Morning. 


Ih. 


22m. 


Morning. 


4li. 


33m. 


Evening. 


nil. 


59m. 


Forenoon. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


riaea. 


sets. 


r. &8. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


li. m. 


5 16 


6 44 


8 22 


5 15 


6 45 


9 19 


5 14 


6 46 


10 14 


5 14 


6 46 


11 16 



CHR01V0L.0GY 

— OF — 
IMPORTAIiT KrENTS. 



Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 



St. Philip and St. James, Apostles. 
William Camden, born, 1551. 
Discovery of the Holy Cross, by St. Helena. 
Dr. Isaac Barrow, Eng. divine, 'died, 1677. 



1§) 2d Sunday after Easter. 



John 10. 



Day's length, 13h. 34m. 



Sunday 

Mo u day 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 13 


6 47 


morn 


5 12 


6 48 


12 30 


5 11 


6 49 


1 10 


5 10 


6 50 


1 50 


5 10 


6 50 


2 32 


5 9 


6 51 


2 57 


5 8 


6 52 


3 31 



Emperor Justinian, born, 482. 
Humboldt, died, 1859. 
St. Benedict II, Poi)e, Confessor, 686. 
Stonewall Jackson, died, 1863. 
Battle of Spottsylvania, 1864. 
Pacific Railroad finished, 1869. 
Madame Ricamire, died, 1849. 



19) 3d Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 46m. 



12 


Sunday 


5 7 


6 53 


4 3 


St. Pancras, Martyi-, 304. 




13 


Monday 


5 6 


6 54 


4 49 


Jamestown, Va., settled, 1607. 




14 


Tuesday 


5 5 


6 55 


5 4 


Battle of Crown Point, 1575. 




15 


Wednesday 


5 5 


6 55 


rises 


St. Isidore, died, 1170. 




16 


Thursday 


5 4 


6 56 


8 52 


Sir William Petty, born, 1623. 




17 


Friday 


5 3 


6 57 


9 50 


J. Jay, died, 1829. 




18 


Saturday 


5 2 


6 58 


10 49 


Napoleon I, elected Emperor, 1804. 





20) 4th Sunday after Easter. 



John. 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 56m. 



19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 2 


6 58 


11 42 


5 1 


6 59 


morn 


5 1 


6 59 


12 35 


5 


7 


1 11 


4 59 


7 1 


1 43 


4 58 


7 2 


2 9 


4 58 


7 2 


2 39 



St. Dunstan, Archbishop of Canterbury, ' 

Hawthorn, died, 1864. 

Columbus, died, 1506. 

Title of Baronet tirst conferred, 1611. 

Napoleon I, crowned King of Italy, 1805. 

Bishop Jewell, born, 1522. 

Battle of Winchester, 1864. 



21) 5th Sunday after Easter. 



John 16. 



Day's length, 14h. 6m. 



26 


Sunday 


4 57 


7 3 


3 14 


Fort Erie captured, 1813. 


27 


Monday 


4 57 


7 3 


3 44 


Dante, poet, born, 1265. 


28 


Tuesday 


4 56 


7 4 


4 39 


Noah Webster, died, 1843. 


29 


Wednesday 


4 56 


7- 4 


sets. 


Paris burned, 1871. 


30 


Thursday 


4 55 


7 5 


8 10 


Ascension Day. 


31 


Friday 


4 55 


7 5 


9 4 


Joan of Arc burned, 1431. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649— May 1. and 2., Rosh Chodesh lyar. 
19., Lag Beomer. 31., Rosh Chodesh Siwan. 



12 



KICHARD FKOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARI)EN MANUAL 



6tli Month. 



JUNE, 



30 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl:\e Soutl:\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter • . • 6d. 

Full Moon 13d. 

Last Quarter 20d. 

>i ew Moon • • ■ 28d. 



2h. 41m. Afternoon. 

8h. 38m. Forenoon. 

2h. 15m. Morning. 

3h. 33m, Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Weel: 




CHRONOL.OGT 



IJlPORTAyi EVEXTS. 



1 i Saturday 



4 54: : 7 6 1 10 11 



Battle of Seven Pines. 1862. 



22) 6th Sunday afrer Easter, 



John li 



Day's length, Uh. 12m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 54 


7 6 


lU 40 , 


4 53 


7 7 


11 14 


4 58 


7 7 


11 47 


4 52 


7 8 


morn 


4 52 


7 8 


12 32 ! 


4 51 


7 9 


1 6i 


4 51 


7 9 


1 40 ' 



Battle of Cold Harbor. 18C4. 

S. A. Douglas died, 1861. 

Lord E. Dudley marr'd A. Robsart, 1550. 

J. Pradier, Sculptor, died, 1852. 

Surrender of Memphis, Tenn., 1862. 

First American Congress at New York, 176." 

Emperor Xero, died, 68, Eome. 



23 j Whit Sunday 



John 14. 



Day's length, 14h. 18m, 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tutsday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 51 


7 9 


2 9 


4 51 


7 9 


2 4M 


4 50 


7 10 


3 11 


4 50 


7 10 


3 52 1 


4 50 


7 10 


rises 


4 50 


7 10 


8 46 


4 50 


7 10 


9 44 



Charles Dickens, died, 1870. 

Battle or Bi.u- Bethel. 1861. 

Sir John iranklin, died, 1847. 

Harriet Martineau. Novelist, born, 1802. 

General Scott, born, 1786. 

St. Basil the Great, 379. 

Magna Charter, 1215. 



24} Trinity Sunday. 



John 3. 



Day's length, 14h. 20m. 



16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
9.0. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



, 4 50 


■7 10 


10 33 


4 50 


7 10 


11 12 


4 49 


7 11 


11 45 


4 49 


7 11 


morn i 


4 49 


7 11 


12 20 


4 48 


7 12 


12 58 


4 49 


7 11 


i 30 



Edward I. of England, born, 1239. 

Battle of Bunker Hill, 1775. 

War declared against Great Britain, 1812. 

Kearsage sunk the Alabama, 1864. 

Corpus Christi. 

Anthony Collins, born, 167-6. 

Napoleon I, abdicated, 1815. 



•25) 1st Sunday after Trinity. Luke 16. 



Day's length, 14h. 22ra. 



23 j 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 49 


. 7 11 


1 59 


4 49 


7 11 


2 31 


4 50 


7 10 


2 59 


4 50 


7 10 


3 20 


4 50 


7 10 


3 47 


4 50 


7 10 


sets 


4 50 


7 10 


8 31 , 



Battle of Solferino, 1859. 
Nativity of St. John the Baptist. 
Battle of Bannochburn. 
Dr. Phili}) Doddridge, born, 1702. 
John Murray. Publisher, died, 1843. 
Queen Victoria, crowned, 183S. 
St. Peter the Apostle, 68. 



!6) 2d Sunday after Trinity 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, 14h. 20m. 



30 



Sunday I 4 50 I 7 10 | 9 12 i Bishop Gavin Dunbar, died, 1547. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. 



5649.— June 5. and 6., Schebuoth. 
Chodesh Tamus. 



29. and 30., Kosh 



FOR THE SOUTHEKN STATES. 



13 



th Month. 



JULY. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl^e Soutlr(err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter , . , 6d. 12h. 

Full Moon 12d. 3h. 

Last Quarter .. . 19d. 2h. 

New Moon 27d. 6h. 



38m. Afternoon. 
41m. Evening. 
24m. Evening. 
52m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 



Sun 



h. m. 



Moon 

r. & s. 

h. m. 



CHROlVOLiOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT E VENTS. 



Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 50 


7 10 


. 9 48 


4 51 


7 9 


10 22 


4 51 


7 9 


10 54 


4 51 


7 9 


11 24 


4 51 


7 9 


morn 


4 52 


7 8' 


2 10 



Battle of Malvern Hill, 1862. 

Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

Qaebec founded, 1608. 

Independence of the United States, 1776. 

Queen Magdalen of Scotland, died, 1537. 

Th. More, Chancel, of Eng. beheaded, 1535. 



27j 3d Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 16m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Dog days begin. 

John de la Fontaine, born, 1621. 

Zachary Taylor, died, 1850. 

John Calvin, theologian, born, 1509, 

J. Q. Adams, born, 1767. 

Eobt. Stevenson, engineer, etc., died, 1850. 

Pope, John III, died, 573. 



4 52 


7 8 


12 47 


4 52 


,7 8 


1 14 


4 53 


7 7 


1 47 


4 53 


7 7 


2 40 


4 54 


7 6 


3 30 


4 54 


7 6 


rises 


4 55 


7 5 


8 22 



28) 4th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 6, 



Day's length, 14h. 8m. 



14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



4 56 


7 4 


9 7 


4 56 


7 4 


9 43 


4 57 


7 3 


10 19 


4 57 


7 3 


10 42 


4 58 


7 2 


11 14 


4 59 


7 1 


11 45 


4 59 


7 1 


morn 



John Hunter, eminent surgeon, born, 1728. 

St. Swithin's Day. 

Great riot in New York city, 1863. 

Dr. Isaac Watts, born, 1647. 

St. Symphorosia and 7 sons, Martyrs, 120. 

St. Vincent de Paul, confessor, 1660. 

Confed. Congress at Kichmond, 1861. 



29) 5th Sunday after Trinity. 



Luke 15. 



Day's length, 14h. 00m. 



21 


Sunday 


5 


7 


12 27 


Battle of Bull Run, 1861. 


22 


Monday 


5 1 


6 59 


12 56 


Urania discovered, 1824. 


23 


Tuesday 


5 1 


6 59 


1 37 


First Olympiad, 776, B. C. 


24 


Wednesday 


5 2 


6 58 


2 30 


Curran, born, 1750. 


25 


Thursday 


5 2 


6 58 


2 59 


St. James the Great. 


26 


Friday 


5 3 


6 57 


3 58 


Flood at Pittsburg, 1874. 


27 


Saturday 


5 4 


6 56 


sets 


Atlantic cable laid, 1866. 



30) 6th Sunday after Trinity. 



Matth. 5. 



Day's length, 13h. 52m. 



28 


Sunday 


5 4 


6 56 


7 56 


Battle before Atlanta, Ga., 1864. 


29 


Monday 


5 5 


6 5^ 


8 36 


Albert I, Emp. of Germany, born, 1289. 


30 


Tuesday 


5 6 


6 54 


9 


Westfield Explosion, N. Y. Harbor, 1871. 


31 


Wednesday • 


•fr-7 


6 5-3 


9 30 


St. Ignatius Loyola, died, 1556. " 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— July 16., Zom Tamus. 29., Eosh Chodesh Ab. 



14 



EICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Sth Month. 



AUGUST. 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl:\e Souttierrv States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 4d. 

Full Moon lOd. 

Last Quarter 18d. 

New Moon 26d. 



8h. 6ra. Forenoon, 

llh. 22m. Evening. 

5h. 31m. Morning. 

8h. 40m. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 
rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 
sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 
r. & e. 

ti. m. 


5 7 
5 8 
5 9 


6 53 
6 52 
6 51 


9 58 
10 34 
10 58 



CHRONOIiOGY 

— OF— 
TMPitRTANT EVENTS. 



Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Harriet Lee, Novelist, died, 1851. 
Mehemed Ali, Pasha of Egypt, died, 1849. 
Crown Point taken, 1759. 



31) 7th Sunday after Trinity 



Mark. 



Day's length. 13h. 4<im. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 10 


6 50 


11 30 1 


5 11 


6 49 


morn 


5 12 


6 48 


12 32 


5 13 


6 47 


1 47 


5 14 


6 46 


2 51 


5 15 


6 45 


3 59 


5 16 


6 44 


rises 



John Banim, Irish Novelist, died, 1842. 
First Atlantic Cable landed, 1858. 
Transflgiu-ation of our Lord. 
Leonidas, Spartan Hero, slain 480, B. C. 
Fr. Hutcheson, Moral Phil., born, 1694. 
Isaac, ^yaiton, born, 1593. 
Battle of Weisenburg, 1870. 



32) 8th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 7. 



Day's length, 13h. 26m. 



11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 



Sunday 


5 17 


6 43 


7 40 


Monday 


5 18 


6 42 


8 12 


Tuesday 


5 19 


6 41 


8 40 


Wednesday 


5 19 


6 41 


9 10 


Thursday 


5 20 


6 40 


9 30 


Friday 


5 21 


6 39 


10 10 


Saturday 


5 22 


6 38 


10 40 



Yiscount Rowland Hill, born, 1772. 

Pope Gregory IX, died, 1241. 

Earthquake in Scotland, 1816. 

G. Coleman, the elder, Dramatist, died, 1794. 

Ascension of the Blessed Virgin Mary. 

Battle of Bennington, 1777. 

Frederick the Great, died, 1786. 



33) 9th Sunday after Trinity 



Luke 16. 



Day's length, 13h. 14m. 



18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Sunday 


5 23 


6 37 


11 18 


Monday 


5 24 


6 36 


11 48 


Tuesday 


5 25 


6 35 


morn 


Wednesday 


5 28 


6 34 


12 29 


Thursday 


5 27 


6 33 


1 19 


Friday 


5 28 


6 32 


1 40 


Saturday 


5 29 


6 31 


2 36 



John Earl Eussell, born, 1792. 

Dog days end. 

Eobert Herrick, English Poet, born, 1591. 

Lady Mary Wortley Montague, died, 1762. 

Dr. F. J. Gall, founder of phrenology, died, 

Wallace, beheaded, 1305. [1828. 

St. Bartholomew, Apostle. 



34) 10th Sundav after Triaitv. Luke 19. 



Day's length, 13h. 00m. 



2o 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 30 


6 30 


3 54 


5 31 


6 29 


sets 


5 32 


6 28 


7 48 


5 33 


6 27 


8 18 


5 34 


6 26 


8 48 


5 35 


6 25 


9 4 


' 5 36 


6 24 


9 35 



25th or 27th, Landing of Caesar in England, 

Sir Rob. Walpole born, 1676. [55 B. C. 

Battle of Long Island, 1776. 

Leigh Hunt, died, 1859. 

John Locke, Philosopher, born, 1632. 

Union defeat at Richmond, Ky. 

John Bunvan, died, 1683. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— August 6., Tischobeab. 10., Schaboth Nachmu. 
12., Chamischo Osor. 27. and 28., Rosh Chodesh Elul. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



15 



9th Month. 



SEPTEMBER. 



30 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl^e Soutl:\err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter 2d. 2h. 14ra. Afternoon. 

Full Moon 9d. 8h. 32m. Forenoon. 

Last Quarter: 16d. llh. 28m. Evening. 

I^ew Moon 24d. 9h. 21m. Evening. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week 




CHROIVOliOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



35) nth Sunday after Trinity. Luke 18. 



Day's length, 12h. 46m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



5 37 


6 23 


10 8 


5 38 


6 22 


10 53 


5 40 


6 20 


11 47 


5 42 


G 18 


morn 


5 43 


6 17 


12 55 


5 44 


6 16 


2 3 


5 45 


6 15 


3 4 



Napoleon III, captured at Sedan, 1870. 
Great fire in London, 1666. 
Cromwell died, 1658. 
Pindar, Lyric poet, 518, B. C. 
Confederates entered Maryland, 1862. 
Geo. Alex. Stevens, writer, died, 1784. 
Independence of Brazil, 1822. ^ 



36) 12th Sunday after Trinity. 



Mark 7. 



Day's length, 12h. 28m. 



Sunday 


5 46' 


6 14 


4 14 


Monday 


5 47 


6 13 


rises 


Tuesday 


5 48 


6 12 


7 21 


Wednesday 


5 50 


6 10 


7 45 


Thursday 


5 51 


6 9 


8 15 


Friday 


5 52 


6 8 


8 41 


Saturday 


5 53 


6 7 


9 15 



Nativity of the Blessed Virgin. 

James IV, of Scotland, killed, 1513. 

Mungo Park, African Traveler, born, 1771. 

James Thomson, poet, born, 1700. 

St. Guy, Confessor, 11th century. 

Sir Wra. Cecil, Lord Burleigh, born, 1520. 

Uprising of the People of New Orleans against the usurping government. 



37) 13th Sunday after Trinity. Luke 10. 



Day's length, 12h. 12m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 



21 Saturday 



5 54 


6 6 


9 51 


5 55 


6 5 


10 33 


5 56 


6 4 


11 25 


5 57 


6 3 


morn 


5 58 


6 2 


12 24 


5 58 


6 2 


1 24 


5 59 


6 1 


2 31 



Capture Harper's Ferry by St'll Jackson, '62. 

Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit, died, 1736. 

Battle of Antietam, 1862. 

Gilbert Bishop Burnet, historian, born, 1643. 

First Battle of Paris, 1870. 

Alexander the Great, born, 356, B. C. 

St. Matthew, Apostle and Evangelist. 



38) 14th Sunday after Trinity. - Luke 17. 



Day's length, 12h. 00m. 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 


6 


3 39 


6 1 


5 59 


4 51 


6 2 


5 58 


sets 


6 3 


5 57 


6 48 


6 4 


5 56 


7 26 


6 5 


5 55 


7 59 


6 6 


5 54 


8 38 



Beginning of Autumn. 

Wm. Upcott, M^nusc. CoUec, died, 1845. 

Pepin, King of France, 768. 

Pacific Ocean discovered, 1513. 

Saints Cyprian and Justina, Martyrs 

Strassburg fell, 1870. 

Sir Wm. Jones, Oriental Scholar, born 



304. 



1746. 



39) 15th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 6. 



Day's length, llh. 46m. 



29 
30 



Sunday 

Monday 



6 7 
6 8 



5 53 
5 52 



9 19 
10 10 



Michaelmas Day. 
Yorktown invested, 1781. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts.— 5649.— Sept. 22., Maschkimim Lislichos. 26. and 27., 
Kosh Haschonoh. '5650. 28., Schaboth Teschuvoh. 29., Zom Gedaljah. 



16 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



10th Month. 



OCTOBER 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the Latitude of tl:\e Soutl\err\ States. 

MOON'S PHASES. 

First Quarter Id. 8h. 13m. Evening. 

Full Moon .-: 8d. 8h. 5m. Evening. 

Last Quarter 16d. 7h. 17m. Evening. 

New Moon 24:d. 9h. 5m. Morning. 

First Quarter . . .-. 31d. 3h. 10m. Morning. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Sun 


Sun 


Moon 


rises. 


sets. 


r. &s. 


h. m. 


h. m. 


h.. m. 


6 9 


5 51 


11 6 


6 10 


5 50 


morn 


6 11 


5 49 


12 7 


6 12 


5 48 


1 14 


6 U 


5 46 


2 24 



CHRONOLiOGY 

—OF — 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Fulton's first Steamboat trip, 1807. 
Andre executed as a spy, 1780. 
Black Hawk, died, 1838. 
Battle of Germantown, 1777. 
Horace Wali3ole, born, 1717. 



40) 16th Sunday after Trinity, 



Luke 7. 



Day's length, llh. 30m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 15 


5 45 


3 30 


6 16 


5 44 


4 44 


6 17 


5 43 


rises 


6 18 


5 42 


6 45 


6 19 


5 41 


7 16 


6 20 


5 40 


7 46 


6 21 


5 39 


8 22 



Jenny Lind, born, 1820. 

Margaret, Maid of Norway, died, 1290. 

Battle of Perry ville, Ky., 1882. 

Great fire in Chicago, 1871. 

Benjamin West, Painter, born, 1738. 

America discovered, 1492. 

•St. Wilfrid, Bishop of York, 709. 



41) 17th Sunday after Trinity 



Luke 14. 



Day's length, llh. 14m. 



13. 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



Battle of Queenstown, 1812. 

Battle of Jena, 1806. 

Virgil, Latin Poet, born, 70 B. C. 

Marie Antoinette beheaded, 1793. 

Burgoyne surrendered, 1777. 

Last State Lottery drawn in England, 1826. 

Cornwallis surrendered, 1781. 



6 23 


5 37 


8 59 


6 24 


5 36 


9 40 


6 25 


5 35 


10 32 


6 26 


5 34 


31 32 


6 27 


5 33 


morn 


6 28 


5 82 


12 18 


6 29 


5 31 


1 23 



42) 18th Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 22. 



Day's length, llh. 00m. 



20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 30 


5 30 


2 32 


6 31 


5 29 


3 35 


6 32 


5 28 


4 38 


6 33 


5 27 


5 48 


6 34 


5 26 


sets. 


6 35 


5 25 


6 48 


6 36 


5 24 


7 26 



M. Dahl, Swed. Portrait Painter, died, 1743. 

Battle of Trafalgar, 1805. 

Charles Martel, died, 741. 

Dr. John Jortin, Critic, born, 1698. 

Daniel Webster, died, 1852. 

Dr. James Beattie, Poet, born, 1735. 

Hogarth, died, 1765. 



43) 19th Sunday after Trinity, 



Matth. 9. 



Day's length, lOh. 46m. 



27 

28 
29 
30 
31 



Sunday 

Monday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 



6 37 


5 23 


8 14 


6 38 


5 22 


9 10 


6 39 


5 21 


10 15 


6 40 


5 20 


11 14 


6 41 


5 19 


morn 



Cuba discovered, 1492. 

Battle at White Plains, 1776. 

Surrender of Metz, 1870. 

Solomon's Temple dedicated, 1004 B. C. 

All Hallow Eve. 



•Je^rsh-Festivalsand Pasts.— 5t550. —October 5., Yom Kippur. 10. and 11 The 

. First days of Suckoth. 12., Choi Hamoeid.. 16., Hoschano Rabo. 17., Schemini 

Azereth. 18., Sirachoth Tora.h. 25. and 26., Rosh Chodesh Marcheschwan 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



17 



11th Month. 



NOVEMBER. 



30 Days. 



GalculciLed for the Latitude of tt\e Soutl:^err\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 7d. lOh. 

Last Quarter 15d. 3h. 

New Moon 22d. 8h. 

First Quarter 29d. 12h. 



45m. Morning. 
15m. Morning. 
20m. Evening. 
8m. Afternoon. 



DAY 

OF 

Month and Week. 



Friday 
Saturday 



Sun 

rises. 

h. m. 


Sun 

sets. 

h. m. 


Moon 

r, & s. 

h. m. 


6 42 
6 43 


5 18 
5 17 


12 40 

1 40 



CHROJSOIiOGY 

— OF— 

IMPORTANT EVENTS. 



All Saints Day. 
All Souls Day. 



414) 2'Jth Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 22. 



Day's length, lOh. 32m. 



Sunday 


6 44 


5 16 


2 18 


Monday 


6 45 


5 15 


3 39 


Tuesday 


6 45 


5 15 


4 40 


Wednesday 


6 46 


5 14 


5 41 


Thursday 


6 47 


5 13 


rises 


Friday 


6 48 


5 12 


5 59 


Saturday 


6 49 


5 11 


6 58 



Malachy, Archbishop of Armagh, 1148. 

George Peabody, died, 1869. 

The American 74 launched, 1782. 

Battle of Port Eoyal, 1861. 

John Kyrle, "The Man of Ross," died 1724. 

Oortez entered Mexico, 1519, 

Great fire in Boston, 1872. 



45) 21st Sunday after Trinity 



John 4. 



Day's length, lOh. 20m. 



Sunday 


50 


5 10 


7 45 


Monday 


6 51 


5 9 


8 20 


Tuesday 


6 52 


5 8 


9 18 


V/ednesday 


6 53 


5 7 


10 12 


Thursday 


6 54 


5 6 


11 10 


Friday 


6 54 


5 6 


morn 


Saturday 


6 55 


5 5 


12 25 



Mahomet, Arabian Prophet, born, 570. 

Mortinmas. 

Sherman left Atlanta, 1864. 

French entered Vienna, 1805. 

Sir Chas. Lyell, Geologist, born, 1797. 

John Kepi)ier, great Astronomer, died, 1630. 

Tiberius, Roman Emperor, born, 42 B. C. 



46) 22nd Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 18. 



Day's length, lOh. 8m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



6 56 


5 4 


1 26 


6 57 


5 3 


2 30 


6 57 


5 3 


3 31 


6 58 


5 2 


4 32 


6 59 


5 1 


5 31 


7 


5 


sets 


7 1 


4 49 


6 10 



Suez Canal opened 1869. 

Fort Lee taken by the British, 1776. 

St. Elizabeth of Hungary, Widow, 1231. 

Thomas Chatterton, Poet, born, 1752. 

Presentation of the Blessed Virgin. 

Professor Dugald Stewart, born, 1753. 

Th. Henderson, Prof, of Astron., died, 1844, 



4^} 123rd Sunday after Trinity. Matth. 22. 



Day's length, 9h. 38m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesdfiy 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 1 


4 49 


6 54 


7 2 


4 48 


7 51 


7 2 


4 48 


8 49 


7 3 


4 47 


9 47 


7 3 


4 47 


10 47 


7 3 


4 47 


11 44 


7 4 


4 46 


morn 



Battle of Lookout Mountain, 1863. 

Evacuation of New York, 1783. 

John Elwes, noted Miser, died, 1789. 

Steam Printing, 1814. 

Washington L'ving, died, 1859. 

Sir Philip Sidney, Poet, born, 1554. 

U. S. took possession of Louisiana, 1803. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts. -5650.— 24. November, Rosh Chodesh Kislev. 



18 



BICHARD FKOTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



12th Month. 



DECEMBER 



31 Days. 



Calculated for the I-atitude of tl:\e SoutI:\eri:\ States. 



MOON'S PHASES. 

Full Moon 7d. 4h. 

Last Quarter 15d, 9h. 

New Moou 22d. 7h. 

First Quarter 29d. llh. 



32ni. Morning. 
38m. Morning-. 
32m. Morning. 
56ra. Evening-. 



DAY 

OF 

Montli and Week. 




Sun 
sets. 

h. m. 



Moon 
r. & s. 

h. m. 



CHROXOLiOGY 

— OF — 
r.lf ROR TA i\ T E TEXTS. 



48) 1st Sunday in Advent, 



Matth. 21. 



Day's length, 9h, 50m. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 5 


i 55 


12 20 


7 6 


4 54 


1 21 


7 6 


4 54 


2 22 i 


7 7 


4 53 


3 28 1 


7 7 


4 53 


4 32 


7 7 


4 53 


5 36 


7 8 


4 52 


rises 



Princess A. Comnena, Historian, born, 1083. 

Heruan Cortez. died. 1547. 

Eobert Bloomfleld, Poet, horu. 1776. 

Pope John XXII, died, 1334. 

Carlyle, born, 1795. 

St. Nicholas, Archbishop of Myra, 342. 

Cicero, Koman orator, assassinated. 43 B. C. 



49) 2d Sunday in Advent. 



Luke 21. 



Day's length, 9h. 44ni. 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



9 
9 
9 
9 
7 10 



4 52 


5 59 


4 52 


6 41 


4 51 


7 38 


4 51 


8 34 


4 51 


9 32 


4 51 


10 29 


4 50 


11 32 



Immaculate Conception of Blessed Virgin. 

Milton, born, 1608. 

Louis Napoleon, elected President, 1848. 

Louis, Prince of Conde. died 1686. 

St. Columba, Abbot in Ireland, 584. 

Battle of Fredericksburg, 1862. 

Washington, died, 1799. 



50) 3d Sunday in Advent. 



Matth. 11. 



Day's length, 9h. 40m. 



15 

16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 10 


4 50 


morn 


7 10 


4 50 


12 2 


7 li) 


4 50 


1 21 


7 11 


4 49 


2 30 1 


7 11 


4 49 


3 40 


7 11 


4 49 


4 50 


7 12 


4 48 


5 58 



David Don, Botanist, died, 1841. 

Great Fire in New York, 1835. 

Ludw. Beethoven, eniiu. comp., born, 1770. 

St. Winebald. Abbot and Confessor, 760. 

Capt. W. Ed. Parry, Arct. Nav.. born, 1790. 

Secession ord. passed in S. Carolina, 1860. 

St. Thomas, Apostle. 



51) 4th Sunday in Advent. 



John 1. 



Day's length, 9h. 38m. 



22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 



Sunday 

Monday 

Tuesday 

Wednesday 

Thursday 

Friday 

Saturday 



7 11 


4 49 


sets. 


7 11 


4 49 


6 9 


7 11 


4 49 


7 20 


7 11 


4 49 


8 30 


7 10 


4 50 


9 40 


7 10 


4 50 


10 45 


7 10 


4 50 


11 54 



Emp. Yitellius, beheaded at Eome, 69 A, D. 

Newton, born, 1642. 

Treaty of Ghent, 1814. 

Nativity of our Lord. Christmas Day. 

Battle of Trenton, 1776. 

St. John, Apostle and Evangelist. 

Macauley, died, 1859. 



52) Sunday after Christmas. 



Luke 2. 



Day's length, 9h. 42m. 



Sunday 

Mondaj' 
Tuesdaj' 



7 9 


4 51 


morn 


7 9 


4 51 . 


12 39 


7 9 


4 51 


1 37 



Union repulsed at Vicksburg, Miss., 1862. 
Titus, Roman Emperor, born, 41 A. D. 
Battle of Murfreesboro, 1862. 



Jewish Festivals and Fasts,— 5650.— December 1! 
23. cind 24., Bosh Chodesh Thebet. 



Chanukah. 



1 




lONG GRCEN WHITE! S 




^^T^ ^P^^^M 







•r^'JNi^W)CK CA3BAGE 



Tuest''-ft 



.>«; 



O ^a T>v-,-r,n( 



2 30 




FR0TCHER5 SUPERIOR lATL FLAT DUTCH CABBAGE 



LOUISIANA OR CREOLE ONION 




EGYPTIAN EARLY ■ RED TURNIP BEET 



LARGE FLAi 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 19 



THE VEGETABLE GARDEN. 



The size depends upon the purposes for which it is intended ; whether the 
family is large or small, and the time which can be devoted to its cultivation. The 
most suitable soil for a garden is a light loam. When the soil is too heavy, it 
ought to be made light by applying stable manure, and working up the ground 
thoroughly. Trenching as done in Europe, or North, is not advisable, at least 
where there is any cocoa, as by trenching the roots of this pest will get so deeply 
incorporated with the soil that trouble will be met with afterwards to get rid of it. 
Exposure towards the east is desirable. If there are one or more large trees in 
the garden, or on the immediate outside, their shade can be used in which to sow 
Celery, Cabbage and other seeds during the hot summer months, which will be an 
advantage. The seed beds for this purpose should be so arranged as to receive only 
the morning or evening sun. It is of the greatest importance that the ground 
should be well drained, otherwise it will be impossible to raise good vegetables. 
The most reliable manure for general purposes is well decomposed stable or barn- 
yard manure. Cow manure will suit best for light, sandy soil, and horse manure 
for heavy, stiff clay lands. For special purposes, Peruvian Guano, Blood Ferti- 
lizer, Raw Bone, Cotton Seed Meal and other commercial manures may be em- 
ployed with advantage. Of late years most gardeners who work their land with a 
plow, use Cow peas as a fertilizer with excellent result. They are sown broad-cast 
at the rate of 14 bushels to the acre, and when large enough thej^ are turned under. 
Where the land is very sandy, cotton seed meal has the most lasting effect. For 
quick growing crops, such as Melons, Cucumbers, etc., the Blood Fertilizer and 
(xuano applied in the hills are very good. Soap suds are good for Celery; it is as- 
tonishing to perceive the difference in the size of those stalks which are watered 
every few days with the suds, and others on the same ground which are not. Wood 
ashes are best for Peas, either used as a top dressing v/hen the Peas just come out 
of the ground, or else sprinkled in the rows when planted. The New Orleans mar- 
ket gardeners raise as fine vegetables as can be produced anywhere ; in fact, some 
varieties cannot be excelled, and very few gardeners use anything but stable 
manure. 

Rotafion of Crops is another iinportant item. Beets, Carrots and other 
roots should not be grown in succession on the same ground, but should be changed 
to those which grow above ground, such as Lettuce, Beans, Peas, etc. Good seed, 
good ground and good cultivation are essential in order to raise good vegetables. 
When plants are up, the ground should be stirred frequently ; weeds ought not to 
be suffered to go into seed, but should be destroyed as soon as they appear. Hoe- 
ing and working the young crops during dry weather is very beneficial, because the 
weeds are then easily killed, arrd hoeing the ground will make it retain moisture 
better than if it were left alone. 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 










THE HOT BED. 



Owing to the open winters in the South, hot beds are not so much used as in 
the North, except to raise such tender plants as Egg-Plants, Tomatoes and Pep- 
pers. There is little forcing of vegetables done here, except as regards Cucumbers 
and Lettuce ; and, if we do not have any hard frosts, the latter does better in the 
oi3en ground than under glass. To make a hot bed is a very simple thing. lAny 
one who has the use of tools can make the wooden frame ; the sashes may be ob- 
tained from any sash factory. I consider a wooden frame from five to six feet wide 
and ten feet six inches long a very good size. It should be at least six inches higher 
at the back than in the front, and covered by three sashes 3|x5 feet. The manure 
ought not to be over one month old ; it should be thrown together in a heap, and 
when commencing to heat, be worked over with a fork, and all the long and short 
manure evenly mixed. In this State the ground is generally low, and to retain the 
heat of the manure for a longer time it is best to put the manure on top of the 
ground— that is, make a bank two feet longer and two feet wider than the frame. 
Keep the edges straight and the corners firm ; when thrown up about eighteen inches 
trample the manure down to six or eight inches, then put on another layer of eigh- 
teen inches and trample down again ; place thereon the frame and sash, and fill in 
six inches of good earth. After about five days stir the ground to kill the weeds 
which may have come up, then sow the seeds. In lower Louisiana the ground is 
too wet to dig out eighteen inches deep, throw in the manure and trample down as 
recommended in the North; by a few hard rains, such as we frequently have in 
winter, the manure would become so soaked beneath the ground that the heat 
would be gone. Another advantage, when the frame is put above the ground, is, 
that it will go down with the manure gradually, and there remains always the same 
space between the glass and the ground. If the ground is dug out and the manure 
put into the frame, the ground will sink down so low, after a short time, that the sun 
will have little effect upon it, and plants will beoonie spindly. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATeS. 21 



SOWING SEEDS. 



Some seeds are sown at once where they are to remain and mature. Others 
are sown in seed beds and transplanted afterwards. Seeds shf»uld be covered ac- 
cording to their sizes, a covering of earth twice the size of the seed is about the max- 
imum. Some seeds, such as Beans, Corn and Peas, can be covered from one to two 
inches, and they will come up well. Here is a difference again : Wrinkled Peas 
and Sugar Corn have to be covered lighter and more carefully than marrowfat 
Peas or the common varieties of Corn. It depends upon the nature of the soil, sea- 
son of the year, etc. For instance, in heavy wet soils seeds have to be covered 
lighter than in sandy light ground. Seeds which are sown during summer in the 
open ground, such as Beets and Carrots, should be soaked over night in water and 
rolled in ashes or plaster before sowing; they will come up quicker. When they 
are sown in a seed bed, the ground should be light enough not to bake after a 
rain. Some varieties of seeds require shade when sown during the summer, such 
as Cauliflower, Celery and Lettuce. Care should be taken to have the shade at 
least three feet from the ground, and shade only after the sun has been on the bed 
for two or three hours ; and remove again early in the afternoon, so the plants may 
become sturdy. If too much shaded they will be drawn up, long-legged, and not 
fit to be set out in the open ground. The most successful cabbage planters in this 
neighborhood sow their seeds in the open ground, towards the end of July and dur- 
ing August, and give them no shade but water, and keep the ground moist from 
the day of sowing till the plants are transplanted. Seeds should be sown thinly 
in the seed bed. If plants come up too thickly they are apt to damp off. 

Lettuce seed should be sprouted during the hot months before sowing, accord- 
ing to directions given for June. 

To sow Turnips on a large scale during late summer and early fall months, the 
ground should be prepared in advance, and the seed sown just before or during a 
rain. Small pieces of ground, of course, can be sown at any time and watered 
afterwards. For covering all kinds of seeds, a fork is preferable to a rake; with 
either implement, care must be taken not to cover the seeds too deep. Beans, Peas 
and Corn are covered with the hoe. Some fine seeds, such as Thyme or Tobacco, 
are covered enough when pressed with the back of the spade to the ground. The 
seedsman is often blamed for selling seeds which have not come up, when the 
same are perfectly good, but, perhaps, through ignorance the party by whom they 
were sown, i)laced them too deep or too shallow in the ground, or the ground may 
have been just moist enough to swell the seeds, and they failed to come up. At 
other times washing rains after sowing beat the ground and form a crust that the 
seeds are not able to penetrate, or, if there is too much fresh manure in the ground, 
it will burn the seed, and destroy its vitality. 

When seeds, such as Beans, Cucumbers, Melons and Squash, are planted before 
it is warm enough, they are very apt to rot if it rains. 



22 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Seeds requisite to produce a given number of Plants and sow a given 

amount of ground, 



Quantity 
per acre. 

Artichoke, 1 oz. to 500 plants 3^2 lb. 

Asparagus, 1 oz. to 200 plants 5 lbs. 

Barley ... 2Ubu. 

Beans, dwarf, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill. . . lU " 

Beans, pole, 1 quart to 200 hills 3^ " 

Beet, garden, 1 oz. to 100 feet of drill 10 lbs. 

Beet, Mangel, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill 6 " 

Broccoli, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 

Broom Corn. ' 10 lbs. 

Brussels Sprouts, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 

Buckwheat i^bu. 



*Cabbage, I oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 

Carrot, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 23^ lbs 

*Cauliflower, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants 5 oz. 

*Celery, 1 oz. to 10,000 plants 4 " 

Clover, Alsike and White Dutch — 6 lbs 

" Lucerne, Large Red & Crimson 

Trefoil 8 lbs. 

" Medium 10 lbs. 

*Collards, 1 oz. to 2,500 plants 6 oz. 

Corn, sweet, 1 quart to 500 hills . . . 8 qts. 

Cress, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill ... 8 lbs. 

Cucumber, 1 oz. to 80 hills . . . ... 1^4 " 

Egg Plant, 1 oz. to 2,000 plants 3 oz 

Endive, 1 oz. to 300 feet of drill — .3 lbs. 

Flax, broadcast. . }4^^- 

Gourd, 1 oz. to 25 hills 23/^lbs 

Grass, lilue Kentucky 2 bu. 

" Blue English 1 '• 

" Hungarian and Millet. V^ " 

'• Mixed Lawn. .. 3 " 

" Orchard, Perennial Rye, Red Top, 

Fowl Meadow and Wood Meadow 2 " 
* The above calculations are made for sowing in the 
double the quantity to give the same amount of plants. 



Quantity 
per acre. 

Garlic, bulbs, 1 lb. to 10 feet of drill 

Hemp 

Kale, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants, 

Kohl-Rabi, 1 oz. to 200 feet of drill. . . 

Leek, I oz. to 250 feet of drill 

Lettuce, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 3 

Melon, Musk, 1 oz. to 100 hills, 1% 



3^bu. 
4 oz. 

IHlbs. 



Melon, Water, i oz. to 25 hills 
Nasturtium. 1 oz. to 50 feet of drill , . . 

Oats. .. 

Okra, 1 oz. to 50 feet of drill 

Onion Seed, 1 oz to 200 feet of drill . 

" " for Sets 

Onion Sets, 1 quart to 20 feet of drill. 

Parsnip, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 5 

Parsley, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 8 

Peas, garden, 1 quart to 150 feet of drill. ]V- 

" field 21^ " 

Pepper, 1 oz. to 1,500 plants 4 oz. 



11 
10' " 
2H bu. 
10 lbs. 

4 " 
30 '• 

8 bu. 
lbs. 



bu. 



Potatoes, 

Pumpkin, 1 quart to 300 hills 

Radish, 1 oz. to 150 feet of drill ... 

Rye ... 

Salsify, 1 oz. to 60 feet of drill 

Spinach, i oz. to 150 feet of drill 

Summer Savory, 1 oz, to 500 feet of drill . 
Squash, summer, 1 oz. to 40 hills 

winter, 1 oz. to 10 hills 

Tomato, 1 oz. to 3,000 plants. 

Tobacco, 1 oz. to 5,000 plants 

Turnip, 1 oz. to 250 feet of drill 

Vetches 

Wheat ... 



10 bu. 

4 qts, 

8 lbs. 
' H t)u . 

8 lbs. 
10 " 
2 '• 



oz. 



3 

3 

2 
. VA lbs 

2 bu 
1 to J " 



spring; during the summer it requires 



Number of Plants or Trees to the Acre at given distances. 

Dis, apart. No. Plants. I Dis. apart. No. Plants 
174,240 3 feet by 3 feet, 



^4 foot. 

1 " 

1}4 feet 

2 " ,.., 

2}^ " 

8 teet by 1 foot.. 

3 " 2 feet.. 



43,560 
19,360 
10,890 

6,969 
14,5.'0 

7,260 



1 foot. 

2 feet 



4,840 
10,888 
5,444 
3,629 
'2,722 
1,742 



Dis. apart. 

6 feet 

7 " . . . . 

8 " . 


No. Plants. 
1,210 

889 

680 


Dis. apart. 

12 feet 

15 " 

18 " . 


No. Plants. 

302 

193 

134 


9 " 


573 


20 " 


108 


10 " . . . . 


4.35 
360 


25 "... 


. . . 69 


11 " 


30 " 


49 



Standard Weight of Various Articles, 



Apples 

" dried 

Barley . 

Beans 

Buckwheat 

Broom Corn, ... 

Blue Grass, Kentucky 

" " English 

Bran , 

Canary Seed ,_ 

Castor Beans ' . . 

Clover Seed 

Corn, shelled 

" on ear .. • 

Corn Meal 

Charcoal 

* Coal, Mineral 

Cranberries 

Dried Peaches 

Flax .^eed , . . 

Hemp Seed 

Hungarian Grass Seed 

Irish Potatoes, heaping measure 

Millet 

Malt 

Oats 

Osage Orange. 

Orchard Grass 



per bush. 



48 lbs. 

22 " 

48 " 

60 " 

48 " 

46 " 

14 " 

'24: '• 

20 " 

60 " 

46 " 

60 " 

56 " 

70 " 

50 " 

22 " 

80 " 

40 " 

28 " 

56 " 

44 " 

48 " 

60 " 

50 " 

38 " 

32 " 

33 " 
14 " 



Onions 

Peas, ,.. 

Plastering Hair 

Rape 

Rye 

Red Top Seed 

Salt, Coarse. 

Salt, Michigan 

Sweet Potatoes 

Timothy Seed 

Turnips 

Wheat 

Beef and Pork, per bbl. 
Flour, per bbl., net — 



.per bush. 54 lbs. 



net 



50 
56 
14 
50 
56 
56 
45 
58 
60 

200 

.... 196 

White Fish and Trout, per bbl., net. 200 

Salt, per bbl 

Lime, " 

Hay, well settled, per cubic foot. , 

Corn, on cob, in bin " 

" shelled " 

Wheat, 

Oats, 

Potatoes, " " 

Sand, dry, " 

Clay, compact, " 

Marble, " 

Seasoned Beech Wood, per cord,., 
Hickory, " 



280 
, 220 

22 

45 
48 
25^2 

. 95 

1.35 

109 
.5,616 
6,960 



FOR 1:he southern states. 



23 



DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGDE Of VEGETABLE SEEDS. 

ARTICHOKE. 

Artichaut (Fr.) Artischoke (G.) 
Alcachofa (Sp.) 
Larg^e Oa'eeii Olobe. This 
is a very popular vegetable in 
the South, and much esteemed 
by the native as well as the for- 
eign population from the South 
of Europe. It is extensively cul- 
tivated for the New Orleans 
market. It is best propagated 
from suckers which come up 
around the large plants. Take 
them off during" the fall and 
early winter months ; plant them 
four feet apart each way. Every 
fall the ground should be man- 
ured and spaded or plowed be- 
tween them ; at the same time 
the suckers should be taken off. 
If planted by seed, sow them 
in drills during winter or early 
spring, three inches apart and 
one foot from row to row ; cover 
with about one-half inch of 
earth. The following fall the 
plants can be transplanted and 
cultivated as recommended 
above. The seeds I offer are im- 
ported by me from Italy, and of 
superior quality ; I can also fur- 
nish sprouts or plants in the 
fall of the year, at $1.50 per 100. 

£ai'ly CaEBspaiBia. An 

early variety imported by me 

from Italy and which fruited for 

the first time three years ago. The cut represents as it grows, and has been taken 

from a branch brought to me ; it is flatter at the base than the Globe ; it is very 

early, but has not proven itself as hardy as the foregoing kind. 




Eaily Campania. 



ASPARAGUS. 

AsPERGE (Fr.), Spargel (Ger.), Esparagos (Sp.) 

Purple Top. The Asparagus is not extensively cultivated in the South ; not 
that it is not liked well enough, but from the fact that it does not succeed as well 
as in more Northern latitudes. It seems that it is short-lived, the roots giving out 
soon or throwing up very small shoots. 



'24 HICHAED FROTSCHER's ALMAXAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



The ground should be well manured and prepared before either the roots or 
seeds are planted. For this climate the sowing of seed is preferable. Eoots are 
generally imported from the Xorth, and I have found that the roots raised here, 
one year old, are as strong as those received from the Xorth three years old. Plant 
the seed in early spring. Soak over night in water ; plant in rows, or rather hills, 
one foot apart and two feet between ; put from four to five seeds in each hill ; when 
well up thin out to two plants. The following winter, when the stalks are cut off, 
cover with a heavy coat of well rotted manure and a sprinkling of salt ; iishbrine 
will answer the same purpose. In the spring fork in the manure between the rows, 
and keep clean of weeds. The same treatment should be repeated every year. 
The bed should not be cut before being three years established. Care must be 
taken not to cut the stalks too soon in the fall of the year — not until we have had 
a frost. If cut before, it will cause the roots to throw up young slioots. which will 
weaken them. 

BUSH BEANS. 

CULTURE. 

Place in rows eighteen inches apart; drop a bean every two or three inches. 
Plant from end of February, and for succession, every two or three weeks to May. 
Bush Beans planted in this latitude during June and July, will not produce much. 
August and September are good months in which to plant again ; they will pro- 
duce abundantly till killed by the frost. Do not cover the seeds more than two 
inches. 

POLE BEANS. 

Lima Beans should not be planted before the ground has become warm in 
spring. Strong poles ought to be set in the ground from four to sis feet apart, and 
the ground drawn around them before the seed is planted. It is always best to 
plant after a rain and with the eye of the bean down. The other varieties can be 
planted flat, and not more than three to four feet apart, and hilled after they are 
up. Do not cover the seeds more than two inches; one inch is enough for the 
Southern Prolific and Crease Back. 

BEANS. 

.DWAEF, SXAP or BUSH-. 
Haricot iFr.i, Bohne i.Ger.), Frljolenano iSp.) 

Extj^a Early Sir Weeks, or yeiclngtoii Bed Speckled Fre}ich. 

Wonder. Early China Bed-Eye. 

Early Valentine Bed Speckled, I Bed Kidney. 

Early ITohaick Sir Weeks. Dwarf Golden War. 

Early Yellow Sir Weeks. \ Best of All. 

German Dwarf War. ' Improved Valentine. 

White Kidney. WardwelVs Xew Dwarf Kidney Waj'. 

Extra Early Six T^'eeks, or >'e\v- It is used to a large extent for the mar- 

iug-ton Wonder. Is very early, but ket for the first planting; ver^- produc- 

the pods are small and round. Good for tive. 

family use. Early Yellow Six l^'eeks. This 

Early Valentine, one of the best is the most popular sort among market 
varieties; pods round, tender and quite gardeners. Pods flat and long; a very 
productive; not much planted for the good bearer, but not so good for ship- 
market. Excellent for shipping. ' ping as the Mohawk or Valentine. 

Early .lloliawk Six weeks. This Oeruian Dwarf T^'ax. A good va- 

is a long podded variety, and very hardy. riety which is unsurpassed as a snap 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



25 



bean. Pods are of a wax color and have 
no strings ; quite pro(iuctive. Has come 
into general cultivation ; cannot be too 
highly recommended. 

White KicliBey. A good strong 
growing variety, not much planted. 

Reel Speckled Frencli is another 
strong growing variety, planted a good 
deal for the New Orleans market as a 
second crop, being about ten days later 
than the Mohawk and yellow Six Weeks. 
It is hardy and i)roduGtive. 

Early China Red-Eye. Early and 
of good quality, but not very popular. 

Red Kidney. This variety is largely 
planted for the New Orleans market. 
It is a coarse growing variety, and much 
used for shelling when the pods turn 
yellow, so that the beans are well devel- 
oj)ed, but yet soft. 

Dwarf Croldeii Wax. A dwarf 
variety with flat pods, longer than the 
Dwarf German Wax ; entirely stringless 




and white, mottled with purplish red. 
This variety will come into general cul- 
tivation, and will in time take the place 
of the black seeded Wax, being earlier 
and more in-oductive. 

Best of All. A new variety from 
Germany of great merit, introduced 
here by me. It is green podded, long 
and succulent ; it is y)rolific and well fla- 
vored. An excellent variety for shipping 
and family use. It is not quite so early 
as the Mohawk, but is of superior quality 
for shipping, and, therefore, is almost 



Dwarf Goldeu Wax Beau. 




Bci=L0l VllBc 11 



26 



illdHARI) FTvOTSdaER's ALMANAC AND GAPLDEN MANUAL 




the only kind planted 
here for that purpose. 
The cut is a good rep- 
r e s e n t a t i o n as it 
grows; it shows only 
two-thirds of its natu- 
ral size. Can not be too 
highly recommended. 
I expect to have a full 
supply this year. 

Improved Valeii- 
tiiics This variety has 
all the good qualities 
of the old Valentine; 
only, it is ten days ear- 
lier, a great considera- 
tion when planted for 
the market ; it will su- 
persede the old varie- 
ty of Valentine. 

WardweSi's i\ew 
Dwarf I£ 3 d n e y 
"W^ax. This kind was 
introduced two years 
ago. It is the best 
dw^arf Wax Bean in 
cultivation ; it is quite 
early ; the pods are of 
similar shape as the 
GoldenWax, but long- 
er ; color of a beautiful golden yellow. They are very prolific and hardy, surpass- 
ing any other Dv/arf Wax Bean that I know^ of. The color of the bean is somewhat 
like the Golden Wax, but more kidney-shaped and more spotted vvith dark purple. 
It has done best here among the Dwarf Wax Beans. Of all the many new kinds 
I have trier], I found none to excel it. 



Improved Valentine. 




WARDWELLS DWAR 





FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



27 



BEANS. 

POLE OR BUNNINCt. 

Haricots a Eames (Fr.), Stangen-Bohnen (G-er.), Frijol Vastago (Sp.). 

Southern Prolific. 

Crease Back. 

New Golden Wax Flageolet. 



Large Lima. 
Carolina or Sewee. 
Horticultural or Wren's Egg 
Dutch Case Knife. 
German Wax or Butter. 



Lazy Wife's. 

Souther )i Willow-leaved Sewee or Butter. 



Lar^e Lima. A well-known and excellent variety. It is the best shell bean 
known. Should have rich ground, and plenty room to grow. 

Carolina or Sewee. A variety similar to the Lima ; the only difference is, the 
seeds and pods are smaller. It is generally culti- 
vated, being more productive than the Large 
Lima. 

Hortieuitural or Wresn's Esfgr, does not 
grow very strong; bears well, pods about six 
inches long, which are roundish and very tender. 

Dutch Case Knife. A very good pole bean ; 
it is early ; pods broad and long, somewhat 
turned towards the end. 

German l¥ax. This is a fine variety, and 
has the same good qualities as the German Dwarf 
Wax. Pods have a waxy appearance ; very suc- 
culent and tender. 

Soutiiern Prolific. No variety will continue 
longer in bearing than this. It stands the heat of 
the summer better than any other, and is planted 
to succeed the other kinds. It is a very strong 
grower; pods about seven inches long and flat; 
seeds are dark yellow or rather light brown. It is 
the standard variety for the New Orleans market, 
for late spring and summer. 

Crease Back. A variety of Pole Beans which 
has been cultivated in the South for a long time, 
but has never come into the trade till introduced 
by me. It is an excellent bean, earlier than the 
"Southern Prolific." Seeds white; pods round, 
with a crease in the back, from which the name. 
It is a good grower, bears abundantly, and, if 
shipped, will keep better than most other kinds. It 
sells better in the spring than any other for ship- 
ping purposes; and when in season, it can not be 
surpassed. For early summer, the Southern Pro- 
lific is preferable, standing the heat better. 
Several years ago I received half a bushel from 
near Mobile, Ala., and all the beans of this variety 
about here can be traced back to that half bushel. 
I supplied two growers in Georgia where it was 
not known at that time. I expect to have a 
full supply this season. There is a light brown 
bean, streaked and mottled with dark brown and white Crease Back Beans. 




28 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



black of the same name ; but it is not equal to the white 
variety. In some localities this kind is called "Calico Crease 
Back." The white seeded variety is also- known in some 
sections by the name of "Fat Horse." 

Naw €roideii l^ax Flageolet. This variety was in- 
troduced two years ago ; it was brou^'ht out from Germany. 
After another year's experience I can confirm all what is 
claimed for it. It is the best Wax Pole Bean in cultivation, 
surpasses in length and delicacy of flavor all other Wax 

varieties. It is a very 
strong grower, which is 
wanting by most of the 
Wax Pole kinds. It bears 
abundantly, is entirely 
stringless, and does not 
spot, even by too much 
rain or other untoward 
weather. Cannot be too 
highly recommended. 
The Golden Wax Pole 
Bean, brought out last 
year, I have dropped, as 
it can stand no compari- 
son with the Golden Wax 
Flageolet. 

i.azy Wife's. A new 
Pole Bean from Penn- 
sylvania. The pods are 
entirely stringless, 4—5 
inches long, and have a 
fine flavor when cooked. 
They retain their rich 
flavor until nearly ripe. 
The Beans are white, and 
as fine as a shell Bean. 

§outhei'ifi Willow- 
leaved Sewee or But- 
ter. This is a variety 
which is grown by the 
market gardeners about 
New Orleans ; the pods and beans are the same as the Sewee or Carolina Bean ; it 
is quite distinct in the leaves, being narrow like the willow. It stands the heat 
better than any other Butter Bean, and is very productive. Try it. 





New Golden Wax Flageolet 
Pole Beaus 



Lazy Wife's Pole Beans. 



ENGLISH BEANS. 

Feve de Marais (Fr.)> Puff-Bohne, (Ger.), Haba Comun (Sp.). 



Broad llViaidsor. Not so much cul- 
tivated here as in some parts of Europe. 
It is much liked by the people of the 
Southern pare of Europe. Ought to be 



planted during November ; as, if planted 
in the spring, they will not produce 
much. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



29 



BEETS. 

BetraveKFi.), Runkelruebe (Ger.), Remolacha (Sp.). 



Extra Earhj or Bas^ano. 
Simon's Early Red Tuniip. 
Early Blood Turnip. 
Long Blood. 
Half Long Blood. 
Egyptian Red Turnip. 



Long Red Mangel Warzel. 
White French Sugar. 
Silver or Swi^i> Chard. 
Eclipse. 
I^entz Beet. 



CULTURE. 

The^ground for beets should be ri(;h and well spaded or plowed. Sow in drills 
twelve to eighteen inches apart, cover the seed about one inch deep. When about 
a month old, thin them out to four or six inches apart. In this latitude beets are 
sown from January till the end of April, and from the middle of July till the middle 
of November ; in fact, some market gardeners sow them every month in the year. 
In the summer and fall, it is well to soak the seeds over night and roll in plaster 
before sowing. 



£xtm Early, or Bassaaio, is the 

earliest variety, but not popular on ac- 
count of its color, which is almost white 
when boiled. Earliness is not of so 
much value here, where there are beets 
sown and brought to the market the 
whole year around. In the North it is 
different, where the first crop of beets 
in the market in spring will bring a bet- 
ter price than the varieties which ma- 
ture later. 

Simon's Early Ked Turnip. 
This is earlier than the Blood Turnip, 
sniooth skin and of light red color ; 
planted^a good deal by the market gar- 
deners about New Orleans. 

Early^Blood ^Turnip. The most 
popular variety for market purposes as 



well as family use. It is of a dark red 
color and very tender. This is the prin- 
cipal variety planted for shipping. My 
stock is raised for me from dark selected 
roots, and can not be excelled. 

Eong- Blood. Is not quite so tender 
as the foregoing variety ; it is not planted 
at all for the market, and very little 
for family use. In the North it is 
chiefly planted for winter use ; here we 
have Turnip Beets the whole winter 
from the garden ; therefore it has not 
the same value. 

Half Eong- Blood. A very dark 
red variety of a half long shape ; a good 
kind for family use. 

Eg-yptian Red Tnraiip. This is 
a new variety sent out by "Benary" 




Simon's Early Red Turnip Beet. Silver Beet or Swiss Chard. 



Early Blood Turnip Beet. 



30 



HICIiVRD FBOTSCHER S ALMA.NAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



some years ago. It is very early, tender, 
deep red and of Turnip shape. Leaves 
of this variety are smaller than of 
others. The seeds are also much smaller. 
I recommend it and consider it a good 
acquisition. The seed of this variety is 
obtained by me from the original source 
and is the finest stock offered. 



Eclipse. A new Beet from Germany, 
very regular, of globular shape. It has 
a small top, is of dark red blood color, 
sweet and fine grained flesh. It comes 
as early as the Egyptian. 




Lclipse Beet 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



31 



Long^ Red Maii§j;:cl l¥inzeS. This 
is raised for stock ; it grows to a large 
size. Here in the South where stock is 
not stabled during tlie winter, the rais- 
ing of root crops is much neglected. 
Being very profitable for its food it 
ought to be more cultivated. 

White Freiieli Stii^r^B', is used the 
same as the foregoing; not much 
planted. 

Silver Beet, or Swiss CSsard. 
This variety is cultivated for its large 
succulent leaves, which are used for the 
same purposes as Spinach. It is very 
popular in the New Orleans market. 

?^eiitz Beet. This new strain of 
Blood Turnip Beet originated with one 



of the most prominent market gardeners 
around Philadelphia. This beet, as 
selected and grown by him, has had a 
great reputation, in the surroundings of 
the above place, but the seed has been 
carefully guarded and kept until re- 
cently, when it fell into the hands of a 
seed grower, from whom I have received 
my supply. It is fully as early as the 
Egyptian Beet, but larger and of better 
quality; it has a fine turnip form with 
smooth roots, dark blood red flesh, 
tender and sweet at all times, never be- 
coming tough and stringy, even when 
old. The cut is an exact representation 
of its shape. Give it a trial.' 



BORECOLE, OR CURLED KALE. 

Chou-vert (Fr.), Gruner Kohl (Ger. \ Breton (Sp.). 

I>warf Crcmiaai CJreeiis. 

A vegetable highly esteemed in the Northern part of Europe, but very little 
cultivated in this country. It requires frost to make it good for the table. Treated 
the same as cabbage. 



BROCCOLI. 

Chou Brocoli (Fr.), Spargel-Kohl (Ger.), Broculi (Sp.). 
PurpJe Cape. 

Kesembles the Cauliflower, but not forming such 
compact heads, and not quite so white, being of a 
greenish cast. We raise such fine Cauliflower here 
that very little Broccoli is planted. 

The Purple Cape is the most desirable variety ; 
cuhivated the same as Half Early Cauliflowei"; fur- 
ther North than New Orleans, where Cauliflower 
does not succeed, the Broccoli may be substituted, 
being hardier. 



BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 

Chou de Bruxelles (Fr.), Eosen or Sprossen Kohl 
(Ger.\ Breton de Bruselas iSp.). 

A vegetable cultivated the same as the Cabbage, 
but very little known here. The small heads which 
appear along the upper part of the stalk between 
the leaves, make a fine dish when well prepared. 
Should be sown during August and September. 




Brussels Sprouts. 



32 BICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 

CABBAGE. 

Chou Pomme (Fr.), Kopfkohl (Ger.), Kepollo (Sp.). 



Early York. 
Early Large Yorl\ 
Early Sugar Loaf. 
Early Large Oxheart. 
Early Wbiningstadt. 
Jersey Wakefield. 
Early Flat Dutch. 
Early Drumhead. 
Large Flat Brunswick. 



Lmproved Early Summer. 

Lmproved Large Late Drumhead. 

Fr^otscher's Superior Late Flat Dutch. 

Red Dutch (for pickling). 

Green Globe Savoy. 

Early Divarf Savoy. 

Drumhead Savoy. 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil. 

Excelsior. 



During the past "World's Exposition" I exhibited different vegetables as they 
were in season. Many visitors will recollect the fine specimens of Cabbage, Beets, 
Celery, Cauliflower, Lettuce, Cucumbers, etc., they saw there displayed. I received 
the Prize for '^Frotsclier's Flat Dutch Cabbage'' and Early Blood Turnip 
Beets. Ten heads of Cabbage, devoid of all outside leaves, weighed one hundred 
and seventy-three pounds. They were raised on Captain Marcy's place, one mile 
below Algiers. — I did not exhibit them for competition, but merely to show to our 
Northern visitors what fine vegetables we have here during the winter, when at 
their homes everything is covered with snow and ice. The Committee of Awards 
on Vegetables gave me the Prize without any solicitation on my part, — they think- 
ing it well merited. (See inside cover.) 

CULTURE. 

Cabbage requires a strong, good soil, and should be heavily manured. To raise 
large Cabbage without good soil and without working the plants well, is an im- 
possibility. Cabbage is sown here almost in every month of the year, but the seed 
for a main crop should be sown from July to September. Some sow earlier, but 
July is time enough. For a succession, seed can be sown till November. The main 
crop for Spring should be sown from end of October to end of November, as stated 
before. The raising of Cabbage for spring has become quite an item of late years ; 
Brunswick should be sown a little earlier than the Early Summer or the Excelsior, 
—the two latter kinds not till November, but in a frame, so the young plants can 
be protected against cold weather, which we generally have between December 
and January. After the middle of January, setting out can be commenced with. 
These early varieties of Cabbage require special fertilizing to have them large. 
Early varieties are sown during winter and early spring. Cabbage is a very impor- 
tant crop, and one of the best paying for the market gardener. It requires more 
work and attention than most peoi)le are willing to give, to raise cabbage plants 
during the months of July and August. I have found, by careful observation, that 
plants raised in August are the surest to head here. The most successful gardeners 
in raising cabbage plants sow the seeds thinly in seed beds, and water several times 
during the day; in fact, the seed-bed is never allowed to get dry from the sowing 
of the seed till large enough to transplant. There is no danger, in doing this, of 
scalding the plants, as many would sui)pose ; but on the contrary, the plants thrive 
well, and so treated, will be less liable to be attacked by the cabbage-flies, as they 
are too often disturbed during the day. Tobacco stems chopped up and scattered 
between the plants and in the walks between the beds, are a preventative against 
the fly. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



Early York. This is an earl 5^ va- 
riety, but very little grown here except 
for family use. As we have cabbage 
heading up almost the whole year, it 
has not the same value as in Northern 
climates, where the first cabbage in 
spring brings a good price. 

L.arg-c York. About two to three 
weeks later than the above, forming 
hard heads; not grown for the market. 
Eecom mended for family use. 

Early Sug-ar Eoaf. Another point- 
ed variety, with spoon-shaped leaves; 
sown in early spring for an early sum- 
mer cabbage. 

Early Earg:e OxBieart. An excel- 
lent variety, which is later than the 
Large York, and well adapted for sow- 
ing in fall or early spring. 

Early TYiniiiiig^stadt. This is a 
very fine solid-heading variety ; pointed 
and of good size, of the same season as 
the Oxheart. It is very good for family 
use. It does not suit the market, as 
no pointed cabbage can be sold to any 
advantage in the New Orleans market. 
Jersey ^Vakefield. Yery popular 
in the North; but little planted here. 
It is of medium size and heads up well. 
Early Flat Dutch. An intermediate 
variety between the early pointed and 
late varieties. It is not, on an average, 
as heavy as the Oxheart or Winning- 
stadt; but, if raised for the market, more 
salable on account of being flat. Very 
good variety for family use. 

Early Draoinlieacl. A similar va- 
riety to the above ; a little earlier, and 
not making as many leaves, it can be 
planted close. A good early spring 
cabbage. 

Earge Flat Brunswick. This is 
a late German variety, introduced by 
me over twenty years ago. It is an 
excellent variety, and when well headed 
up the shape of it is a true type of a 
Premium Flat Dutch Cabbage. It re- 
quires very rich ground if sown for win- 
ter crop, and should be sown early, as it 
is a little more susceptible of frost than-. 
the Superior Flat Dutch. It is well 
adapted for shipping, being very hard, 
and does not wilt so quick as others. At 



Frenier, along the Jackson R. R. this is 
the kind principally planted, and is pre- 
ferred over all other varieties. The peo- 
ple living there plant nothing else but 
cabbage, and have tried nearly all high- 
ly recommended varieties, and this is 
their choice. At that place the seeds are 
sown in October and November. The 
bulk of the cabbage raised there is ship- 
ped North in April and May, and is the 
finest which comes to the Chicago 
market. 

Improved Early Summer. This 
cabbage is of recent introduction. It is 
not quite so large as the Brunswick; 
for fall it can be sown in August; 
for spring, in November and as late 
as January. It heads up very uniform 
and does not produce many outside 
leaves. It is hardier than the Bruns- 
wick, and stands the cold and heat bet- 
ter. The seed I offer , is of the best 
strain cultivated, and can be planted 
closer together than the late varieties — 
say about 8000 to the acre. The finest 
crop of this variety (one hundred and 
fifty thousand heads of cabbage) I ever 
saw, was raised three years ago near the 
city. The grower could commence on 
one end of the row to cut, and continue 
to the end, all well headed. They aver- 
aged about 7 pounds. 

Improved Earg^e Late Drum- 
head. Fine large variety; should be 
sown early in the fall for winter, or 
during December and January for late 
si:>ring use ; it will stand more cold 
weather than the Brunswick. 

Superior Eate Flat Dutch. 
This is the most popular variety for 
winter cabbage, and cultivated by al- 
most every gardener who plants for 
the New Orleans market. My stock is 
of superior quality, and I venture to 
say that seventy-five per cent, of all 
cabbage sold in the New Orleans market 
are of seeds which have been obtained 
from my store. During winter and 
spring, specimens which are brought 
as sampjles to my establishment, weigh- 
ing from fifteen to twenty-five pounds, 
can frequently be seen. In regard to 
the time of planting, see remarks under 



34 



KICHAKD FEOTSCHEK's ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Drumhead Savoy. 





St. Denis, or Chou Bonneuil. 




Green Globe &a\oy 



Early Flat Dutch. 




Frut^^hcr :^ Sai-erxOi L«te i lat Datch. 



Earlv Large Oxheart 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



35 




Early York. 



Large Flal Bnmswick. 



Early Dwarf Savoy 





Early Drumhead Cabbage. 

head of "Cabbage" in the directions for 
planting for July. I have tried seed of 
the Flat Dutch from different growers, 
but have found none yet to equal the 
stock I have been selling for years, and 
which is raised for me by contract. 

Red Duteli. Mostly used for pick- 
ling or salads. Very little cultivated. 

Oreeai €rlobe Savoy. Medium 
sized heada, not very hard, but all the 
leaves can be used. This and the fol- 
lowing varieties are of fine flavor, and 
preferred by many over the other kinds. 

Early Dwarf Savoy. Headsrather 
small, but solid; leaves very curled 
and succulent; of a dark green color. 
Very fine for family garden. 

Drumliead Savoy. Leaves are 
wrinkled, but not quite so much as the 
two foregoing kinds. It grows to a good 
size with large roundish heads. 



Improved Early Summer. 

St. Denis, or Cliou Moiineuil. 

This was, at one time, 'one of the most 
popular varieties grown for this market, 
but during the past few years has not 
done so v\^ell as formerly, and is, there- 
fore, planted very little now.f It wants 
good ground and high cultivation. It 
does better for spring than for fall. 
Should be sown in November. 

Excelsior. There are several varie- 
ties called by this name. What I offer 
is a second early variety; light green 
color, but few outside leaves and a large 
roundish head. It is not as hardy as 
the Superior Flat Dutch, and does ex- 
cellently when planted for the spring. 
Seeds sown last season as late as Jan- 
uary, produced fine, large heads. It 
stands the heat better than the Bruns- 
wick. This variety, the Brunswick and 
Early Summer, are the best to plant for 
shipping in the spring. 



CAULIFLOWER. 

Choufleur (Fr.), Blumenkohl (Ger.), Coliflor (Sp.). 



Extra Early Paris. 

Half Early Paris. 

Early Erfurt. 

Le Normands (short- stemmed). 



Early Italian Giant. 
Late Italian Giant. 
Imperial. 
Large Algiers. 



This is one of the finest vegetables grown, and succeeds well in the vicinity 
of New Orleans. Large quantities are raised on the sea-coast in the neighborhood 



36 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL. 



of Baratada Bay. The two Italian varieties are of excellent quality, growing, to 
large size, and are considered hardier than the German and French varieties. I 
have had specimens brought to my store, raised from seed obtained from me, 
weighing sixteen pounds. Tlie ground for planting Cauliflower should be very rich. 
They thrive best in rich, sandy soil, and require plenty of moisture during the for- 
mation of the head. The Italian varieties should be sown from April till July ; the 
latter month and June is the best time to sow the Early Giant. During August, 
September and October, the Le Normands, Half Early Paris and Erfurt can be 
sown. The Half Early Paris is very popular, but the other varieties are just as good. 
For spring crop the Italian kinds do not answer, but the Early French and German 
varieties can be sown at the end of December and during January, in a bed pro- 
tected from frost, and may be transplanted into the open ground during February 
and as late as March. If we have a favorable season, and not too dry, they will 
be very fine ; but if the heat sets in soon, the flowers will not attain the same size 
as those obtained from seeds sown in fall, and which head during December and 
January. 

Extra Early Paris. The ear- 
liest variety ; heads small, very 
tender. 

Half Early Paris. The most 
popular in the New Orleans market. 
Heads of good size, white and com- 
I)act. 

Early Erforf. This variety is 
of more dwarfish growth than the 
two former. Heads white and of 
good size. Heads witii certainty, 

Ee J^'oriiiands is a French vari- 
ety, and largely cultivated here. 
It stands more dry weather than 
the other varieties, and has large 
and pure white heads. Not so pop- 
ular as the Half Earty Paris in 
this market, but there is no good 
reason v;hy it should not be, as it 
is an excellent variety in every 
respect ; stands the heat better than 
any other. 

Earge Algiers. A French va- 
riety of the same season as the Le 
Normands, but a surer producer. 
It is one of the best kinds, and has 
taken the place of other second 
early varieties since it has been in- 
troduced. 

Early Italiaii Oaaiit. Very 
large line sort, not quite so late as 
the Late Italian, and almost as 
large. The heads are quite largej 
white and compact, and of delicious 
flavor. I recommend it to all who 
have not tried it. "When sown at 




Le Normands short-stemmed Caulillower. 




fOE I'HE SOUTHERN STATES. 



37 




Early Italian (jiaut Cauliflower. 



the proper season, it will head with cer- 
tainty, and will not fail to give satis- 
faction. 

L.ate Italian Giant. This is the 
largest of all the Cauliflowers. It is 
grown to a considerable extent in the 
neighborhood of New Orleans. It is very 



large and compact; should not be sown 
later than June, as it takes from seven 
to nine months before it heads. 

Imperial. A variety from Fratfce, 
very similar to the Le Normands, per- 
haps a little earlier ; v-ery good. I recom- 
mend it highly. 



CARROT. 

Carotte (Ft.), Moehre or Gelbe Ruebe (Ger.), Zanahoria (Sp.) 



Earlij Scarlet Horn. 
Half Long Scarlet French 
Improved Long Orange. 
Long Bed without core. 



St. Valerie. 
Half Long Lac. 
Danver's Liter mediate. 



Requires a sandy loam, well manured the previous year, and deeply spaded up. 
Should be sown in drills ten to twelve inches a})art, so the plants can be worked 
after they are up. Gardeners here generally sow them broad-cast, and often the 
roots are small from being crowded too much together. 



Early Scarlet Horn. A shcTrt, 
stump-rooted variety of medium size, 
very early and of line flavor. Not culti- 
vated for the market. 

Half Long: Frencli Scarlet. This 
is the most poimlar variety, and exten- 
sively grown for the market as well as 
for family use. It is a little later than 
the Early Horn, but much larger ; bright 
scarlet in color, and of fine flavor. 

Half Long- L<nc. This is a new va- 
riety from France. It is as early as any 



previously mentioned, but stump-rooted 
and larger. It is very smooth and of a 
tine color. 

Improved Long: Orang^e. This is 
an old variety; roots long and of deep 
orange color. It is not much cultivated 
in this section, and the flavor is not so 
fine as that of the two id receding, kinds. 
Valuable for field culture. 

Long- Red, without core. A new va- 
riety from France, which is of cylindri- 
cal shape, very smooth, bright scarlet 



38 



EICHARD FROTSCHEE's ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 






Eiiiiv Scarlet Horn Carrot. 



Hall Long Luc Carrot 



Half LougFrencli 
Scarlet Carrot. 





Long Red Carrot Avithout core 



St. Valerie Carrot. 



Danver's Intermediate. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



39 



color, and of fine flavor; has no heart 
or core. It is not quite so early as the 
Half Long-, but more productive. Con- 
sider it a tirst-class variety for tlie table, 
and one that will come into general cul- 
tivation when better Ivuown. 

St. Valerie. A new variety from 
France, bright red in color; a little lar- 
ger and longer than the Half Long 
French, and stronger in the leaves. 



This is one of the finest carrots, and 
will in the course of time take the place 
of the Half Long. It is very smooth. 

Kaiiver's. An intermediate Ameri- 
can variety of recent introduction. It 
is of a bright orange color ; very smooth ; 
symnjotrically formed ; somewhat 
stump-rooted like the Half Long Luc. 
It will produce more in weight to the 
acre than any other Half Long variety. 



Large White Solid. 
Perfection Heartwell 
Tar nip-Booted. 



CELERY. 

Celeri (Fr.), Sellerie (Ger.), Apio (Sp.). 

Dwarf Large Ribbed. 



(New.) 



Catting or Soup. 



Sow in May and June for early transplanting, and in August and September 
for a later crop. Sow thinly and shade during the hot months. When the plants 
are six inches high, transplant into trenches about four inches deep, nine wide 





Dwarf, Large RiWb'^d Celery. 



Large White Solid Celery 



40 



RICHAED FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



and two e^ud a half feet apart, made very rich by digging in rotten manure. 
Plants should be from 6 to 8 inches apart. When planted out during the hot 
months, the trenches require to be shaded, which is generally done by si:>reading 
cotton cloth over them ; latanniers will answer the same purpose. Celery requires 
plenty of moisture, and watering with soapsuds, or liquid manure, will benefit the 
plants a great deal. When tall enough it should be earthed up to blanch to make 
it fit for the table. 



Liarge l^Vliite Solid. This variety 
used to be planted exclusively, but since 
the introduction of half dwarf and dwarf 
kinds has been dropped, more so by 
market garde.uers. It is crisp, but not 
as fine flavored as the following kinds. 

Perfection Heartwell. A new in- 
troduction from France. This variety 
is in size between the Large White Solid 
and Dwarf kinds ; it is of excellent 
quality, very thick, and when blanched 
the heart is of a beautiful golden yellow 
color ; preferable to the White Solid , and 
one of the best kinds ever introduced. 

Celeriac or Tur»ip-Rooted Cel- 
ery, is very popular in some parts of 
Europe, but hardly cultivated here. It 
should be sown in the fall of the year, 
and transplanted six inches apart, in 
rows one foot apart. When the roots 
have obtained a good size, they are 
boiled, scraped off, sliced and dressed 
with vinegar, etc., as a salad. 

Dwarf Liarge Ribbed. This kind 
was brought here several years ago from 
France. It is short, but very thick- 



ribbed, solid and of fine flavor. The 
best dwarf variety for this section. 

Celery for Soup. This is sown in 
the spring of the ^^ear, broad-cast, to be 
used for seasoning, the same as Parsley. 




Celeriac or Turuip-Kooted Celery 



CHERVIL. 

Cerfeuil (Fr.), Kerbelkraut (Ger.). 
An aromatic i)lant, used a good deal for seasoning, especially in oyster soup, 
and is often cut between Lettuce when served as a salad. In the N"orth this vege- 
table is very little known, but in this section there is hardly a garden where it is 
not found. Sow broad-cast during fall for winter and spring, and in January and 
February for summer use. 

COLLARDS. 

A kind of cabbage which does not head, but the leaves are used the same as 
other cabbage. Not so popular as in former years, and very little planted in this 
vicinity. 

CORN SALAD. 

Mache, Doucet (Fr.\ Acker Salat (Ger.), Valeriana (Sp.). 
Broad-leaved Corn Salad is the variety generally cultivated. It is used as salad 
during the winter and early spring months. Should be sown broad-cast during 
fall and winter, or in drills nine inches apart. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



41 



CORN. 

INDIAN. 

Mais (Fr.), Welschkoen (Ger.), Matz (Sp.). 



Extra Early Dwarf Sugar. 
Adam's Extra Early. 
Early Sugar or Sweet. 
StoweVs Evergreen Sugar. 
Golden Dent Gourd Seed. 
Early Yellow Canada. 
Large White Flint. 



BlunVa Prolific Field. 
Ini'proved Learn ing. 
Golden Beauty. 
ChamxAon White Pearl. 
MoHhy's Prolific: 
Hickory King. 



Plant in hills about three feet apart, drop four to five seeds and thin out to two 
or three. Where the ground is strong the Adam's Extra Early and Crosby's Sugar 
can be planted in hills two and a half feet apart, as these two varieties are more 
dwarfish than the other kinds. Plant for a succession from February to June. 

selected anil planted here for a 



Extra Early, or Crosby's Dwarf 
Sug:ar. This is a very early variety 
and of excellent quality. Ears small, 
but very tender. It is not so extensively 
planted as it deserves to be. 

Adam's Extra Early, the most 
popular variety with market gardeners 
for first planting. It has no fine table 
qualities, but as it grows to a good size, 
and is matured in about forty days from 
time of planting, it meets with ready 
sale in the market, and for these reasons 
gardeners prefer it. 

Early Sug^ar, or New Engfland. 
A long eight-rowed variety, which suc- 
ceeds the Extra Early sorts. Desirable 
variety. 

Stowel's Evergreen Sug^ar. This 
is the best of all Sugar Corn. It is an 
early Corn, but the ears are of large size, 
and are well filled. It remains green 
longer than any other variety, and is 
quite productive. The cultivation of this 
excellent cereal, as well as all other Sug- 
ar Corn,' is much neglected, yet why 
people will plant common field-corn for 
table use, considering size instead of 
quality, I can not understand. 

6olden Dent Oourd Seed. Afield 
variety which is very productive at the 
North, It makes a very fine Corn South, 
but has to be planted here several years 
in succession before it attains perfection 
as during the first year the ears are not 
well covered by the husk, which is the 
case with all Northern varieties. When 



few 

years, it becomes acclimated and makes 
an excellent Corn, with large, fine ears, 
grain deep and cob of medium size. 

Early Yellow Canada. A long 
eight-rowed V-ariety. It is very early, 
and is planted in both the field and gar- 
den. It does well here. 

Earge White Flint. A very popu- 
lar variety with gardeners and ama- 
teurs. It is planted here for table use 
principally, but like the Golden Dent, 
makes an excellent kind for field culture 
after it has been planted here for two or 
three years. 

Blunt's Prolific Field Corn. This 
is a very excellent variety, either for the 
field or for the table. It is very prolific, 
producing from four to six ears of corn. 
They are of medium size, but well filled 
and heavy. It is second early. This 
variety has done better than any other, 
and, being of Southern origin, it seems 
to be better adapted to our climate. I 
recommend it as an early yielding Corn 
for field culture. 

Improved Eeaniing. An extra 
early variety, sold by me for the first 
time five years ago. It is not hard and 
flinty, but sweet and nutritious, making 
excellent feed and fine meal. The ears 
are large and handsome, with deep, 
large grains, deep orange color and 
small r(^d cob. It is very productive. 
The shucks cover the ear better than any 
Northern or Western variety I have ever 



42 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMaNaC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 




Champion White Pearl Corn 



tried. It i^- adapted to a variety of soils, 
and produces well on heavy or li2:ht soli : 
it has shown itself as very reliable. 

GoMeo Beauty. Tiiis variety is the 
handsomest of all yello\v corn ; the ears 
are of a perfect shape, loiipr. and filled 
out to the extreme end of the cob. The 
grains are not of a flint3^ type, neither 
are they so soft as to be greatly shrivell- 
ed, as in the Golden Dent. Golden 
Beauty matures early, ripening in eighty 
days from planting, and suri^asses all 
in size and beauty of grain. 

Claainpioii T^'liite Pearl. This is 
a very handsome white corn. The grain 
is pure white, exceedingly heavy and 
long, two of which will span the cob, 
which is small. Being medium in size 
of stalk it can be planted much thicker 




Improved Leamiug. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



43 



than a large Corn, and at the same time 
bear a full sized ear. The oriprinator has 
established in Champion White Pearl 
Corn a short, thick stalk, vith the ear 



growing low upon it, which is an advan- 
tage in stormy weather. 

inosby's Prolific C-oraa. This is a 
Southern Corn, and is ivcommended for 




Golden Beauty Coru 



Hickory King Coru. 



44 



RICHARD FROTSCHER^S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




jii Mj p^ilig 



Evergreen Siigur Corn Early Sugar, or New England Corn. 

general crop. The originator of this 
variety says: "This corn is a cross be- 
tween two widely different varieties. It 
is purely white, small cob, deep, full 
grain, neither too hard nor too soft. It 
will stand crowding in the drill as close 
again as any other variety. Ears of 
medium size, but long. It stands the 
drought better than ordinary corn." 
Should be planted early. 

Hickory King-. This New Field 
Corn was introduced here by me last 



Extra Early Sugar Corn. 

year. It has proven itself all that was 
claimed for it. It is the largest grained 
and smallest White Dent Corn in the 
World. It is very early, and comes in 
succession to the Adams Early. The 
ears are from seven to nine inches in 
length, and are generally borne from 
three to five to a stalk, making it very 
productive. The ears are well covered 
I by the shucks ; a great consideration in 
Field Corn planted in the South. 



CRESS. 

Cresson (Fr.), Kresse (Ger.), Berro (Sp.). 

Used for salad during Avinter and spring. Sov/ broad-cast or in drills six 
inches apart. 

Curlcca or Pepper Orass. Not much used in this section. 

Broad-Leaved. This variety is extensively cultivated for the market. It is 
sown from early fall to late spring. The leaves resemble Water Cress ; a variety 
which does not well succeed here. Is considered a very wholesome dish. 

CUCUMBER. 

CoNCOMBRE (Fr.), GuRKE (Gcr.j, Pepino (Sp.). 



Improved Early White Spine. 
Earltj Frame. 
Long Green Turkey. 



Early Cluster. 

Long Green White Spine. 

Gherkin, or Burr {for pickling.) 



Cucumbers need a rich soil. Plant in hills from three to four feet apart; the 
hills should be made rich with well decomposed manure, and eight to ten seeds 



FOR THE SOUTHEfiN STATES. 



45 



should be planted in each hill', and covered about one-half inch dee|) ; when well 
up, thin out to four plants in the hill till the vines meet. When the spring" is dry 
the plants have to be watered, else they do not keep in bearing lonj?. They can 
be planted from March till July. A great many cucumbers are planted here in 
February, or even sooner, and are protected by small boxes with a pane of glass 
on top. These boxes are removed during the day, and put back in the evening. 
When days-are cloudy and cold, the plants are kept covered. 



Improved Carly White Spinie. 

This is the most popular variety. It is 
of medium size, light green, covered 
with white spines, and turns white when 
ripe. The best kind for shipping. Of 



late years it is used by most gardeners 
for forcing as well as outdoor culture. 
It is very productive. 

Early Frame. Another early va- 
riety, but not so popular as the fore- 




We&t India Gherkin. 



Early Fram? 



Early Cluster. 



46 



KICHARD FKOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



going kind. It is deep green in color, 
but turns yellow very quickly; there- 
fore gardeners do not plant it much. 

L<OB%g: Greeia Tisrltey. A long va- 
riety attaining a length of from fifteen 
to eighteen inches when well grown. 
Very fine and productive. 

Early Cluster. Early, short and 
prickly; it bears in clusters. 

L<okBg: Greetj ^Vliite Spine or 
^ew Orieaus rtlarfeet. This is a va- 
riety selected from an imported forcing 
cucumber introduced by me. It is good 
for forcing or open ground; very pro- 



ductive, keeps its green color, and has 
few vines. This kind can not be ex- 
celled for shipping, as it produces very 
perfect cucumbers and but few culls; 
the largest growers of cucumbers for 
shipping about here plant none but this 
variety. It is quite different from the 
Long White Spine offered by some. 

Tl^est India Gherkin. This is an 
oval variety, small in size. It is used 
for pickling when young and tender. 
When grown to its full size it can be 
stewed with meat. In fact, this is the 
onlv use made of it about New Orleans. 



The following may be of some importance to those who 
contemplate the raising of Cucumbers. 

The Ciscuniber is a very important crop for the Southern Gardener and 
Truck-farmer. To give some information on the cultivation I publish the following 
letter which is written by one of the most extensive and successful growers of this 
vegetable in this neighborhood ; he plants exclusively the Long Green White Spine 
or New Orleans Market. 



Nine Mile Point, Jefferson Parish, 
Sept. 17th, 1888. 

Mr. EICHIRD FrvOTSCHEE, 

New Orleans. 

Dear Sir : 

Iq compliance with your 
request, "to give you a description of 
my practice in growing Cucumbers," I 
send you this. Old growers will not find 
anything new in it, but to beginners it 
may be of some service. 

There are three methods in general 
use by growers here. They are forcing 
in hot-beds, growing in cold frames, and 
the field crop. Of the first I have little 
to say here ; it requires a plentiful supply'- 
of fresh stable manure, or other heating 
material, and so obliges one to be located 
where such can be had in abundance, 
and in my opinion, to be uniform and 
successful, requires also skilled labor. 

My practice for growing in the cold 
frames is as follows. I make a good hot 
bed, (for doing this you have given clear, 
and ample instructions, in your Alma- 
nac and Garden Manual) make the beds 
large enough to hold three five inch 



pots for every sash ^-ou have in your cold 
frames ; this will allow for one-third 
djung. The hot bed should be made the 
last week in, December ; in a week after, 
place your pots in the bed, fill the pots 
with a rich light soil, in this sow your 
seed, seven or eight in each pot, cover 
a little less than half an inch deep, let 
the ground on top of the pots get dry 
before watering, then water freely, close 
up the sash and keep it closed until the 
seed begins to come up, which it will do 
in less than three days. From this time 
on, the hot bed must be carefuUy 
watched, plenty of air given on bright 
days, even pulling the sash entirely off 
for a few hours in the middle of warm 
clear days. In cold cloudy weather keep 
them closed, the young plants are, at 
this stage, very liable to damp off. To 
prevent this, give plenty of air when the 
weather is good ; if it is wet and cold, 
and the sash cannot be opened, sprinkle 
plenty of air slacked lime in the frame. 
Water only when dry, and then only in 
fair weather. When the plants are well 
up, thin out to three in a pot. After the 
second rough leaf is formed, pinch off 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



47 



the top bud, this will make them stocky. 
In four weeks after sowing the seeds, the 
plants should be fit to set out in the cold 
frames. The ground in the frames 
should be made rich and light, loose 
and well dug over with the spade. It is 
important to prepare the soil in the cold 
frames well, or a poor crop will be the 
result. 

The transplanting from the hot-bed to 
the cold frame should be done on a warm 
calm"day; knock the plants out of the 
pots carefully to avoid breaking the ball. 
Plant two hills under each sash, at about 
two feet apart, close up the sash as fast 
as planted, and do not water until next 
day ; do not give any air till the plants 
recover the transplanting. As you will 
nov/ have to depend on the heat of the 
sun to keep your i)lants growing, do not 
open your sashes too wide, open them 
only on fine days, and then open them 
late in the morning, and close them 
early in the evening. Tv;o or three 
weeks of this treatment will bring the 
plants well forward, and as the weather 
gets warmer, give more air, stir the 
ground with a hoe to keep it loose, water 
plentifully when needed. By the first 
of March they should be setting fruit 
freely. From this time on, the sash can 
be pulled off entirely during the day, 
and put on again at night ; as the weather 
gets warmer give plenty of vrdter, in fact 
keep the ground almost wet. Cut oifall 
cucumbers as fast as they get large 
enough for the market; do not leave 
any on the vines to get old, as it will 
have the effect of retarding the growth 
of the young fruit; thus making the 
vines less productive. 

For the field crop, we plant the seed 
in strawberry boxes ; in cold frames, the 
boxes are four inches each way, width, 
length and depth. This is the best 
size ; they are without bottoms ; they are 
packed in the frame close together, filled 
with a good soil and 5 or 6 seed planted 
in each box ; water, shut the sash and 
keep it shut until the seed begins to come 
up. Then from this on give plenty of 
air in good weather, water freely when 
dry, and thin out to three in a box ; in 



about four weeks they will be fit to plant 
out in the field. Have the ground where 
they are to be planted, well plowed, 
fine and in good order; open the rows 
eight feet apart with a plow. To take 
the plants out of the frames, run a sharp 
spade just under the bottoin of the boxes 
to cut them loose from the bed, lift them 
on the spade and i)lace them close to- 
gether in a cart; pack them tight in the 
bottom of the cart to prevent jolting 
about in hauling to the field. Drive the 
cart on the ground to be planted, take 
the boxes one by one carefully out of 
the cart, and place them in the furrow 
already opened, about two feet apart; 
have a hand follow with a sharp knife, 
and cut dov/n one corner of the box, and 
remove it in one piece, without breaking 
the ball of earth about the roots of 
the plants. Much depends upon this 
being carefully done ; let hands enough 
follow with hoes to fill up the furrow 
with soil, drawing plenty of fine dirt to 
the roots of the plants. They must be 
watered if necessary. The after-treat- 
ment will be to keep the ground about 
the plants and between the rows loose 
and fine with the cultivator and hoe. 
Just before the vines begin to run, say 
in ten days after planting, bar off close 
to the plants with the plow, and in the 
furrow on both sides of the plants scat- 
ter a small handful of cotton seed meal 
or other good fertilizer ; cover this with 
the plow, and plow out the middles; 
keep the ground loose around the plants, 
being careful not to disturb the vines at 
any time, and when the vines cover the 
ground no further cultivation is neces- 
sary. By this method we generally get 
fruit three weeks earlier than from seed 
planted in the field. I need not tell you 
that earliness in truck-farming is almost 
everything. The time for planting the 
seed in the boxes for the crop will de- 
pend on the season, locality, etc. This 
much is certain, you can keep the plants 
in the boxes for only four, or at the 
most five weeks after planting the seed. 
After that time they get too large to 
transplant safely. The only guide is to 
use our own judgment and plant the 



48 



EICHARD FEOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



seed four weeks before we expect the 
last frost in the spring. 

I have written this plainly, and de- 
scribed my practice so minutely, because 
I know from experience how hard it 
sometimes is to get from books, etc., a 



practical idea of how to do anything 
that we have little or no previous knowl- 
edge of. 

Yours very respectfully, 

Wm. Nelson. 



EGG-PLANT. 

Aubergine (Fr.), Eierpflanze (Ger.\ Berengena (Sp.). 

The seed should be sown in hot-beds in the early part of January. "When a 
couple of inches high they should be transplanted into another frame, so that the 
plants may become strong and robust. When warm enough, generally during 
March, the plants can be placed in the open ground, about two and a half feet 
apart. This vegetable is very popular in the South, and extensively cultivated. 





Large Purple Egg- Plant. 



JLarg^e PHs-pBe, or New Orleans 
Market. This is the only kind grown 
here ; it is large, oval in shape and of a 
dark purple color and very productive. 
Southern grown seed of this, as of a 
good many other tropical or sub-trop- 
ical vegetables, it is |)referable to North- 
ern seed, as it will germinate more 



readily, and the plant will last longer 
during the hot season. 

Early Dwarf Oval. This variety 
is very early and productive ; the fruit is 
not so large as the New Orleans Egg- 
plant, but equal in flavor. For market 
it will not sell as well as the former; 
desirable for family garden. 



ENDIVE. 

Chicoree 'Fr.i, Endivien (Ger.), Endibia (Sp.). 
A salad plant which is very popular and much cultivated for the market, prin- 
cipally for summer use. It can be sown in drills a foot apart, and, when the plants 
are well up, thinned out till about eight inches apart. Or it can be sown broad- 
cast thinly and transplanted the same as Lettuce. When the leaves are large 
enough, say about eight inches long, tie them up for blanching, to make them fit 
for the table. This can only be done in dry weather, otherwise the leaves are apt 
to rot. For summer use do not sow before the end of March, as if sown sooner, the 
plants will run into seed very early. Sow for a succession during the spring and 
summer months. For .winter use sow in September and October. 



roK Ti-E soutije;;:n states. 



49 



Oreen Curled. Is the most desir- 
able kind, as it stands more heat than 
the followin.c? sort, and is the favorite 
market variety. 

£xtrni Fine Curled. Does not grov/ 
quite so large as the foreg('ing, and is 
more apt to decay when there is a wet 
summer. Better ada[)ted for winter. 

Broad-Leaved, or £searo!Se. 
Makes a fine salad when well ,c^ro\vn 
and blanched, especially for summer. 




Green Curled Enrlive. 



KOHL-RABI, or TMNIP-ROOTED CABBAGE. 

Chou Navet (Fr.), Kohl-Kabi (Ger.), Col de Nabo (Sp.). 
This vegetable is very popular with the European population of this city, and 
largely cultivated here. It is used for soups, or prepared in the same manner as 
Cauliflower. For late fall and winter use 
it should be sown from the end of July 
till the middle of October ; for spring use 
dujlng January and February, When 
the young plants are one month old 
transplant them in rows one foot apart, 
and about the same distance in the rows. 
They also grow finely if sown broad-cast 
and thinned out when young, so that 
the plants are not too crowded ; or, they 
may be sown in drills, and cultivated 
the same as Euta Bagas. 

Early l¥Siite Vieniaa. The finest 
variety of all, and the only kind I keep. 
It is early, forms a smooth bulb, and has 
few small leaves. The so-called large 
White or Green is not desirable. 

LEEK. 

Toireau (Fr.j, LAucH(Ger.), Puero (Sp.). 

A species of Onion, highly esteemed 
for flavoring soups. Should be sow^n 
broad-cast and transplanted, when 
about six to eight inches high, into rows 
a foot apart, and six inches apart in the 
rows. Should be planted at least four 
inches deep. They require to be well 
cultivated in order to secure large roots. 
Sow in October for winter and spring 
use, and in January and February, for 
summer, 

Liarge L.ondon Flag:. Is the most 
desirable kind, and the most generally 
grown. 

L<arg:e Carentan. This is a new 
French variety which grows to a very 
large size. Large London Flag Leek. 




SICHAKD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AKD GABDEX MANUAL. 



LETTUCE. 



Ger.\ Lechuga (Sp.). 
White Farts Coss. 
Ferpignan. 
Lnprovecl Large Fashion. 



Laitue [Ft.), Lattich 
Early Cabbage, or WldteButter-Heacl 
Improved Boyal Cabbage. 
Brown Dutch Cabbage.. 
Ihmmhead Cabbage. 

Lettuce is sown here during the vrhole year by the market prardener. Of course 
it takes a great deal of labor'to i>roduce this vegetable during our hot summer 
months. For directions how to sprout the seed during that time, see "Work for 
June." The richer and better the ground the larger the head will be. No finer 
Lettuce is grown anywhere else than in Xew Orleans during fall and spring. The 
seed should be sown broad-cast, and when large enough, planted out in rows a foot 
-apart, and !'rom eight to ten inches apart in the rows. Some kinds grow larger 
than others : for instance, Butterhead will nor require as much space as Drumhead 
or Perpignan. 




Drumhead Cribba-t- Lettuce. 





Improved Royal Cab^a2■e Lettuce. 



White "jiris Coss Lettuce. 



Early €al>?>aire, or ^Vfeite Biit- 
fer. An early variety, forming a solid 
head, but not quite so large as some 
others. It is the best kind for family 
use, to sow during fall and early spring, 
as it is very early and of G'ood flavor. 

Improved Koya! Catof>ag:e. This 
is the most popular variety in this State. 
Heads light green, of large size, and 



about two weeks later than the White 
Butter. It is very tender and crisp ; can 
be sown later in the spring than the 
foregoing kind, and does not run into 
seed so quickly. 

BroTin Diiteli Cabbag^e. A very 
hard kind, forms a solid head ; not so 
popular as many other kinds ; good for 
winter. 



FOR THE SOUTHEUN STATES. 



91 



I>ruE]i]}ieacl Ca6>l>ag-e. An excel- 
lent spring variety, forming large heads, 
the outer leaves curled. 

"H^SiUe ParB# Cos??. This is very 
popular wiih the New Orleans market 
gardeners, as it is the favorite v>i.th the 
French population It grows to perfec- 
tion and forms large, fine heads, partic- 
ularly in the spring of the year. 

Perpig^Biasi. A fine German variety 
which forms large, light green heads, 
and which stands the heat better than 
the Eoval. It is much cultivated for the 



market, as it thrives well when sown 
during the latter end of spring. 
Ini5>B-ovedl. fi^ssia'^e Passion. This 

is a large Cabbag-e Lettuce introduced 
by me from California ; it attains a large 
size, grows slowly, but heads very hard. 
It does better here during late autumn 
and winter than in summer, as it cannot 
stand the heat. If sown late in the fall 
and transplanted during winter, it grows 
to very large heads, hard and firm. It 
is the kind shipped from here in the 
spring. 



MELON, 

MUSK OK CANTELOUPE. 

Netted Nutmeg. i Earhj White Japan. 

Netted Citron. Persian or Cassaba. 

Pine Apxjle. i New Orleans Market. 

Melons require a rich sandy loam. If the ground is not rich enough, a couple 
of shovels full of rotted manure should be mixed into each hill, which ought to be 
from five to six feet apart ; drop ten or twelve seeds, and when the plants have two 
or three rough leaves, thin out to three or four plants. Canteloupes. are cultivated 
very extensively in the neighborhood of New Orleans ; the quality is very fine and 
far superior to those raised in the North. Some gardeners plant during February 
and cover with boxes, the same as described for Cucumbers. When Melons are 
ripening, too much rain will impair the flavor of the fruit. 




"f- f.H.Otl 



Note.— The above cut represents the N'ew Orleans Melon; it has been taken from a commoa speci- 
men grown by one of my customers, who raises the seed of this variety for me. 



52 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Netted Mutmeg^ melon. Small 
oval melon, roughly netted, early, and 
of fine flavor. 

Netted €itroei€antctoiiB>e. This 
variety is larger than the foregoi ng kind ; 
it is more rounded in shape, of medium 
size and roughly netted. 

Pine Apple Cantelonpe. A me- 
dium sized early variety, oval in shape, 
and of very fine flavor. 

£arly White Jupaii Cantc- 
loupe. An early kind, of creamish 
white color, very sweet, and of medium 
size. 

PeD'Siaai or Cassaba. A large va- 
riety, of oval shape and delicate flavor. 
The rind of this kind is very thin, which 
is a disadvantage in handling, and pre- 
vents it from being planted for the mar- 
ket. Yery fine for family use. 

New Orleans Marfeet. A large 
species of the citron kind. It is exten- 
sively grown for this market; large in 
size, very roughly netted and of luscious 



flavor; different altogether from the 
Northern Netted Citron , which is earlier, 
but not so fine in flavor, and not half 
the size of the variety #i'own here. The 
New Orleans Market cannot be excelled 
by any other variety in the world. In a 
favorable season it is a perfect gem. I 
have tried it alongside of varieties prais- 
ed at the North, such as are brought out 
every year,— but none of them could 
compare with the New Orleans Market. 
As for some years past the seeds were 
scarce I had some grown North, but 
they lost their fine qualities, size and 
flavor. It requires a Southern sun to 
bring the seed to perfection. Small va- 
rieties of melons will improve in size if 
cultivated here for a number of years, 
and if care is taken that no Cucumbers, 
Squashes, Gourds or Pumpkin are culti- 
vated in the vicinity. Ir" the best and 
earliest specimens are selected for seed, 
in three or four years the fruit will be 
large and fine. 



Melon d'Eau 

Mountain Sweet. 

Mountain Sprout. 

Ice- Cream (Wliite Seeded.} 

Orange Water. 

Battle Snake. 

Cuban Queen. 



MELON. 

WATER. 

Er.), Wassermelone (Ger.), Sa.ndia (Sp.). 

Mammoth Iron Clad. 
Pride of Georgia. 
Kolb Gem. 
Fl/jrlda'a Favorite. 
Oemler'H Triumph. 



Water Melon will grow and produce in places where Canteloupe will not do 
well. The soil for this plant should be light and sandy. Plant in hills about eight 
feet apart, eight to twelve seeds in a bill ; when the plants are well up thin out to 
three. The plants should be hoed often, and the ground between the hills kept 
clean till the vines touch. 



JTIountain Sweet W^a- 
ter. This was once a very 
popular variety ; it is of ob- 
long shape, flesh bright 
scarlet, and of good flavor. 
It is very productive. 

ITfountain Sprout Wa- 
ter. This is similar in the 
shape to the foregoing va- 
riety, but rather later. It 




Mountain ;?\YQet Vv'^t t Alelou 



FOR THE SOUTHtiRN STaTES. 



53 



is light green with irregu- 
lar stripes of dark green. 
Flesh bright scarlet. 
Ice-Cr*jain. (White 

Seeded.) A tnediuiii sized 
variety of excellent qual- 
ity. It is early and very 
productive. Being thin 
in the rind it is not so well 
adapted for the niarkei: 
as the other kinds; not- 
withstanding this, it is 
grown exclusively by 
some for that, on account 
of its earliness. It has 



vation more and more 
every year, as it is very 
sweet, and sells readily 
in the market. 

Orange Water. Quite 
a distinct variety from 
the others. The rind can 
be peeled off the saine as 
the skin of an orange. It 
is of medium size, fair quality 
little cultivated. 




Mouutaiu Sprout Melon. 




Yery 



Rattle Saake. An old Southern 
variety whicli has come into notice of 
late years. It is of large size, light 
green, with large dark stripes, and is 
identical with the Gipsey. Fine market 
variety. It stands transportation better 
than most other kinds; has been the 
standard market variety till the Kolb's 
Gem was introduced. However, it always 
will remain a favorite with market-gar- 
deners. The seed I offer of this variety, 
is grown for me by one of the best 
growers in Georgia. It is of the purest 
strain that can be found. 

Cuban Qciecii. A striped variety ; 
highly recommended by Northern 
seedsmen; said to reach from fi I'ty to 
seventy pounds. Sweet and of delicate 
flavor ; it does not grow as large here as 
said it does North. 

Mainmotti Iron Clad. A new 

variety; hi^rhly recoinmenled North. 
It did not dt) as well as Southern raised 
seed. I have the seed now grown in 



('ubr\"n Queen. 

Florida, and, no doubt, it will give bet- 
ter satisfaction. 

Pride of Georg^ia. A new Melon 
from Georgia, of excellent quality ; at- 
tains a large size when well cultivated. 
A very good variety for family use, 

TSic MoSb Gem. Only a few years 
since this variety has been introduced, 
but the shii>ping qualities are so good, 
that the bulk of melons raised for the 
market are of that kind. Flesh crimson, 
very thin but tough rind ; fine flavor and 
full of flesh, no hollow in the mtddle. 
It is the heaviest melon for its size. 
What I offer are Southern grown seeds, 
wdiich stand the sun better and produce 
larger and more Melons than Northern 
grown seeds. 

Florida's Favorite. This variety 
was introduced two years ago. It origi- 
nated with W. M. Giiardeau, of Monti- 
cello, Fla. It is an excellent variety, 
very prolific, earlier than the Kolb Gem, 
Eattlesnake or Pride of Georgia, and 
very fine for the table. It is not as good 
for shii^ping a.s the Kolb Gem, or Rattle- 
snake ; it is of medium size, colored with 



54 



rjCHAED FE0TSCHEP.'"5 ALMANAC AND GAEDEN ilANtJAL 




Oemler's Triumph Water Melon. 



light and dark green stripes alternately, 
flesh deep red, deliciously sweet, ver>' 
firm and crisp. Best Melon for family 
use. 

OeisiSer's Triuiiiph Water mel- 
on. This new Melon originated on the 
borders of the Blacli Sea, in Russia. 
The seeds are so diminutive that a No. 
6 thimble will hold 55 of them, whereas 
it holds only 7 of those of our ordinary 
water melon seeds, hence they can be 
swallowed without inconvenience. It 
is very early and very productive. In 
shape it is a short oval, weighing about 
15 lbs., more or less. The color is a 




Mammoth Iron Clad Melon. 




Florida's Favorite Melon. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STz^TES. 



55 



dark mottled green, and that of the flesh a dark red with an edging of orange 
yellow. It has no light colored or tasteless core. Its flavor is very sweet. Gobd 
for family use. 




Pride of Georgia Melon. 




KoH Ge 11 Melon 



56 



RICHAED FEOTSCHER'3 ALMAN.^C AND GARDEN MANUAL 



MUSTARD. 

MouTARDE (Fr.), Senf (GerO, MosTAZA (Sp.). 

Wliite or Yellow Seeded. \ ' Large-Leaved Curled. 

Chinese very large Cabbage-Leaved. 

This is grown to quite an extent in the Southern States, and is sown broad-cast 
during fall, winter and spring. It may be used the same as spinach, or boiled with 
meat as greens. The White or Yellow Seeded is very little cultivated, and is used 
chiefly for medical purposes, or pickling. The large-leaved or Curled has black 
seed, a distinct kind from the Northern or European variety. The ^eed is raised 
in Louisiana. It makes very lai^'e leaves ; cultivated more and more every year. 
Large-IiCaved Curled. This is L.eaved. This is a European variety, 



the favorite kind here, sown largely for 
the market. Leaves are pale green, large 
and curled or scalloped on the edges. 
Chinese Very JLarge Cabt>agfe» 



wdth light green, very large leaves. It 
has not the same taste as the large- 
leaved or the large curled, but will stand 
longer before going to seed. 



NASTURTIUM. 

CAPUcaNE (Fr.j, Indianische Kresse (Ger.), Capuchina ^Sp.). 
Tall I Dwarf. 

Planted here only for ornament. (For description, see List of Climbing 
Plants.) 

OKRA. 

Green Tall- Growing. \ Dwarf Green. \ New Velvet. 

This is a highly esteemed vegetable in the South, and no garden, whether small 
or large, is without it. It is used in making *'Gumbo,"' a dish the Creoles of 





New Velvet. 



Tall Growing Okra. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



57 



Louisiana know how to prepare better than any other nationality. It is also boiled 
in salt and water, and served with vinegar as a salad, and is considered a very 
wholesome dish. Should not be planted before the ground is warm in spring as the 
seeds are apt to rot. Sow in drills, which ought to be two to three feet apart, and 
when up, thin out, and leave one or two plants every twelve or fifteen inches. 



Tall Growing:. This is the variety 
most cultivated here. The pods are 
long, round towards the end, and keep 
tender longer than the square podded 
kind. 

Dwarf Green. This is a very early 
and prolific variety, and remains tender 
longer than any other. It has come 
into general cultivation, planted much 
more than the tall. It may be said 
here, that all dwarf varieties, when culti- 



vated here in this locality for some 
years, will grow taller every year, 

New Velvet. A new variety ; dwarf, 
round, smooth pods, free from ridges 
and seams, and not prickly to the touch ; 
very prolific and early. I tried this 
variety the last two years, and sold a 
good deal of the seed last year. It has 
come up to what is claimed for it. I re- 
commend it to all who have not tried it. 



ONION. 

Ognon (Fr.), Zw'iEBEL (Ger.), Cebolla (Sp.). 
Louisiana or Creole. ' | New White Queen. 

The Onion is one of the most important vegetables, and is grown to a large ex- 
tent in Louisiana. It is one of the surest crops to be raised, and always sells. 
Thousands of barrels are shipped in Spring from here to the Western and Northern 
States. There is one peculiar feature about raising Onions here, and that is, they 
can only be raised from Southern or so-called Creole seed. No seed from North, 
West, or any part of Europe, will produce a merchantable Onion in the South. 
When the crop of Creole seed is a failure, and they are scarce, they will bring a 
good price, having been sold as high as ten dollars a pound, when at the same time 
Northern seed could be had for one-fourth of that price. Northern raised seed can 
be sown to be used green, but as we have Sliallots here which grow during the 
whole autumn and winter, and multiply very rapidly, the sowing of seed for green 
Onio»ns is not profitable. Seed ought to be sown from the middle of September 
to the end of October ; if sown sooner, too many will throw up seed stalks. When 
the month of September has been dry and hot, the beds where the seeds are sown 
ought to be covered with moss. Where this cannot be had, palmettos can be used, 
but they should be taken off in the evening and replaced in the morning. When 
the seeds are well up, this is no longer necessary, but watering should be continued. 
— They are generally sown broad-cast, and when the size of a goose quill should be 
transplanted into rows one to two feet apart, and about five inches in the rows. 
Onions are different, in regard to rotation, from other vcifetables. They do best if 
raised on the same ground for a succession of years. Onions did not bring very 
high prices, owing to the very heavy yield, the largest ever made in Louisiana upon 
the same acreage. The crop of seed has been short the past season, and prices so 
high that it was impossible to sow any for sets. Could not fill orders received in 
the latter part of the season ; seeds were sold out. 



Liouisiana or Ci'eole Onions. This 
is generally of a light red color, darker 
than the Strass burg, and lighter in color 
than the Wethersfield. The seed I have 



been selling of this kind, for a number 
of years, has been raised on Bayou La- 
fourche, and has never failed to make 



58 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




The crop of Creole Oaioa seed having failed some years ago, I sold a good deal 
of Italian seed and had ample opportunity to see the results The Giant Koca I 
have discarded; it takes too long to bulb and is very spongy. The Bermuda and 
Red Trij-oli have done fairly, but the Onions do not mature as early as the Creole, 
and do not keep so well, although attaining a very large size, and more so the Ber- 
muda. They are of mild flavor, and well adapted to be used up in spring; but I 
would not recommend them to be raised for shipping, except the White Queen. 



NEW ITALIAN ONIONS. 



Nti^' Queeai. This is a medium 
sized, white variety from Italy, verj'^ 
early and liat ; can be sown as late as 
February, and good sized bulbs will j'^et 



be obtained. It is of mild flavor and 
very line when boiled and dressed for 
the table. It can not be too highly 
recommended. 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 59 



SHALLOTS. 

EOHA-LLOITE (Fl'.), SCHALOTTEN (Ger.). 

A small sized Onion which j^rowsin clumps. It is generally grown in the South, 
and used in its green state for soups, stew, etc. There are two varieties, the Red 
and White ; the latter variety is the most popular. In the fall of the year the bulbs 
are divided and set out in rows a foot apart, and four to six inches in the rows. They 
grow and multiply very fast, and can be divided during winter, and set out again. 
Late in spring, when the tops become dry, they have to be ttiken up, thoroughly- 
dried, and stored in a dry airy place. 

PARSLEY. 

Persil (Fr.\ Petersilie (Ger.), Perjil (Sp.). 
Plain Leaved. l Improved Gamuhing. 

Double Curled. I 

Parsley can be sown during the fall from August to October, and during 
spring, from the end of January to the end of April. It is generally sown broad-cast. 

Plain Leaved. This is the kind ' liavur as the other kind, but is not so 



raised for the New Orleans market. 

Double Cwrled. The leaves of this 
variety are curled. It has the same 



popular. 

Improved Garnflsliaiig:. This is 
the best kind to ornament a dish ; it has 
the same flavor as the other kinds. 



PARSNIP. 

Panais (Fr.), Pastinake (Ger.), Pastinaqa (Sp.). 

Hollow Croion, or Sugar. 

Should be sown in deep, mellow soil, deeply spaded, as the roots are long, in 

drills twelve to eighteen inches apart ; when the plants are three inches high, thin 

out to three inches apart in the row. Sow from September to November for winter, 

and January to March for spring and summer crops. 

The Hollow Crowia, or l§ugar, I sesses all the good qualities for which 
is the kind generally cultivated ; it pos- I other varieties are recommended. 

PEAS. 

Pois (Fr.), Erbse (Ger.), Guisante (Sp.). 
EARLIEST. 
Cleveland's Alaska, %feet. Early Tom Thumb, Ifoot. 

Extra Early, or First and Beat, 21 feet. Laxton's Alpha, 3 feet. 

Early Washington, 3 feet. American Wonder, l\feet. 

SECOND CROP. 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod, Ihfeet. McLean's Little Gem, Ik feet. 

Champion of England, 5 feet. Laxton's Prolific Long Pod, 3 feet. 

McLean's Advancer, 3 feet. Eugenie, 3 feet. 

Carter's Stratagem, 2hfeet. Carter's Telephone, 5 feet. 

GENERAL CROP. 

Large White Marrowfat, 4 feet. 
Dwarf Sugar, 2J feet. 



Dwarf Blue Imperial, 3 feet. 
Royal Dwarf Marrow, 3 feet. 
Black Eyed Marrowfat, It feet. 



Tall Sugar, 6 feet. 



60 



RICHARD FROTSCHERS ALMA.NAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Peas are a flne vegetable, and therefore are very generally cultivated. It is 
best to plant in ground manured the previous year, else they will make more vines 
than peas. As a general thing the dwarf kinds require richer ground than the 
tall grov/ing varieties. Marrowfat Peas planted in rich ground will not bear well, 
but they produce finely in sandy light soil. 

The Extra Early, Tom Thumb, or Laxton's Alpha will not produce a large 
crop without being in rich ground. Peas have to be planted in drills two inches 
deep and from two to three feet apart, according to the height they may grow. 
Tom Thumb can be i)lanted one foot apart, whereas White Marrowfat or Cham- 
pion of England require three feet. The Extra Early, Alpha and Tom Thumb can 
be planted during August and September for fall. During November and Decem- 
ber w^e plant the Marrowfats ; January and February, as late as March, all kinds 
can be planted, but for the latter month only the earliest varieties should be used, 
as the late varieties will get mildewed before they bring a crop. Peas will bear 
much better if some brush or rods are stuck in the drills to support them, except 
the very dwarf kinds. 



C!evelaii«l'§ Als&ska. This is an 

extra early Pea, blue in color, the ear- 
liest by a few days of any other kind ; 
very pure and prolific, the best flavored 
pea among the Extra Early smooth 
podded kinds. Eecommend it highly. 



Exls-a Early, or First and Best. 

This was the earliest Pea cultivated, 
until the xilaska was introduced; very 
popular with the small market garden- 
ers here, who have rich grounds. It is 
very productive and ffooi flavored. The 




FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



61 



Stock I sell is as good as any sold in the 
country, not surpassed by any, no mat- 
ter whose name is put before "Extra 
Early." 

Early ll^aslii»tg:toBi. Earfiy May 
or Frame, which are all nearly the 
same thing ; is about ten days later than 
the Extra Early. It is very productive 
and kee[)S longer in bearing than the 
foregoing kind. Pods a little smaller. 
Yery poi)ular about New Orleans. 

Toan Ti3Butnb. Very dwartish and 
quite i)roductive. Can be cultivaled in 
rows a foot aj^art ; requii"es no brandies 
or sticks. 

LaxtotiB's AlB>l>a. This is a variety 
of recent introduction ; it is the earliest 
wrinkled variety in cultivation ; of deli- 
cious flavor and very prolific This va- 
riety deserves to be recommended to all 
who like a first-class pea. Tt will come 
into general cultivation when better 
known. 

Jtifiesican WoiiB^leF. A wrinkled 
pea of dwarf growth, 10 to 12 inches; 
it is proliflc, early, and of fine quality ; 
it comes in!after;;the Extra Early. 

Bislio|i's Dwarl" I^ong Pod. An 
early dwarf variety; very stout and 
branching; requires no sticks but sim- 
ply the earth drawn around the roots. 
It is very productive and of excellent 
quality. 

ChaiiipioBi of Eiig^laiid. A green, 
wrinkled variety of very fine flavor; not 
profitable for the market, but recom- 
mended for family use. 

Mcl^ean's Advancer. This is an- 
other green, wrinkled variety, about two 
weeks earlier than the foregoing kind. 

]?IeL.eaii»s JLittle €reiii. A dwarf, 
wrinkled variety of recent introduction. 
It is early, very proliflc and of excellent 
flavor. Eequires no sticks. 

LiaxtoaV'^ Prolific JLong: Pod. A 
green marrow pea of good quality-. 
Pods are long and well filled. It is sec- 
ond early, and can be recommended 
for the use of market gardeners, being 
very prolific. 

£iig'eiiie. A white wrinkled variety, 
of fine flavor ; it is of the same season 



as the Advancer. Cannot be too highly 
recommended for family use. 

Carter's 8trata$;;:eiiii. This is a 
ncAv wrinkled variety from England, 
sold by me for the first time two years 
ago. It is very distinct in vine and foli- 
age, growing thick and large, does not 
need any support. It is the latest variety 
ever brought out, pods 4— 5\ inches 
long, which cannot be surpassed in fla- 
vor, and is very productive. Recommend 
it highly. 

Carter's Telephone. Another 
wrinkled English late variety; grows 
about from 4t> to 5 feet high. The pods 
are very long containing from 8—12 fine 
flavored Peas. It is productive ; will 
bear twice as much as the Cham^pion of 




Carter's Stratagem. 



62 



EICHARD rSOTSCHEliS ALMANAC AND GARDEN jlANTAL 




Carter's T-lepbone. 

England which is about of the same 
season. 

Dwarf Blue lEii3>erial. A very 
j?ood bearer if planted early, pods are 
iar.Q:e and well filled. 

Royal Dwarf :TIarroWa Siiniiar 
to the large ^Earrowfat, but of dwarf 
habit. 

Black-eyed 3Iarrowfat. This 
kind is planted more for the market 
than any other. It is very nroduelive, 
and when young, quite tender. Grows 
about four feet high. 




E.s::ra Early, or First and Best. 



Liarge TVIiite :?Iarrowfat. Simi- 
lar to the last variety, except that it 
grows about two feet taller, and is less 
productive. 

Dwarf Siig-ar. A variety of which 
the whole pod can be used after the 
string is drawn off from the back of the 



po 



1 Three feet high. 



Tall ^ugar. Has the same qualities 
as the foregoing kind, only grows taller, 
and the pods are somewhat larger. 
Neither of these two varieties are very 
popular here. 



THE PEA BUG. 

All peas grown near Philadel})hia have small holes in them, caused by the 
s<"iDg of the Pea Bus, while the pod is forming, when it deposits its eg^ in it. Later 
the insect perfects itself and comes out of the dry pea, leaving the hole. 

The germ of the pea is never destroyed, and they grow equally as well as those 
without holes. Market gardeners in this neighborhood who have been planting 
the Extra Early Peas for years, will not take them without holes, and consider 
these a trade mark. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



63 



FIELD OR COW PEAS. 

There are a great many varieties of Cow Peas, different ia color and growth. 
They are planted mostly for fertilizing purposes, and are sown broad-cast ; when 
in a good stand, and of sufficient height, Ihey are plowed under. The Clay Pea is 
the most popular. There are several varieties called crowders, which do not grow 
as tall as the others, but produce a great many j^ods, which are used green, the 
same as snap-beans, and if dried, like dried beans, make a very good dish. The 
crowders are of an oblong shape, almost pointed at one end ; they are on an aver- 
age larger than the other Field Peas. Lady Peas are small, white, with a black 
eye ; they are generally planted between corn, so that they can run up on it. Dry, 
they are considered the very best variety for cooking. 



PEPPER. 

PiMENT (Fr. ), Spanischek Pfeffer (Ger.), Pimento (Sp.). 



Bell or Bull Nose. 
Sweet Sxjanish Moiistroua. 
Siceet Eubij King. 
Golden Dawn Mango. 
Long Red Cayenne. 



Bed Cherry. 
Bird Eye. 
Chili. 

Tabasco. 



Peppers are tender and require to be raised in the hot-bed. Seed should be 
sown in January, and when large enough transplanted into the ground in rows 
from one and a half to two feet apart, and a foot to a foot and a half in the rows. 
There are more Peppers raised here than in other sections of the country ; the hot 
A'arieties are used for seasoning and making popper sauce; the mild variety is 
highly esteemed for salad. Care should be taken not to grow different kinds close 
together, as thev mix verv readilv. 



Sweet Spanish or Iflonstroiis. 

A very popular variety, much culti- 
vated. It is very mild, grows to a large 
size, tapering towards the end, and, 
when green, is used as a salad. Supe- 
rior for that purpose to any other kind. 

S^veetjPepper, ISutoy Mang'. This 
variety grows to a larger size than the 
Sweet Spanish Monstrous, and is of 
different shape. The fruit is from 5 to 
inches long by about 3 to 4 inches in 
diameter, and of a bright red color. It 
is remarkably mild and pleasant in 
flavor, and can be sliced and eaten as a 
salad, the same as the Spanish Mon- 
strous. Single plants ripen from 8 to 10 
fruits, making this variety both produc- 
tive and profitable. A decided acquisi- 
tion. 

Ooldd'ni I>;ft \VB^ Mnng-o. This sweet 
pepper attracted much attention for the 
last three years, and was admired by all 
who saw it. I believe it to be all the 
originator claims for it. In shape and 



size it resembles the Bell. Color, a 
bright waxii golden yellow, very brilliant 
and handsome. Single plants rii)en 
from twelve to twenty -four fruits, mak- 
ing them productive and prolitable. 
They are entirely exempt from any liery 
taste or lUivor, and can be eaten as 
readily as an a])ple. 

Bell or JBsill 1^'ose. Is a large ob- 
long variety whicJi is not sweet or mild, 
as thought by some people. The seeds 
are very hot. Used for ])ickling 

LiOHg: Hv.fl €55.v<»B88je. Is very hot 
and pungent. Cultivated hei'o and used 
for I'cp] er sauce and seasoning pur- 
poses. There are two varieties; one is 
long and straight, and the other like 
shown in cut, which is the only kind I 
keep. 

lied CSierry. A small roundish va- 
riety, very hot and j^roductive. 

Bird Eye. Small, as the name indi- 
cates. It is very hot and used princi- 
pally for pepper vinegar. 



61 



EICnAED FROTSCHEK 3 ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




oeet Pepper Ruby King. 





LoBg Eed Cayenne Pepper. 



Red Cherry Pepper. 



Chili. A small variety, from three- 
fourths to an inch long. It is strong, 
and used for pepper sauce ; very prolific. 

Tabasco. True. Another small va- 



riety, used more for pepper sauces than 
any other kind ; the fruit is easily 
gathered, growing almost erect on the 
branches. 



POTATOES. 



PoMME DE Tj:ree (Fr.), Kartoffel (Ger.). 

Earl II Eose. l Snowflake. 

Breese's Peerless. i , Bearity of Hebron. 

Bussets. I White Elephant. 

Extra Early Vermont. ' Eural Blush. 

Potatoes thrive and produce best in a light, dry but rich soil. Well decom- 
posed stable manure is the best, but if not to be had, cotton seed meal, bone dust, 
pr any other fertilizer should be used to make the ground rich enough. If the 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



65 



ground was planted the fall previous with Cow Peas, which were plowed under, it 
will be in good condition for Potatoes. Good sized tubers should be selected for 
planting, which can be cut in pieces not too small ; each piece ought to contain at 
least three eyes. Plant in drills from two to three feet apart, according to the 
space and how to be cultivated afterwards. Field culture two and a half to three 
feet apart ; for garden, two feet will answer. We plant potatoes here from end of 
December to end of March, but the surest time is about the first of February. If 
planted early they should be planted deeper than if planted late, and hilled up as 
they grow. If potatoes are planted shallow and not hilled soon, they will suffer 
more, if caught by a late frost, than if planted deep and hilled up well. Early po- 
tatoes have not the same value here as in the North, as the time of planting is so 
long, and very often the first planting gets cut down by a frost, and a late planting, 
which may just be peeping through the ground, will escape and produce in advance 
of the first planted. A fair crop of potatoes can be raised here if planted in August ; 
if the autumn is not too dry, they will bring nice tubers by the end of November. 
They should not be cut if planted at this time of the year, but planted whole. 
They should be put in a moist place before planting, so they may sprout. The 
early varieties are preferable for this time of planting. 

I have been handling several thousand barrels of potatoes every season for 
planting, and make Seed Potatoes a specialty. The potatoes I sell are Eastern 
grown, which, as every one interested in potato culture knows, are superior and 
preferable to Western grown. 

I have tried and introduced all new kinds here ; but of late 30 many have come 
out that it is almost impossible to keep up with them. New varieties of potatoes 
come out with fancy prices, but these prices for new potatoes do not pay here, as 
we can keep none over for seed, and any person raising for the market would not 
realize a cent more for a new fancy variety per barrel, than for a barrel of good Peer- 
less or Early Eose. Earliness is no consideration, as we plant from December to 
end of March. Somebody may plant Early Pvose in December and another in Feb- 
ruary, and those planted in February come to the market first ; it depends entii-ely 
upon the season. If late frosts set in, early planted potatoes will be cut down, and 
those just coming out of the ground will not be hui't. The Jackson White has given 
but little satisfaction the last four years, except in oases where planted very early. 
The yield was very good, but the quality poor and very knotty. Perhaps this was 
the fault of the season. It is hardly planted any more for the market. Up to now 
the Peerless is tlie standard variety. Among the new kinds I have tried, I find the 
White Elephant to be a fine potato. It is a very strong grower, tubers oblong, very 
productive, good quality and flavor. It is late, and will come in at the end of the 
season, if planted with the earlier varieties. The Extra Early Vermont, Beauty of 
Hebron, Snowflake and Early Eose for early, and Peerless and White Elephant for 
late, are as good varieties as exist, and it is not likely that we will have anything 
better by new introductions. The Eural Blush, which I introduced two years ago, 
may be added to the late varieties ; it is of excellent quality, strong grower, and 
yields heavily. Most people are not careful enough in selecting their seed. Some 
of the potatoes sold in this market for seed are not fit for planting. 



Early Hose. This is, without any 
doubt, the best potato for the table. 
It is oval, very shallow-eyed, pink- 
skinned, very dry, and mealy when 
boiled. It has not become so popular ^ 
as it deserves as a market variety, as 
I pink or red potatoes do not sell so well 
here as the white kinds. This variety 



should not be planted too soon, from the 
fact that they make small stalks, and 
cut down by frost, they suffer more than 
other varieties; but they want rich, 
light soil to grow to perfection, 

Breese's Peerless. Fifteen years 
ago this variety was introduced, yet at 
present it is the leading variety for mar- 



66 



KfcSAED FfeCrTSCHER's ALMASfAC AND GAEDEST MANUAL 




y.xiva Early A'e]-iiiout. 








^ AMmfi '^^^^^^^'^ ff^"'"' ^ ' 



Snowilake. 



ket as well as for family use. Skin dull 
white, sometimes slightly russetted ; 
eyes few and shallow, round, occa- 
sionally oblong; grows to a large size; 
very productive and earlier than the 
Jackson White. As white potatoes are 
more salable than pinkish kinds, and as 
this variety is handsome in appearance, 
and of good quality, it has become the 
general favorite in this section. 

Russets. This kind is still planted 
by some. It is round, reddish and slight- 
ly russetted. Eyes deep and many. 



Tery productive, but not so line a qual- 
ity as soD;ie others. Does best in sandy 
soil, such as we have along the lake 
coast. If the season is dry it will do 
well, but in a wet season, this variety 
will rot quicker than any other. 

Extra Early Terinoiit. Yery sim- 
ilar to the Early Kose, 'out of a stronger 
growth : a little earlier, and the tubers 
iire more uniform and larger. It is an 
excellent table variety. 

Saiowflake. This is a very early 
variety, Tubef§ good medium size, 



FOR THE SOUTHEEN STATES. 67 



elongated, very uniform and quite pro- i excellent table quality ; more mealy 

ductive. Eyes flat on the body of the than the Early Eose, but smaller, 

tuber, but compressed on the seed end. "%%'lsifeEfiepBiaiit. This variety has 

Skin white, flesh very fine grained, and i again given entire satisfaction the past 

when boiled, snow-white. j season. The tubers are large and of ex- 

BeaiBty of MeRiroaa. I have tried | cellent quality ; planted alongside of the 

this variety thoroughly and found it in | Peerless, it produced fully one third 

every particular as has been rei^re- ! more than that variety. 

sented. It is earlier than the Early j Mural US tisla. Second early, tubers 

Eose, which resembles it very much, \ roundish flattened, blush skin, flesh 

being a little lighter and more russetted j slighted with pink. Very dry and of 

in color. It is very productive and of i excellent quality. A heavy yielder. 

THE SWEET POTATO. 

* ■ Convolvulus Batatas. 

The sweet Potato is nest to corn the most important food crop in the South. 
They are a wdiolesome and nutritious diet, good for man and beast. Though cul- 
tivated to a limited extent on the sandy lands of New Jersey and some of the middle 
States, it thrives best on the light rich lands of the South, which bring their red 
and golden fruits to greatest perfection under the benign rays of a southern sun. It 
is a plant of a w^arm climate, a, child of the sun, much more nutritious than the Irish 
Potato on account of the great amount of saccharine matter it contains, and no 
southern table should be found without it from the first day of August till the last 
day of May. Some plant early in spring the potato itself in the prepared ridges, 
and cut the vine from the potato when large enough, and plant them out; others 
start the potatoes in a bed prepared expressly for that purpose, and slip off the 
sprouts as they come up, and set these out. The latter method will produce the 
earliest potatoes ; others who set the vines, say that they make the largest tubers. 
In preparing the land the soil should be thoroughly pulverized, the ridges laid off 
about five feet apart, well drawn up and rather flat on top. If every thing is ready, 
and time for planting has arrived, do not wait for a rain, make a paste of clay and 
cow manure ; in this dip the roots of the slips and press the earth firmly around 
them. Old slips are more tenacious of life than young ones, and wdll under cir- 
cumstances answer best, Wa^tering afterwards, if dry weather continues, of course 
will be beneficial. Otherwdse plant your vines and slips just before or after a rain. 
Two feet apart in the row^s is considered a good distance. The ridges should never 
be disturbed by a plow from the time they are made until the potatoes are ready to 
be dug. 

Scrape off the grass and young weeds with the hoe, and pull up the large ones 
by hand. Crab grass is peculiarly inimical to the sweet potato, and should be 
carefully kept out of the patch. The vines should never be allow^ed to take root 
between the rows. Sw^eet potatoes should be dug before a heavy frost occurs ; a 
very light one wdll do no harm. The earth should be dry enough to keep it from 
sticking to the potatoes. The old fashioned potato bank is the best arrangement 
for keeping them, the main points being a dry place and ventilation. 

Varieties generally cultivated in the South. 



The Yam. Taking into considera- 
tion quality and productiveness, the 
Yam stands at the head of the list. 
Frequently, when baked, the saccharine 
matter in the shape of candy will be seen 
hanging to them in strings. Skin and 



flesh yellow and very sweet. Without 
a doubt, the best potato for family use. 
Southern Queen. Very similar to 
the former, but smoother, the tubers 
having no veins or very few ; it is earlier. 



68 



SICHARD FROTTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Sliat]§:hai or Califoraiia Yarn. 

This is the earliest variety we have, 
frequently, under favorable circum- 
stances, giving good sized tubers two 
months after planting the vine. Very 
productive, having given 300 bushels per 



acre when planted early and on rich 
land. Is almost the only kind cultivated 
for the New Orleans market. Skin dull 
white or yellow, flesh white, dry and 
mealy, in large specimens frequently 
stringy. 



There are some other varieties of Sweet Potatoes highly prized in the West, but 
not appreciated here. The Eed and Yellow Nansemond are of a fine quality and 
productive, but wilLnot sell so well as the California Yam, when taken to market. 
For home consumption they are fine, and deserve to be cultivated. 



PUMPKIN. 

PoTiRON (Fr.), KuREiss (Ger.), Calabaza (8p.). 
Kentucky Field. ■ Cashaic Qpook N^ck. (Green Striked.) 

Large Cheese. i Golden Yellow Mammoth. 

Are generally grown in the field, with the exception of the Cashaw, which is 
planted in the garden ; but great care must be taken not to plant them close to 
Squashes or Melons, as they vrill mix and ^poil their quality. Plant in hills from 
eight to twelve feet apart. 




Golden Yellow Mammoth. 



Kentucky Field. Large round, 
soft shell, salmon color ; very produc- 
tive ; best for stock. 

Lar§:e Cheese. This is of a bright 
orange, sometimes salmon color, fine 
grained, and used for table or for stock 
feeding. 

Cashaw Crooli ::Veck. This is 
very extensively cultivated in the South 
for table use. There are two kinds, one 
all yellow and the other green striped 
with light yellow color. The latter is 
the preferable kind; the flesh is fine 



grained, yellow and very sweat. It 
kee ps welL This variety takes the place 
here of the Winter Squashes, which are 
very little cultivated. 

Ooldeo Yellow :?Iamiiioth. This 
is a very large Pumpkin. Flesh and skin 
are of a bright golden color, fine grained 
and of good quality. I had some 
brought to the store weighing one hun- 
dred to one hundred and fifty pounds, 
raised on land which was not manured 
or fertilized. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



69 



RADISH. 

Eadies, Eave (Fr.), Radies, Rettig iGer.), Rabano (Sp.). 



Scarlet Half Long French. 

Scarlet Olive-shaped, White- Tipped or 

French Breakfast. 
Black Spanish ( Winter). 
Chinese Rose {Winter). 



Faj'ly Long Scarlet. 

C?iar tier's Long. 

Earhj Scarlet Turnip, 

Golden Globe. 

Marly Scarlet Olive-shaped. 

White Summer Turnip. 
This is a very popular vegetable, and grown to a large extent. The ground for 
radishes should be rich and mellow. The early small varieties can bo sown broad- 
east among other crops, such as beets, peas, spinach, or where lettuce has been 
transplanted. Early varieties are sown in this section the whole year, but during 
summer they require frequent watering to make them grow quickly. The Golden 
Globe and White Summer Ifcrnip are best for planting during the summer months. 
The Half Long Scarlet French is the only red kind raised for the New Orleans 
market, and all the other cities in the United States taken together do not use as 
many of that one variety as New Orleans does. I have sold nearly two thousand 
pounds of the seed per annum for the last twelve years- 



Early iiong: Scarlet. This is a very 
desirable variety ; it is of a bright scar- 
let color ; short top and very brittle. 

Chartier's liOng^ Hadisli. Anew 
long Radish, described as deep crimson 
colored at the top, shading off lighter, 
until at the bottom it becomes white, 

My trials with this variety have not 
been satisfactory ; the roots are larger, 
but not very symmetrical, and not bet- 
ter in flavor than the long scarlet. Never 
will become a favorite here. 

Early Scarlcl Turnip. K small, 
round variety, the favorite kind for fa- 
mily use. It is very early, crisp and 
mild when young . 

Ooideii Olobe. This stands the 
heat better than the foregoing kinds. 
It is of an oblong shape, and of a beau- 
tiful bright yellow color. It should be 
sown very thinly. Best adapted for 
summer and fall sowing. The variety 
I keep is of the finest strain, and as good 
as any ever sold. 

Early Scarlet O live -shaped. 
This is similar to the Half Long French, 
but shorter, and not quite so bright in 
color. It is early and of good quality. 
Top short. 

"WiiBte Summer Tursiip. This is 
a summer and fall variety. Oblong in 
shape, skin white, stands the heat well, 
but not much used. 



Scarlet Half JLong Frencli. 

This is the most popular Radish for the 
market. It is of a bright scarlet eolor^ 
and when well grown, from two to three 
inches long, very brittle and tender. 

Scarlet Olive-sgiaped. White 
tipped, or FreiicRa Breakfast. A 
handsome Radish of the same shape as 




Early Loug Seariet. 



70 



EICHAED FROTSCHES S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Early Scarlet ruruip. 



'arlet Half Long French. 



Golden (-ilobe. 



the foregoing Irlnd, with end and root 
white. Quite tender. 
Black ^jpasifisli. (Winter.) This 

is sown during fall and early winter. 
It is oval in shape, very solid, and stands 
considerable cold weather without be- 
ing hurt. It can be sown broad-cast be- 
tween Turnips, or planted in rows a 
foot apart, thinned out from three to 
four inches in the rovv^s. 

Cliinese Rose. (Winter.) This is 
of a half long &hape, bright rose color. 
It is as hardy as the last described kind, 
not so popular, but superior to the lore- 
going kind. Consider it the best win- 
ter variety. 

New l¥liite StB'asl>t8rg-li. A new 
variety, of an oblong, tapering shape; 
the skin and flesh are pure white, firm, 
brittle and tender, and has the tendency 
of retaining its crispness even when the 
roots are old and large. It is a very good 
kind for summer use, as it withstands 
the severe heat, and grows very quickly. 
The seed can be planted throughout 
the summer, and fine large roots v;'ili be 
rapidly formed. It is an excellent va- 
riety for family use, as well as for the 
market. 

ROQUETTE. 

RoQaETTE (Fr). 

Sown from September to March. It 
is used as a salad, resembling the Cress 
in taste. 



SALSiFY 



OR Oyster Plant. 

Salsifis (Fr.), Hafekwui^zel (Ger.\ 

OsTRA Vegetal (Sp.l. 

New Sandwich Island (Mammoth). 

A vegetable which ought to be more 

cultivated than it is. It is prepared in 

different ways. It partakes of the flavor 

of oysters. It should be sown in the fall 




Salsify, or Oyster Plant. 



POR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



tl 



of the year; not later than November. The ground onght to be manitred the 
spring previous, deeply spaded, and well pulverized. Sow in diills about ten 
inches apart, and thin out from three to four inches in tlie rows. 

New Saiidwflcli IsUiiid SaSsBfy. i ties, it attains a large size; can be called 
(Mammoth.) This is a new sort v;hieh I with right mammoth, 
grows much cfuiciver than the Old varie- I 



SPINACH. 

Epinard fFr.\ Spinat (Ger,), Espixago (Sp.). 

Extra Large Leaved Fai-oy. \ Broad Leaved Flandei^. 

A great deal of this is raised for the New Orleans Market. It is very popUlai\ 

Sov^n from September to end of March. If the fall is dry and hot, it is useless to sow 

it, as the seeds require moisture and cool nights to make them come tip. The 

richer the ground the larger the leaves. 



Extra Large £.eaved Ssivoy. The 

leaves of this variety are large, thick 
and a little curled. Very good for family 
use. 



Broait Leaved FSawders. This 
is the best standard variety, both for 
market and family use. Leave's large, 
broad and very succulent. 



SORREL. 

OsEiLLE vEr.), Sauerampeer (Ger.), Aced'era (Sp,). 

Planted in drills a foot apart, during the fall of the year, and tliiuned out from 
three to four inches in the drills. Sorrel is used for various purposes in the kitchen. 
It is used the same as Spinach ; also in soups and as a salad. 



SQUASH. 



Courge (Fr.), KuRBiss (Ger.), Calabaza ToNT.iNERA (Sp..). ■ . 
Early Bmh, or Patty Pan. ,i The Muhbrfrd. 

Long Green, or Summer Croot: Neck. j l^o^ton Marrotv. 

London Vegetable Marrow. ' 

Sow during March in hills from three to four feet apart, six to eight seeds. 
When Well up, thin them out to three of the strongest plants. For a succession 






Eariv Btish or i'atts' Pan 



Long Green or Summer Cro )k Neck. 



The Hubbard. 



73 



BIOHAED rEOTSOHEE^ ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



they can be planted as late as June. Some who protect by boxes, plant as soon as 
the first of February, but it is best to wait till tbe ground gets warm. When it is 
time to plant Corn, it is also time to plant Squash. 



£arBy Bush, or Patty Para. Is 

the earliest and only popular kind here. 
All other varieties are very little culti- 
vated, as the Cashaw Pumpkin, the 
striped variety, takes their place. It is 
of dwarfish habit, grows bushy, and 
does not take much room. Quality as 
good as any. 

liong g-reei?, or Sammer Crook- 
Bfeck. This is a very strong grower, 
and continues in bearing longer than 
the first named kind. It is of good' 
quality, but not so popular. 

JLondon Vegetable Marrow. A 
European variety, very little cultivated 
here. It grows to a good size and is very 
dry. Color whitish with a yellow tinge. 



The Uubhard. This is a Winter 
Squash, very highly esteemed in the 
East, but hardly cultivated here. It is, 
if planted here, inferior to the Southern 
striped Oashaw Pumpkin which can be 
kept from one season to another, and is 
superior in flavor to the former kind. 

Boston Marrow. Cultivated to a 
large extent North and East for winter 
use, where it is used for custards, etc. It 
keeps for a long time and is of excellent 
quality, but not esteemed here, as most 
people consider the Southern grown 
Cashaw Pumpkin superior to any Win- 
ter Squash. 



TOMATO. 

LiEBESAFFEL (Grer.j, TOJiATE (Sp.). 



Acme. 

Paraxon. 

Livingston's Perfection. 

Livingston's Favorite. 

Livingston's Btiautij. 



To^Ai^E (Fr.), 

Mng of the Edrlies. 
Extra Early- Dicarf Red. 
Early Large Smooth R6d. 
Tilden. 

Trophy, (Selected.) 
Large Yellow. 

Seed should be sown in January, in hot-beds, or in boxes, which must be placed 
in a sheltered spot, or near windows. In March they can be sown in the open 
ground. Tomatoes are generally sown too thick and become too crowded when 
two or three inches high, which makes the plants too thin and spindly. If they 
are transplanted when two or three inches high, about three inches apart each 
way, they will become short and sturdy, and will not suffer when planted into 
the open ground. Plant them from three to four feet apart. Some varieties can 
be planted closer; for instance, the Extra Early, which is of very dwarfish habit, 
two and a half feet apart is enough. 

They should be supported by stakes. When allowed to grow up wild, the fruit 
which touches the ground will rot. For a late or fall crop the seed should be sown 
towards the latter part of May and during June. 

King- of the Earlies. This Vtiriety I handsome in sha])e, that they will sell 



was introduced here by me last year. 
It is very early and produ<5tive; color 
bright red, of good size and quite solid. 
The vine is medium, stout and branching 
The buds appear soon, blossoms as a 
rule adhere and produce fruit. It is so 
much earlier"; than the Livingston va- 
rieties, that it should be planted for the 
first. The latter varie:.ies are so verv 



better than any other, wh&n the market 
is once well supplied. 

Extra Early Dwarf. This is the 
earliest in cultivation. It is dwarfish in 
habit: fruit larger than the following 
kind, and more flat ; bright scarlet in 
color and very productive. For an 
early market variety it cannot be sur- 
passed- 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



73 




King of the Lanieb. 





Livingstou's Favorite. 



Exim £avly tiwcvl. 



74 



RICHARD FKOTSCHER's ALMANAG ANt) GARDEN MASUAL 




Acme Tomalo. 




ParMgon. 



Early r.arge Smooth 
Reel. An early kind of me- 
dium size ; smootli and pro- 
ductive. 

TiSden. This has been 
the staiKlard variety for 
family gardens as well as 
market, but has been sup- 
planted to a great extent by 
later introductions. It is of 
a good shape, brilliant scar- 
let, and from above medium 
to large in size, and keeps 
well. 

Stiected Trophy. A 
very large, smooth Tomato, 
more solid and heavier than 
any other kind. It is not 
quite as early as the Tilden. 
Has become a favorite va- 
riety. 

I^arg-e Teilow. This is 
similar iu shape to the large 
Eed, but more solid. Not 
very popular 

Acifiie. This is one of the 
prettiest and raoBt solid To- 
matoes ever introduced. It 
Is Of medium size, round 
and very smooth, a strcng 
grower, and a good and long 
bearer. They are the per- 
fection of Tomatoes for fam- 
ily use, but will not answer 
for shipping purposes; the 
skin is too tender, and 
cracks when fully ripe. Of 
all the vnrieties introduced, 
none has yet surpassed this 
kind when all qualities are 
brought into consideration. 
It does well about here 
where the ground is heavy. 

Parag:oii. This variety 
has lately come into notice. 
It is very solid, of a bright 
reddish crimson color, comts 
in about the same time as the 
Tilden, but is heavier in fo- 
liage, and protects its fruit. 
It is productive and keeps 
long itibeaiing. Well adapt- 
ed for shipping. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES, 



% 




Liviugscoa s rJeauty. 



76 



RICHARD rROTSOHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Liviiig^stou's Perfection, Very 
similar to the foregoing in shape and 
color. 

liivisigJTSton's Favoiite. This nov- 
elty was introduced only a few years ago ; 
it is as perfect in shape and as solid as 
the Acme, but much larger, and of a 
handsome dark red color. I had some 
sent to me by a customer, and they 
surely were the finest specimen of toma- 
toes I ever saw, and were admired by 



everybody who saw them. They will 
keep well, and do not crack. 
liiviiig^stoii's Beauty. A new va- 

riety, offered for the first time three 
years ago. It is quite distinct in color, 
being a very glossy crimson with a light 
tinge of purple, (lighter than the Acme). 
It ripens with the Acme or Paragon, but 
keeps longer. It is very perfect in shape 
and does not crack, like some of the 
thin skinned sorts. 



The seeds of the last five varieties are raised for me by the origiuators. Messrs. Living'^tou's Sons 
and can be relied upon as being true to name and of superior quality. ' 



TURNIP. 

Navet (Fr.), Rube (Ger.), Nabo ComUn (Sp.). 



J^ariy Bed or Purple Top 

(strap-leaved). 
JEarhj White Flat Dutch, strap-leaved. 
Purple Top Globe. 
Large White Globe. 
Pornerian Globe. 
White Spring. 
Yellow Aberdeen. 



Golden Ball 
Amber Globe. • 
Earbj Purple Top Munich. 
Extra Early Purple Top. 
Pmple Top Rata Baga. 
Improved Buta Baga. 
Extra Early White French, or WJute 
Egg Turnip. 



Turnips do best in new ground. When the soil has been worked long, it should 
receive a top dressing of land-plaster or ashes. If stable manure is used the ground 
should be manured the spring previous to sowing, so it may be well incorporated 
with the soil. When fresh manure is used the turnips are apt to become speckled. 
Sow from end of July till October for fall and winter, and in January, February 
and March for spring and summer use. They are generally sown broad-oast, but 
the Ruta Baga should be sown in drills, or rather ridges, and should not be sown 
later than the end of August ; the Golden Ball and Aberdeen, not later than the 
end of September. The White Flat Dutch, Early Spring and Pomerian Globe are 
best for spring, but also good for autumn. 



Early Bed or Purple Top. 

(Strap Leaved.) This is one of the most 
popular kinds. It is flat, with a small 
tap-root, and a bright puri)le top. The 
leaves are narrow and grow erect from 
the bulb. The tlesh is finely grained 
and rich. 

Early Tf^fiaite Flat l>iit€Si. (Strap- 
Leaved.) This is similar to the above 
in shape, but considered about a week 
earlier. It is very popular. 

Purple Top Olobe. A variety of 
recent introduction ; same shape as the 
Pomerian Globe, but vrith puri»le top. 
Fine variety for table or for stock. It is 
not quite so early as the Early Red or 
Purple To]). I recommend it very highly. 



Larg^e lll^tiite Olobe. A very large 
variety, mostly grown for stock. It can 
be used for the table when young. Flesh 
coarse, but sweet; tops very large. 

Pomeriaei Olobe. This is selected 
from the above. It is smoother and 
handsomer in shape ; good to plant early 
in spring. When pulled before it is too 
large it is a very salable turnip in the 
market. 

IVSiitc Spring:. This is similar to 
the White Flat Dutch; not quite so 
large, but rounder in shape. The tops 
are larger; it is early, a good quality, 
and best adapted for spring planting. 

Yellow Aberdeen. This is a variety 
very little cultivated here. It is shaped 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



77 




like the Ruta Baga, color yellow with 
purple top. Good for table use or feed- 
ing stock. 
Robertson's CJolden Bali, is the 

best of the yellow Turnips for table use. 
It is very smooth, oval in shape, and of 
a beautiful orange color. Leaves are 
Binall. Should be sown in the fail of the 



year, and always in drills, so that the 
plants can be thinned out and worked. 
This kind ought to be more cultivated. 

Amber OBobe. This is very sirailar 
to the above kind. 

Early Fiirpli^ Toi> MiiBi«eh. A 
new variety from Germany; flat, with 
red or purple top ; same as the Ameri- 



I 



78 



EICHAED TBOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



can variety, but fifteen days ear- 
lier to mature. It is very hardj', 
tender, and of fine flavor. 

Piirpie Top liHta Ba§:a 
or Swede. This is grown for 
feeding stock, and also for table 
use. It is oblong in shape, yel- 
low flesh, very solid. Should al- 
Avays be sown in rows or ridges. 
Improved f eia'ple Top 
Riita Bag-a. Similar to the 
above ; but smoother, and with 
few fibrous roots. 

E i[ t F a "Early ~W li i t e 
Freificlft OS" ^¥§site Eg^g^ Tiir- 
iiBp. This is a lately introduced 
variety ;. is said to be Very early, 
tender and crisp. The shape of 
it is oblong, resembling an egg. 
Having tried it, I found it as 
represented, quickly growing, 
tender and sweet. It will never 
become a favorite market va- 
riety, as only flat kinds sell well 
in this market. It has t(^ be 
pulled up soon, as it becomes 
pithy shortly after attaining ma- 
turity. 




Pomerian Globe. 





Early White Flat Dutch [strap-leaved]. 



Milan Extra Early Purple Top. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



79 




Extra Early White French, or White Egg Turuip. 



ImprDYC'd Purple Top Kiita Baga, 



80 EIC.'IARD FEOTSCHEK'S ALMANAC AXD GARDEN' IuaNUAL 



TOBACCO SEEDS. 



liuported Havasia. I imported from one of the principal growers, the 
finest and purest strain of Yaelto Abajo ; which is considered the best of the 
Havana varieties. 

Price, 10 ets. per package,— 40 cts. per oz., ^i.Oo per lb. 

Couneeticut §eecl Leaf. A well-known American variety. 

Price, 10 cts. per package,— 25 cts. per oz.,— S2 50 per lb. 



SWEET AND MEDICINAL HERBS 



Some of these herbs possess culinary as well as medicinal properties. Should be 
found in every garden. Ground where they are to be sown should be well prepared 
and pulverized. Some of them have very fine seed, and it is only necessary, after 
the seed is sown, to press the ground with the back of the spade ; if covered too 
deep they cannot come up. Early spring is the best time to sow them— some, such 
as Sage, B.osemary, Lavender and Basil, are best sown in a frame and afterwards 
transplanted into the garden. 

Anise, Pwvp'melh Anmnn. Lavender, Lavandula Vera. 

Balm. MeVisse Officinalis, Jlajoram, sweet, Orignaum 2£ayoram. 

Basil, large and small leaved. Ocumum Pot IVIarigold, Calendula Officinalis. 

Basillcum. Eosemary, Rosemary Officinalis. 

Bene, Sesamum Orientale. Eue, Rata Graveolens. 

Borage, Borago Offidnalis. Sage, Salvia Officinalis. 

Caraway, Cariun Carni. Suramev Sayory, Satureja Horte/isis. 

Dill, Anethum G-raveolens. Thyme, Thymus Vulgaris. 

Fennel, sv.-eet. Anethum Foenicuhun. YTormwood. ArtemWta Absinthium. 



GRASS AND FIELD SEEDS. 

I have often been asked what kind of Grass Seed is the best for t^is latitude, 
but so far I have never been able to answer this question satisfactorily. For hay 
I do not think there is anything better than the ITiilet. For permanent grass I 
have almost come to the conclusion that none of the grasses used for this purpose 
North and West will answer. Barley, Eye, Red Oats and Rescue Grass will make 
-winter pasturage in this latitude. Different kinds of Clover answer very well during 
spring, but during the hot summer months I have never found anything to stand 
and produce, except the Bermuda and Crabgrass, which are indigenous to the South. 

Of late years the Lespedeza Striata, or Japan Clover, has been sown exten- 
sively, a description of which will be found on page 87. 

The Bermuda, in my opinion, is better suited for pasturage than hay, as it is 
rather short and hard when cureit. Having tried Guinea Grass I have come to the 
conclusion that it will not answer here, from the fact that it will freeze out every 
year. It will produce a large quantity of hay or green fodder, but has to be resown 
every spring. The seeds that are raised here are light, and do not germinate freely. 
To import seed everv year is rather troublesome. The Johnson Grass advertised 
by some as Guinea Grass, is not Guinea Grass ; it is much coarser, and can hardly 
be destroyed after having taken hold of a piece of ground. Some are enthusiastio 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



81 



about Alfalfa or Lucerne ; others, whose opinion ought also to be respected, say it 
will not do here. There exists a great difference of opinion in regard to which grass 
seed is most suitable for the South. 



Red Clover. Should be sown either 
during fall or early in spring. Six to 
eight pounds to an acre, 

liVhite ][>i«t€li Clover. A grass 
sown for pasturage at the rate of four to 
six pounds to the acre. Should be sown 
in fall and early spring. 

AlfafigVft or Ctiili Clover, or 
Freiicii Liuceraie. This variety does 
well here, but the ground has to be well 
prepared and deeply plowed. It will 
not do in low v>ret ground. Should be 
sown in the fall of the year, or January 
and February ; eight to ten pounds per 
acre. This being of special value I refer 
to the letter written by E. M. Hudson 
on the subject. (See latter part of this 
x'^.lmanac.) 

Keiitueiky Blue Oraiss. (Extra 
Cleaned.) Should be sown in dry soil. 
Two bushels per acre. 

Meadoiv Fescue, Festiica prate nsis. 
As a pasture grass I consider this one of 
the most valuable. It is not affected by 
dry weather, as its roots penetrate the 
earth 12 to 15 inches ; it is much relished 
by all kinds of stock on account of its 
long and tender leaves. It yields a 
very superior hay when cured. It has 
been grown very little in this country 
and is deserving of much more attention. 
Sow in spring or fall. Two bushels to the 
acre. In some sections it is called Kan- 
dall Grass. "This should not be con- 
founded with the English Rye Grass, 
offered by some dealers as the same 
variety. 

Orchard Orass. This is one of the 
best grasses for pasturing. It grows 
quickly, much more so than the Blue 
Grass. Can be sown either in fall or 
spring. Sow one to one and a half 
bushels per acre. (See extract from 
"Farmers' Book of Grasses.") 

Rescue Orass. A forage plant from 
•Australia. It grows during winter. Sow 
the seed in the fall of the year, but not 
before the weather gets cool, as it will 
not sprout so long as the ground is 
warm. Sow l-J bushels seed to the acre. 



Hung-ariaiB Grass. This is a valu- 
able annual forage plant, and good to 
make hay. Sow three pecks to the acre. 
It should be cut when in bloom. 

OeruMau Millet. Of all the Millets 
this is the best. It makes good hay, 
and produces heavily. Three pecks sown 
to the acre broad-cast secures a good 
stand. Can be sown from April till June 
but the former month is the best time. 
Should be cut the same as the foregoing 
kind. 

Rye. Is sown during the fall months 
as late as December, for forage ; and for 
pasturage, during winter and spring. 

Barley, Fall. Can be sown fall and 
winter, but requires strong, good soil. 
Used here for forage during its green 
state. 

Red or Rust Proof Oats. It is 
only a few years since these oats have 
come into general cultivation. They 
are very valuable, and will save a great 
deal of corn on a farm. The seed of this 
variety has a reddish cast, and a pecul- 
iar long beard, and is very heavy. It 
is the only kind Avhich will not rust in 
the Southern climate. They can be sown 
as early as October, but should be pas- 
tured down as soon as they commence 
to joint, till February. When the ground 
is low, or the season wet, this cannot 
well be done without destroying the 
whole crop. During January and Feb- 
ruary is the proper time, if no pasturing 
can be done. One to one and a half 
bushels per acre is sufficient. These 
oats have a tendency to stool, and there- 
fore do not require as much i^er acre as 
common oats. Those who have not al- 
ready tried this variety should do so. 

Sorg^ltum. Is planted for feeding 
stock during the spring and early sum- 
mer. For this i)urpose it should be sown 
as early in spring as possible in drills 
about two to three feet aj)art ; three to 
four quarts per acre. It makes excel- 
lent green fodder. 

I>l)BOuro, or Eg^yptian Corn. 
Sorghum vulgare. This is a well known 



82 



IICHARD FROTSOHF.Il'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



cereal. It produces a large quantity of 
seed, of which fowls and animals are 
fond.— Can also be sown broad-cast, for 
soilinjjf or in drills for fodder and seed. 
If sowed in drills, one peck of seed per 
acre is ample. If sown broad-cast, one 
bushel per acre. For grain, the stalks 
should not be nearer than 10 inches in 
the drill, but if to be cut repeatedly for 
soiling, it is better to sow quite thickly 
in the hills. Seed should not be sown 
too early, and covered from one half to 
one inch. If too much rain in the 
Spring, the seed v/ill not come well; — 
they require more heat than the other 
Sorghums. Rural Branching Sorghum 
or Millow Maize produces the seed heads 



upright in a vertical position, while the 
others are dropping. The seeds are 
smaller, but will keep longer than the 
other varieties. The stalk grows very 
large and produces a good many large 
leaves. It suckers and tillers more and 
more the oitener it is cut. It exceeds 
greatly in yield of green fodder any of 
the familiar fodder plants, except the 
"Teosinte."— It should be planted ex- 
clusively in drills four feet apart, IS to 
20 inches in the drills. 

UrooiH Covii. Can be planted the 
same as corn, put the hilJs closer to- 
gether in the row. Six quarts will plant 
an acre. 



The following extracts have been taken, by permission, from the author. Dr. 
D. L. Phares, from his book "Farmers" Book of Grasses." It is the most valu- 
able work of the kind ever published in the South, and should be in the hands of 
every one who takes an interest in the cultivation of grasses. 

Coi)ies for sale at publisher's price. Paper covers, 50 cents ; Cloth, 75 cents ; 
postage paid. 

ORCHARD GRASS. 

(Dactijliii 
Of all the grasses this is one of the 
most widely diffused, growing in Africa, 
Asia and every country in Europe and 
all our States. It is more highly es- 
teemed and commended than any other 
grass, by a larger number of farmers in 
most countries— a most decided proof 
of its great value and wonderful adap- 
tation to many soils, climates and treat- 
ments. Yet, strange to say, though 
growing in England for many centuries 
it was not appreciated in that country 
till carried here from Virginia in 1764. 
But, as in the case of Timothy, soon af- 
ter its introduction from America, it 
came into high favor among farmers, 
and still retains its hold on their esti- 
mation as a grazing and hay crop. 

Nor is this strange when its many ad- 
vantages and points of excellence are 
considered. It will grow well on any 
soil containing sufiacient clay and not 
holding too much water. If the land 
be too tenacious, drainage will remedy 
the soil; if worn out, a top dressing 
of stable manure will give it a good 



Glome rata.) 

send-off, and it will furnish several good 
mowings the first year. It grows well 
between 29 ^ and 48 ^ latitude. It may 
be mowed from two to four times a year, 
according to the latitude, season and 
treatment; yielding from one to three 
! tons of excellent hay per acre on poor 
I to medium land. In grazing and as 
hay, most animals select it in preference 
among mixtures in other grasses. In 
lovrer latitudes it furnishes good winter 
I grazing, as well as for spring, summer 
1 and fall. After grazing, or mowing, few 
grasses grow so rapidly (three or six 
inches per week), and are so soon ready 
again for tooth or blade. It is easily 
cured and handled. It is readily seeded : 
and catches with certainty. Its long,, 
deeply penetrating, fibrous roots enable 
it to sustain itself and grow vigorously 
during droughts that dry up other grass- 
' es, except tall oat grass, which has 
similar roots and characteristics. It 
grows well in open lands and in forests 
of large trees, the underbrush being all 
cleared off. I have had it grown luxu- 



FOli THE SOUTiJEKN STATES. 



83 



riantly even in beech woods, where the , any renewal on the same ground for 



roots are superficial, in the crotches of 
roots and close to the trunks of trees. 
The hay is of high quality, and the 
young grass contains a larger per cen- 
tage of nutritive digestable matter than 
any other grass. It thrives well without 



thirty-tive, nay forty years; how much 
longer, I am not able to say. It is 
easily exterminated when the land is 
desired for other crops. Is there any 
other grass for which so much can be 
saidV 



(Agro^U 

This is the best grass of England, 
the herd grass of the Southern States ; 
not in honor of any man, but probably, 
because so well adapted to the herd. It 
is called also Fine Top, Burden's and 
Borden's Grass. Varying greatly in 
characters, according to soil, location, 
climate and culture, some botanists 
have styled it A. Polyniorpha. It grows 
two to three feet high, and I have mown 
it when four feet high. It grows well 
on hill tops and sides, in ditches, gullies 
and marshes, but delights in moist 
bottom land. It is not injured by over- 
flows, though somewhat prolonged. In 
marshy land it produces a very dense, 
strong network of roots capable of sus- 
taining the weight of men and animals 
walking over it. 

It furnishes considerable grazing dur- 
ing warm "spells" in winter and in 
spring and summer an abundant supply 
of nutrition. It has a tendency, being 



RED TOP GRASS 

Vulgaris.) 



very hardy, to increase in density of 
growth and extent of surface, and will 
continue indefinitely, though easily 
subdued by the plow. 

Cut before maturing seed, it makes a 
good hay and large quantity. It seems 
to grow taller in the Southern States 
than it does further North, and to make 
more and better hay and grazing. Red 
Top and Timothy, being adapted to the 
same soil and maturing at the same 
time do well together, and produce an 
excellent hay. But the Red Top will 
finally root out Timothy, and if past- 
ured much it will do so sooner. 

Sow about two bushels (28 lbs.) per 
acre, if alone, in September, October, 
February, or March ; if with Timothy 
for hay, from 6 to 10 pounds ; if with 
other grasses for pasture, 3 to 5 pounds. 
It is an excellent pasture grass, and 
will grow on almost any kind of soil. 



KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS 

(Foa Pratensia.) 



This is also called smooth meadow 
grass, spear grass, and green grass, all 
three very appropriate, characteristic 
names. But Blue is a misnomer for 
this grass. It is not blue, but green as 
grass, and the greenest of grasses. The 
P.comxjressa, flat-stalked meadow grass, 
wire grass, blue grass is blue, 'the true 
blue' grass from which the genus re- 
ceived its trivial name. 

Kentucky blue grass, known also in 
the Eastern States as June grass, al- 
though esteemed in some parts of 
America as the best of all pasture grass- 
es, seems not to be considered very 



valuable among English farmers except 
in mixtures. It is certainly a very de- 
sirable pasture grass however. Its very 
narrow leaves, one, two or more feet 
long, are in such profusion, and cover 
the ground to such depth with their 
luxuriant growth, that a mere descrip- 
tion could give no one an adequate idea 
of its beauty, quantity, and value ; that 
is on rich land. On poor, sandy laud, 
it degenerates sadly, as do other things 
uncongenially located. 

Perennial, and bearing cold and 
drought well, it furnishes grazing a large 
part of the year. It is specially valuable 



84 



EICHASD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AMD O-AEDEX MANUAL 



as ii winter and sprinpr grass for the 
South. To securethe best winter results, 
it should be allowed a good growth in 
early fall, so that the ends of the leaves, 
being killed by the frost, afford an ample 
covering for the under-part which con- 
tinue to grow all winter, and afford a 
good bite whenever required by sheep, 
cattle, hogs and horses. In prolonged 
summer drought it dries completely, so 
that, if fired, it would burn off clean. 
But this occurs in Kentucky, where in- 
deed it has seemed without fire, to dis- 
appear utterly; yet, when rain came, 
the bright green spears promptly re- 
carpeted the earth. 

With its uudergrouDd stems and many 
roots, it sustains the heat and drought 
of the Southern States as well as those 
of Kentucky, where indeed it is sub- 
jected to severer trials of this kind than 
in the more Southern States. In fact, 
it bears the vicissitudes of our climate 
about as well as Bermuda grass, and is 
nearly as nutritious. 

Blue grass grows well on hill tops, 
or bottom lands, if not too wet and too 
poor. It may be sown any time from 
September to April, preferably perhaps 
in the latter half of February, or early 
in March. The best catch I ever had 
was sown the 20th of March, on un- 
broken land, from which trash, leaves, 
etc., had just been burned. The surface 
of the land should be cleaned of trash 
of all kinds, smooth, eveji ; and if re- 



cently plowed and harrowed, it should', 
be rolled also. The last proceeding is 
for compacting the surface in order to 
prevent the seed from sinking too deep 
in the ground. Without harrowing or 
brushing in, many of them get in too 
deep to come up, even when the surface 
of the laud has had the roller over it. 
The first rain after seeding will put them 
in deep enough, as the seeds are very 
minute, and the spears of grass small as 
fine needles, and therefore unable to 
get out from under heavy cover. These 
spears are so small as to be invisible, 
except to close examination ; and in 
higher latitudes, this condition con- 
tinues through the first year. Thus, 
some who have sown the blue grass 
seed, seeing the first year no grass, 
imagine they have been cheated, plant 
some other crop, and probaljly lose 
what close inspection would have shown 
to be a good catch. This, however, is 
not apt to occur in the Southern tier of 
States, as the growth here is more rapid. 
The sowing mentioned above, made on 
the 20th of March, came up promptly, 
and in three months the grass was from 
six to ten inches high. One year here 
gives a finer growth and show than two 
in Kentucky, or any other State so far 
North. 

Sown alone, 2u to 26 pounds, that is 2 
bushels, should be used ; in mixtures, i 
to 6 pounds. 



ENGLISH OR PERE 

[LoliKm 
This is the first grass cultivated in 
England over two centuries ago, and at 
a still more remote i)eriod in France. 
It was long more widely known and 
cultivated than any other grass, became 
adapted to a great variety of soils and 
conditions, and a vast number (seventy 
or more) of varieties produced, some of 
which were greatly improved, while 
others were inferior and became 
annuals. Introduced into the United 
States in the first quarter of the current 
centur3% it has never become very 



NNIAL RYE GRASS. 

Perenne.) 
popular, although shown by the sub- 
joined analysis of Way not to be de- 
ficient in nutritive matter. In 100 parts 
of the dried grass cut in bloom were 
albuminoids 11.85, fatty matters 3.17, 
heat-producing principles 42.24, wood 
fibre 35.20, ash 7.54. The more recent 
analysis of Wolff and Knopp, allowing 
for water, gives rather more nutritive 
matter than this. 

It grows rapidly, and yields heavy 
crops of seed ; makes good grazing, and 
good hay. But, as with all the Eye 



•«raH THE SOUl'HKiiN STATES. 



m 



grasses, to make good hay, it must be 
cut before passing the blossom stage, as 
after that it deteriorates rapidly. The 
roots being sliort, it does not bear 
drought well, and exhausts the soil, 
dying out in a few years. In these re- 
spects it is liable to the same objections 
as Timothy. The stem, one to two feet 



high, has four to si.x: purplisl: joints and 
as many dark green leaves ; the flexious 
spiked panicle, bearing tne distant 
spikelets, one in each bend. 

It should be sown in August or Sej)- 
tember, at the rate of tweaty-five or 
thirty pounds, or one bushel seed per 
acre. 



TALL MEADOW OAT GRASS 



(ArrJieiiatherum 
Evergreen grass in Virginia, and other 
Southern States, and it is the Tall Oat 
(Avena elatior) of Lin tens. It is closely 
related to the common oat, and has a 
beautiful open panicle, leaning slightly 
ta one side. "Spikelets two flowered, 
and a rudiment of a third, open ; lowest 
flower staminate or sterile, with a long 
bent awn below the middle of the back." 
— Tiint.) 

It is widely naturalized and well adapt- 
ed to a great variety of soils. On sandy, 
or gravelly soils, it succeeds admirably, 
growing tw^o or three feet high. On 
rich, dry upland it grows from five to 
seven feet high. It has an abundance 
of perennial, long fibrous roots, pene- 
trating deeply in the soil, being, there- 
fore, less affected by drought or cold, 
and enabled to yield a large quantity 
of foliage, winter and summer. These 
advantages render it one of the very best 
grasses for the South, both for grazing 
(being evergreen) and for hay, admitting 
of being cut twice a year. It is probably 
the best winter grass that can be ob- 
tained. 

It will make twice as much hay as 
Timothy, and containing a greater 
quantity of albuminoids and less of heat- 
producing principles, it is better adapted 
to the uses of the Southern farmer, 
while it exhausts the surface soil less, 
and may be grazed indefinitely, except 
after mowing. To make good hay it 



Avenaceum.) 

must be cut the instant it blooms, and, 
after being cut, must not get wet by dew 
or rain, which damages it greatly in 
quality and appearance. 

For green soiling, it may be cut four 
or five times with favorable seasons. 
In from six to ten days after blooming, 
the seeds begin to ripen and fall, the 
upper ones first. It is, therefore, a little 
troublesome to save the seed. As soon 
as those at the top of the panicle ripen 
sufficiently to begin to drop, the heads 
should be cut off and dried, when the 
seeds will all thresh out readily and be 
matured. After the seeds are ripe and 
taken ofi', the long abundant leaves and 
stems are still green, and being mowed 
make good hay. 

It may be sown in March or April, 
and mowed the same season; but for 
heavier yield, it is better to sow in Sep- 
tember or October. Along the more 
southernly belt, from the 31 '^ i)arallel 
southward, it may be sown in November 
and onward till the middle of December. 
Whenever sown it is one of the most 
certain grasses to have a good catch. 
Not less than tAvo bushels (ii pounds) 
per acre should be sown. Lik^ Timothy, 
on inhospitable soils, the root may 
sometimes become bulbous. The aver- 
age annual nutrition yielded by this 
grass in the Southern belt, is probably 
twice as great as in Pennsylvania and 
other Northern States. 



JOHNSON GRASS. 

iSorgh am halapen.^e.) 

This has been called Cuba grass, 1 ever, to call it Johnson grass, and leave 
Egyptian grass, Means giass, Alabama the name Guinea grass for the Pauicum 
and Guinea grass, etc. ianientoy^nm, to which it properly be- 
lt seems pretty Av^ell agreed now\ how- I loners. 



86 



RICHASD FEOTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAl 



It is true that in Mr. Howard's pam- 
phlet, as well as in many periodicals and 
books, and in letters and common usaj?e, 
this grass has heen far more generally 
called Guinea grass than the trueGuinea 
grass itself; thus causing vast confusion. 
It is, therefore, assuredly time to call 
each by its right name. Johnson grass 
is perennial and has cane-like roots, or 
more properly, underground stems, 
from the size of a goose-quill to that of 
the little finger. These roots are tender, 
and hogs are fond of and thrive on them 
in winter. The roots literally fill the 
ground near the surface, and every joint 
is capable of developing a bud. Hence 
the grass is readily propagated from 
root cutting. It is also propagated from 
the seeds, but not always so certainly ; 
for in some localities many faulty seeds 
are produced, and in other places no 
seeds are matured. Before sowing the 
seeds, therefore, they should be tested, 
as should all grass seeds* indeed, in order 
to know what proportion will germinate, 
and thus what quantity per acre to sow. 
One bushel of a good sample of this seed 
is sufficient for one acre of land. 

The leaf, stalk and panicle of this 
grass resemble those of other sorghums. 
It grows on any land where corn will 
grow ; and like the latter, the better the 
land the heavier the crop. On rich land 
the culms attain a size of over half an 
inch in diameter, and a height of seven 
feet. It should be cut while tender, 
and then all live stock are fond of it; 
for a few weeks are sufficient to render 
it so coarse and hard that animals refuse 
it, or eat sparingly. 

A few testimonials are here quoted to 
give an idea of the productiveness and 
value of this plant. In a letter published 
in the Riiral Ca-roUnian for 187i, Mr. N. 
E. Moore, who had for more than fortv 



years grown crops, speaks of this grass 
under the name of Guinea grass. 

■'My meadow consists of one hundred 
acres of alluvial land, near Augusta. 
* * * In winter I employ but four men, 
who are enough to work my packing- 
press ; in summer, when harvesting, 
double that number. In autumn I 
usually scarify both ways wirh sharp, 
steel-toothed harrows, and sow over the 
stubble a peck of red clover per acre, 
which, with volunteer vetches, cooies 
off about the middle of May. The second 
yield of clover is uniformly eaten up by 
grasshoppers. The top root remains to 
fertilize the then coming Guinea grass, 
which should be but from two to three 
feet high. * * * On such land as 
mine, it will afford three or four cuttings 
if the season is propitious. I use an 
average of five tons of gypsum soon 
after the first cutting, and about the 
same quantity of the best commercial 
fertilizers, in March and April. * * * 
The grass, which is cut before noon, is 
put up with horse sulky rakes, in cocks, 
before sun-down."' 

Mr. Moore's income from this field 
v\^as from seven thousand to ten thou- 
sand dollars a year. 

Mr. Goelsel, of Mobile, says : "It is 
undoubtedly the most i)roiitable soiling 
plant yet introduced, and also promises 
to be the plant for our Southern hay 
stacks, provided it can be cut every 
three or four weeks." 

Note.— Recognizing all the above, I 
would say, that great care must be taken 
not to sow this grass near cultivated 
lands. If done, it should not be allowed 
to go to seed, as the wind will blow them 
off from the stalks, and when it gets 
amongst cane or other crops it causes 
a great deal of trouble. It is ahriost im- 
possible to get it out of the land. 



RESCUE GRASS. 

( Ceratochloa au^itralls or Brornuti Schraderi.) 



It is an annual winter grass. It varies 
in the tim^ of starting growth. I has'e 
seen it ready for mowing the first of 
October and furnish frequent cuttings 
till April. Again, it may not start be- 



fore January, nor be ready to cut till 
February. This depends upon the 
moisture and depression of temperature. 
When once started, its growth, after 
the successive cuttings or grazings, is 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



87 



very rapid. Il is tender, very sweet, 
and stock eat it greedily. It makes also 
a good hay. It I'.roduees an inimeiise 
quantity oi' leaves. On loose soil some 
of it may be pulled out by animals graz- 
ing it. I have seen it bloom as early as 
November when the season had favored 
it, and no grazing or cutting were per- 
mitted. Ortener it makes little start 
before January. But whether late or 
early starting, it may be grazed or 
mowed frequently, until April, it still 
will mature seed. It has become natu- 
ralized in limited portions of Texas, 



Louisiana, Mississip[)i, Alabama, and 
perhaps other States. It is a very pretty 
grass in all its stages ; and esjjecially so 
when the culms, two or three feet high, 
are gracefully bending the v.eight of the 
diffuse panicle with its many [>e<licelled 
flattened spikelets, each an inch or more 
long and with twelve to sixteen flowers. 
I would not, however, ad\ise sowing 
this grass on p-oor land with the expec- 
tation of getting a remunerative return. 
It tillers abundantly under favorable 
conditions. 



JAPAN CLOVER. 



{Le^pedeza 
There is now so much enquiry about 
this plant, so much confusion, lack of 
knowledge and confounding with or 
mistaking for it another worthless na- 
tive sf-ecies, and also the same errors 
in regard to a small genuine clover, 
that it is deemed proper to give some 
correct information on the subject. 

HISTORY. 

To botanists this i)lant has been 
known for many generations in its 
native habitat in China and other 
eastern parts of Asia, Finding its 
w^ay to Japan it encountered congenial 
climate and soil, and rapidly spread 
over the entire country occupying all 
waste i)lace3, which it has continued 
to possess and improve for much more 
than a century. Hero as on the con- 
tinent, it was of dwarfish habit and 
received a name indicative of the fact. 

Finally a few seeds, arriving in the 
United States, germinated, contested, 
a few feet of soil with other juitive and 
exotic plan Is that had long pre-occu- 
pied the land. 

It gained strength and increased in 
yield of seed till becoming somewhat 
abundant, it commenced its westward 
invasion, simultaneously extending its 
conquests northward and southward, 
firmly holding all cr)n'quered territory. 
Since 187U its strides westward have 
been immense. It now extends from 
the Atlantic seaboard across the Mis- 
sissipi:i, and its out-i)Osts are pushed 



Striata.) 

far towards the western border of 
Texas. 

Denuded, soil-less hill tops, sandy 
plains, gravelly slopes, bottoms and 
banks of washes and gullies, pine 
thickets, open woods, fields, dry and 
damp soils, all seem as it! si)ecially 
created for its home. It seizes upon all 
with equal facility. 

It maintains its dwarfish habit on 
sands, gravels and other spots too poor 
to produce any other vegetation, densely 
covering the surface with its green robe 
and alTording delighted live stock with 
delicious nutiitious grazing for four to 
eight mouths of the year. But on richer 
soil it doffs the d\varf and dons the tree 
style justifying the American name of 
"bush clover," sending its long tap root 
deep down in the subsoil and its stem 
two 1o three feet up into the light and 
air, with its many branches thickly set 
with leaves, inviting tooth and blade. 

It attains here on rich or medium soil 
}>rotected from live stock a magnitude 
that could not have been imagined by 
one seeing it in its far eastern home. It 
takes i)Ossession not only of unoccui'ied 
land and pine thickets but grows among 
sedges, grasses, briers and weeds, com- 
l)letely eradicating many , species of 
jioxious grasses and weeds. It subdues 
even broom grass and holds equal con- 
test v'^ith Berujuda grass ; in son:ie local- 
ities one yielding, in other localities the 
other succumbing, while in other spots 



?<^ 



EiCHASD fP.OtSCHEES ALMaNTAC A^'D GAEr)E^■ 3lA::rAL 



both niaintaiQ equal possession ; or one 
year one may seem to rule, and the next 
year thr? other. 

TALrE. 

On sands, s^ravels, or denuded clay 
hill tops no other plant known to me is 
so valuable for .^rrazing. Taking a suc- 
cession of ten years, the same assertion 
would not be far out of the way for rich 
lands while few forage plants on these 
would yield sd much or so valuable hay. 

The analysis of red clover gives 16 per 
cent albuminoids and 41 carbohydrates. 
The average of two analyses of .Jai-an 
clover gives 15.85 albuminoids and 56 
carbohydrates, placing it above red 
clover in nutritive value. It is 

SUPEEI03 TO OTHER FOEAGE PLANTS, 

in several important particulars not 
generally observed by the careless 
stock-man. 1. The growing plant con- 
tains less moisture than any other very 
valuable forage plant with perhaps a 
single exception. Hence we never hear 
of animals having hoven or bloat or 
scours from eating this plant as when 
they have free access to red clover, peas 
and many grasses. 2. We have never 
yet found on the Japan clover any 
fungous growths which are so common 
on other plants as to cause many deaths 
annually among animals grazing on 
them or fed with the hay. 3. Heavy graz- 
ing for a few weeks destroys the clovers, 
lucerne and most of the grasses, while 
this plant may be grazed however close- 
ly, whether the season be wet or pro- 
longed drouth prevail, without damage. 

4. There is less difficulty of obtaining a 
catch with this plant than most others. 
The Seed may be scattered on bare, 
poor, barren ground, rich soil, among 
weeds and dead grass or in March on 
small grain sown the previous autumn 
or winter and a catch will be obtained. 

5. The grain being harvested v^4le^ 
ripe does not injure the Lesi<edeza ; 
which is ready for the mower through 
September and October. 6. It is more 
easily cured than the clovers, pea ^dnes 
and many grasses. 7. It does not lose 
the foliage in curing as do clovers, peas 
and some other plants. 8- It furnishes 



good grazing from May, some years last 
of March till killed by frost in October 
or XoA^ember. 

PfiODUCT OF HAY. 

On medium to good land ii ranges 
from one to three tons per acre; and 
this may be obtained after having dur- 
ing the summer harvested from the same 
land a good crop of grain and straw. 

QUALITY. 

Some of our farmers, who have been 
mowing Lespedeza striata for live to ten 
years regard it as the soundest, best, 
most wholesome and palatable hay the}' 
ever used. These mowings have ranged 
from two to three hundred tons on 
single farms in one season. Yet no 
complaint as to quality, or relish of 
animals for it, or as to its nutritive 
value and good effect on the stock has 
ever reached us. Those who have used 
it longest and in largest quantities and 
kept animals— cattle, sheep, horses and 
mules— in best conditio.n commend it 
most. We have now before us a beauti- 
ful sample of this hay from Louisiana 
being from a crop of perhaps 300 tons 
mowed last autumn. 

SEEDING. 

A measured half bushel of seed per 
acre may be sown broad-cast the first 
week in March south of parallel 32 <^ of 
latitude, a few days later as we proceed 
northward for each degree or two. Sown 
in the fall or winter it springs up, but 
freezes often throw it out and destroy 
it. As already stated it germinates and 
grows well on land in any condition, if 
the surface is not so loose as to let the 
seed sink too deep. When land has been 
prepared for or sown in grain, the winter 
rains ]Mit it in about the best condition 
for growing this plant for heavy crops 
of hay. 

All our ivuiarks on this plant, as 
found in our Southern States, are based 
on what we have seen and learned of it 
in a belt lying between 30^=^ and 34 '^ of 
latitude. 

The only 

COMPLETE PEOOF 

of the value of a forage plant is found in 
the concurrence of chemical analysis 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATP:S. 



89 



and the observation and experience of 
the stockman. When the relish of an 
, animal for the forage is keen, the health 
j preserved and improved, growth pro- 
moted, a maximum quantity of excellent 
beef or mutton or pork, and, if superior' 
milk and butter, are obtained, we cer- 
j tainly have an adnairable food plant. 
The judgment of the cow, the convic- 
tions of the farmer arising from his 
experiences independent of, and indeed 
in utter ignorance of any chemical 
; analysis, confirming the decisions of the 
! chemist, give us the best of all evidences 
of the value of forage. And all these 
we have in this case. Japan clover is 
also a great 

AMELIORATOR AND FERTILIZER. 

Its abundant, long tap-roots decaying 
render the soil porous and leave in it 
much nitrogenous material and humus. 
It releases and brings up from the sub- 



soil valuable plant food ; the ashes con - 
taining nearly 40 per cent, potash, 29.- 
60 oxide lime, 7.82 suli)huric acid, 7.54 
phosphoric acid -all inost valuable ele. 
ments in plant life and growth. Soils 
are thus renovated, slopes prevented 
from washing, gullies tilled, moisture 
solicited and retained, atmospheric fer- 
tilizers gathered and garnered ; bald ^ 
barren wastes covered with living green 
to fill the stomach, delight the eve and 
cheer the heart. 

It should have been stated that this 
plant has eradicated over large areas 
the much detested helenium or bitter 
weed, which so often damages the flavor 
of the milk of cows eating it while 
grazing. It is believed that it exterroi- 
nates also two or three plants that are 
fatally poisonous to cattle and horses. 

Price, per bushel of 25 lbs,. S5 • k bush., 
$3.00 ; per pound, 30 cts. 



BURR CLOVER. 

{Medicago Macula ta.) 



This variety of clover was brought 
from Chili to California, and thence to 
the States, under the name of California 
Clover. It is often taken for Lucerne, 
which name is wrongly applied. The 
Burr Clover has only two or three yellow 
blossoms in each cluster, while Lucerne 
has many blue blossoms in an elongated 
head. It furnishes good grazing from 



February till April or May. It is good 
for grazing and hay. As there is no way 
for removing th^ seeds from the pods of 
spotted medic, it is necessary to sow 
the burr like pods, say one-half bushel 
per acre. The planting should be done 
early in fall, so the pods may have time 
to rot and release the seeds. Should be 
covered very lightly. 



BERMUDA GRASS. 



(Cynodon Dactylon.) 



Almost every body living in this section 
of the country knows this grass ; it is 
planted as a Lawn grass, and nothing 
will stand the sun better, or will make 
a prettier carpet, when kept short, than 
this grass. It is also very valuable as a 
pasture and hay grass. It is only lately 
that I have been able to obtain the seed 



propagated by the roots. Six pounds 
will sow an acre. Should be planted in 
spring, but can also be sown later. Un- 
der the most favorable circumstances it 
takes from 20 to 25 days to sprout; 
requires damp weather and hot sun : but 
when once up it grows verv rapidly. 



90 



RICHARD TROTSCHER S ALMaXaC AXD GARDEN MANUAL 



DIRECTIONS FOR PLANTLNG. 



The directions given here are for the Southern part of Louisiana. If applied 
to localities North of here, the time of planting will not be quite so early in spring, 
and earlier in fall. For instance : the directions for January will answer for Feb- 
ruary in the Northern part of this State, and Southern i -art of Mississippi or Arkan- 
sas. In autumn, directions for September can be followed ia August. In those 
sections, very little can be planted in November and December. 



JANUARY 



Sow Spinach, Mustard, Carrots, Beets, 
Parsnips and Leeks, the early varieties 
of Eadish, and for the last crop, the 
Elack Spanish. 

Sow Spring and Purple Top. Turnip. 
Euta Baga may also be sown, for table 
use later in spring. 

Sow Lettuce, Endive, Cabbage, Broc- 
coli, Kohlrabi, an-l early Cauliflower : 
the best sown Iq a frame to be trans- 
planted next month. 

Cress, Chervil, Parsley and Celery for 
cutting, should be sown this mouth. 
Sow Eoquette and Sorrel. 

If the hot-bed has not been prepared 
already, make it at once to sow Egg- 
Plaut, Pepper and Tomatoes. 

AH kinds of Herb seed may be sown 
during this month. Plant Peas for a 
general crop, towards the end of the 
month the Extra Early varieties may 
be planted. 

Plant Potatoes, but the Early Eose 
should not be planted before the latter 
end of this month. 



Divide and transplant Shallots. 
Transplant Cabbage plants sown in 
November. Onions, if not already set 
out, shotild be hurried with now, so they 
may have time to bulb. Those who de- 
sire to raise Onion sets, should sow the 
seed towards the end of this month, as 
they may be used for setting out early 
in the fall, and can be sold sooner than 
those raised from seed. Creole seed is 
the only kind which can be used to raise 
sets from. Northern seed will not make 
sets. This I know from experience. 
Asparagus roots should be set out this 
month. 

Eed Oats can be sown. I consider 
these and the German Millet the two 
best annual forage plants for Louisiana. 
—Cucumbers can be planted in the hot- 
bed; they are mostly i^lanted here dur- 
ing November and December, but if the 
hot-bed is properly made, those planted 
in this month will bear better than 
those I'lanted in November. 



FEBRUARY 



All winter vegetables can be sown this 
month, such as Spinach, Mustard, Car- 
rots, Beets, Parsnips and Leeks. Also, 
the early varieties of Eadishes and 
Spring and Purple Top Turnip, Swiss 
Chard and Kohlrabi. 

Sow, for succession, Lettuce, Cabbage 
and early Caiilifiower : if the season is 
favorable, and the month ot April not 
too dry, the latter may succeed. 

Cauliflower and Cabbage plants 
should be trans]jlanted : Shallots divid- 
ed and set out again. 

Sow Sorrel, Eoquette. Chervil, Pars- 
lej, Cress and Celery for seasoning. 



Peas of all kinds can be planted, es- 
pecially the early varieties. The late 
kinds should be sown in January, but 
they may be planted during this month. 

This is the time to plant the general 
crop of Potatoes. On an average they 
will succeed better when planted during 
this, than during any other month. 

Herb seeds should be planted ; tender 
varieties best sown in a frame, and 
trausidanted into the open ground af- 
tei-wards. 

A5[)aragu3 roots should be planted; 
this is the proper month to sow the seed 
of this vegetable. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



91 



Plants in the hot-bed will require at- j 
tention ; give air when the sun shines, I 
and the weather is pleasant. If too | 
thick, thin out, so thev may become | 
sturdj'. I 

Bush Beans can be commnncod with I 
this month ; Cucumbers, Squash and j 
Melons may be tried, as they often suc- 
ceed ; if protected by small boxes, as 
most gardeners protect them, there is 
no risk at all. 

Corn can be planted towards the end 



of this month. For market, the Adams 
Extra Early and Early White Flint are 
planted. I recommend the Sugar va- 
rieties for family use; they are just as 
large as those mentioned, and Stowel's 
Evergreen is as large as any variety 
grown. 

Mangel Wurzel and Sugar Beet should 
be sown in this month for stock. Sweet 
Potatoes can be put in a bed for sprout- 
ing, so as to have early slips. 



MARCH. 



Sow Beets, Radish, Cabbage, early 
varieties; Kohlrabi, Lettuce, Spinach 
Mustard, Carrots, Swiss Chard and 
Leek. 

Also, Celery for cutting. Parsley, 
Roquette, Cress and Chervil. The lat- 
ter part of the month sow Endive. Of 
Lettuce, the Royal Cabbage and Perpig- 
nan ; the White Coss is a favorite varie- 
ty for spring; the Butterhead will run 
into seed too quickly, and should not be 
sown later than the middle of February 
in this latitude. 

Plant a full supply of Bush and Pole 
Beans. For Lima Beans better to wait 
till towards the end of the month, as 
they rot easily when the ground is not 
warm enough, or too wet. 

Squash, Cucuixibers, Melons and Okra 
can be planted. The remark in regard 
to Lima Beans holds good for Okra. 
Early varieties of Peas may still be 
planted. 

Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Peppers 
can be set out in the open ground, and 
seed sown for a later crop. Plant Sweet 
Corn. 

AP 



Potatoes can be planted; all depends 
upon the season. Some years they do 
as well as those planted during last 
month. 

Beans are hard to keei) in this climate, 
and therefore very few are planted for 
shelling purposes. With a little care, 
however, they can be kept, but they 
ought not to be [)lanted before the first 
of August, so that they may ripen when 
the v/eather gets cooler. When the 
! season is favorable leave them out till 
dry; gather the pods and expose them 
a few days to the sun. It is best to shell 
them at once, and after they are shelled 
put them to air and sun again for a few 
days longer. Sacks are better to keep 
them in than barrels and boxes. The 
Red and White Kidney are generally 
the varieties used for drying. Beans 
raised in spring are hard to kee]:>, and if 
intended for seed they should be put up 
in bottles, or in tin boxes, and a little 
camphor sprinkled between them. 

Sweet Potatoes should be planted. 



RIL 



Sow Bush, Pole and Lima Beans, 
Sweet Corn, Cucumbers, Squash, Melons 
and Okra. 

Beets Carrots, Swiss Chard, Radish, 
Lettuce, Mustard, Endive, Roquette, 
Cress, Parsley, Chervil and Celery for 
cutting. j 

Sow Tomatoes, Egg Plants and Pepper { 
for succession. It is rather late to sow I 
Cabbage seed now, but if sown, the I 



early varieties only can be successfully 
used. Kohlrabi can still be sown, but 
it is best to sow it thinly in drills a foot 
apart, and thin out to four inches in the 
rows. 

Towards the end of this montli a 
sowing of the late Italian Giant Cauli- 
flower can be made. It is very large, 
and takes from eight to nine months 
before it matures, so it has to be sown 



92 



eichaed teotschee's al^.iaxac and g-aeden manual 



early, Ir is always best to make a. 
couple of sowings, so that in case oae 
should fail the other may be used. This 
variety is hardier than the French and 
German kinds. A good plan is to sow 
the seed in boxes, elevated two feet or 
more above the ground, as it will keep ! 
the eabbage-flv of. The plants should i 
be overlooked daily, and all green cab- : 
bage worms or other vermin removed. 

Sweet Potato Slips, for early crop, j 
can be planted out. Early Irish Pota- 
toes will be fit to dig now, and the ground 
they are taken out of may be planted 
with Corn, Beans, Squash, etc. 



Sow Pumpkins of both kinds, the 
Field and ihe Cashaw. 

German Millet should be sown this 
month. The ground ought to be v*'ell 
plowed and harrowed. Three peeks of 
seed is the quantum to be sown per acre. 
It will be well to roll the ground after 
sowing, and the seed will require no 
other covering. If no roller is handy, 
some brush tied together ought to be 
passed over the ground sown. For hay, 
it should be cut when in flower Every 
planter should give it a trial. 



MAY. 



Yery few varieties of vegetables can 
be sown during this month. Many of 
the winter varieties will not do well if 
sown now. The ground should uovr be 
occupied wiih growing crops. 

Where Potatoes and Onions are taken 
up, Corn, Melons, Cucumbers. Squash 
and Pumpkins may be planted. 

Nothing of the Cabbage kind, except 
the Creole Cabbage seed, can be sown 
this month. It is supposed to stand the 
heat better than other varieties, but it 
makes only loose heads and runs up to 
seed as early as the end of November, . 

Yellow and white summer Eadish and 
Endive should be sown. Lettuce re- 
quires much water during hot weather, 
and, if neglected, will become hard and 
tasteless. The Perpignan is the best 
kind for summer use. Okra can still be 
sown. 

The first sowing of White Solid Celery 
is to be made this month. The seed 
requires to be shaded, and, if the 
weather is dry. should be regularly 



watered. Late Italian Cauliflower 
should be sown. 

Cow Peas can be planted between the 
corn, or the crowders in rows ; the latter 
are the best to be used green. If they 
are sown for fertilizing purposes, they 
are sown one bushel per acre, and 
plowed under when the ground is well 
covered ; or sometimes they are left till 
fall, when the^' commence to decay and 
then plowed down. 

Sweet Potato Slips can be set our, 
taking advantage of an occasional raiu ; 
if it does not rain they have to be 
watered. The top of Shallots will com- 
mence to get dry; this indicates that 
they are fit to take up. Pull them up 
and expose to the sun for a few days, 
and then store them away in a dry, airy 
place, taking care not to lay them too 
thick, as they are liable to heat. Lima 
or Pole Beans can be planted ; the 
Southern Prolific is the best variety for 
late planting. 



JUNE. 



This month is similar to the last, that 
is, not a great deal can be sc'wn. The 
growing crops will require attention, as 
weeds grow fast. Plant Corn for the last 
supply of roasting ears. A few Water 
and Musk Melons may be planted. 
Cucumbers, Squash and Pumpkins 
planted this month generally do very 
well, but the first requires an abundance 
of water if the w^eather is drv. 



Southern Prolific Pole Beans may be 
planted during this month. Continue 
to set out Sweet Potato vines. 

Sow Yellow and White Summer Kad- 
ish; sow Endive for Salad; this is raised 
more easily than the Lettuce. 

Lettuce can be sown, but it requires 
more care than most people are willing 
to bestow. Soak the seeds forhalf an 
hnnv in water, take them out an-l put 



an TM£ iSOUTHEKM STATJi;«. 



m 



them in a piece of clotli, and place in a 
coo] spot- under the cistern, or, if con- 
venient, in an ice box. Keep the cloth 
moist, and in two or three days the 
seeds will sprout. Then sow them ; best 
to do S3 in the eveaing, and give a 
watering. 

If the seed is sown without being 
sprouted, ants will be likely to carry it 
away before it can germinate, and the 
seedsman be blamed for selling seeds 
that did not grow. This sprouting has 
to be done from May to September, 
depending upon the weather. Should 
thfe weather be moist and cool in the 
fall, it can be dispensed with. Some 
sow late Cabbage for winter crop in this 
month, saying the plants are easier 



raised during this than the two following 
I months. I consider this month too soon ; 
I plants will become too hard and long- 
! legged before they can be planted out. 
I This is the last mont h to sow the Late 
I Italian Cauliflower; towards the end 
I the Early Italian Giant Cauliflower can 
j be sown. Some cultivators transplant 
them, when large enough, at once into 
the open ground; others i)lant them 
first into flowerpots and transplant 
them into the ground later. If trans- 
planted at this time, they will require 
to be shaded for a few days, till they 
commence to grow. 

Sow^ Tomatoes for late crop d uring the 
latter part of this month. 



JULY 



• Plant Pole Beans ; also, Bush Beans, 
towards the end of the month. Sov^r 
Tomatoes in the early part for the last 
crop. Some Corn for roasting ears may 
still be planted. Cucumbers can be 
planted for pickling. Early Giant Cau- 
liflower can be sown. Sow Endive, Let- 
tuce, Yellow and White Summer Radish. 
Where the ground is new, some Turnips 
and Euta Bagas can be sowm. Cabbage 
should be commenced with after the 
15th of this month ; Superior Flat Dutch, 
Improved Drumhead, St. Denis, or 
Bonneuil and Brunswick are the leading- 
kinds. It is hard to say w^hich is the 
best time to sow, as our seasons differ so 
much— some seasons we get frost early, 
other seasons not before January. Cab- 
bage is most easily hurt by frost when 
it is half grown ; w^hen the plants are 
small, or when they are headed u]^, frost 
does not hurt much. It is ahvays good 
to make two or three sowings. As a 
general thing, plants raised from seeds 
sown in July and August, give the most 
satisfaction ; they are almost certain to 
head. September, in my experience, is 
the most ticklish month ; as the seed 
sown in that month is generally only 
half grown when we have some frosts, 
and therefore, more liable to be hurt. 
But there are exceptions. Some years 
ago the seed sown in September turned 
out best. Seed sown at the end of Oc- 
tober and during November generally 



give good results. November is the 
proper month to sow^ for shipping. The 
surest way to sow^ is in a cold frame, to 
protect the plants from frosts 'which 
sometimes occur in December and Jan- 
uary. January, and the early part of 
February, is early enough to set out. 
Brunswick and Excelsior are the earli- 
est of the large growing kinds, and it 
should be sown in July and August, so 
that it may be headed up wdien the cold 
comes, as it is more tender than the Flat 
Dutch and Drumhead. The same may 
be said in regard to the St. Denis. All 
cabbages require strong, good soil ; but 
these two varieties particularly. Bruns- 
wick makes also a very good spring- 
cabbage when sown at the end of Octo- 
ber. The standard varieties, the Supe- 
rior Flat Dutch and Improved Drum- 
head, should be sovv^n at the end of this 
month and during next. It is better to 
sow plenty of seeds than to be short of 
plants. I would prefer one hundred 
plants raised in July and August, to four 
times that amount raised in September. 
It is very hard to protect the young 
plants from ravages of the fly. Strong 
tobacco water is as good as anything 
else for this purpose, or tobacco stems 
cut fine and scattered over the ground 
will keep them off to some extent. As 
the plants have to be watered, the smell 
of the tobacco will drive the flies away. 



9i 



KICHAliD FI.OTSCHEn'S ALT.IANAC AND GARDEX MANUAL 



AUG 

This is a very active moiitii for garden- 
ing in the South. Plant Bush Beans, 
Extra Early and Washington Peas. Sow 
late Cabbp^ges and Drumhead Savoy, 
also Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts and 
Kale. The Early Italian Giant Cauli- 
flower may still be sown ; but now is 
the proper time to sow the Half Early 
Paris, Asiatic and other early varieties. 

Sow Parsley, Eoquette Chervil, Let- 
tuce, Endive and Sorrel ; but, in case of 
dry weather, these seeds v/iil have to be 
watered frequently. 

Continue to sow Yellow Turnip Ead- 
ishes, and commence to sow red varie- 
ties, such as Scarlet Turnip, Half Long 
Erench and Long Scarlet. 

Towards the end of the month the 
Black Spanish Kadish can be sown ; 
also, Swiss Chard. 

Sow Mustard and Cress; the former 
will generally do well. All kinds of 
Turnips and Euta Bagas should be 
sown ; also, Kohlrabi. 



UST. 

The seed of ail kinds of Beets should 
be put in the ground. 

Towards the end of the month Carrots 
can be sown ; but the sowing of all 
vegetables at this time of the year de- 
pends much upon the season. If we 
should have hot and dry weather, it is 
useless to do much, as seed cannot come 
up without being watered. White Solid 
Celery should be sown for a succession, 
and the Dwarf kinds for spring use. 

Shallots can be set out during this 
month ; also, Onit)n Sets especially if 
they are raised from Creole seed. The 
early part of the month is the proper 
time to plant Bed and White Kidney 
Beans, for shelling and drying for win- 
ter use. 

Early Eose and other varieties of Po- 
tatoes should be planted early this 
month for a winter crop, and the latest 
of Tomato i:)lants should be set out, if 
not done last month. If Celery plants 
are set out during this month, they re- 
quire to be shaded. 



SEPTEMBER 



Most of the seeds recommended for 
last month can be sov/n this month, and 
some more added. 

In the early part, Bush Beans can be 
planted, as they will bear before frost 
comes. Plant Extra Early and early 
varieties of Peas. Sow Eadishes of all 
kinds. Carrots, Beets, Parsnip, Salsify, 
Eoquette, Chervil, Parsley, Sorrel, 
Cress, Lettuce, Endive, Leek, Turnips, 
Kohlrabi, Broccoli, Early Cauliflower, 
Kale, Celery, Corn Salad and Mustard. 

After the 15th of this month, Creole 
Onion seed can be sown. This is an im- 
portant crop, and should not bo neglect- 
ed. If it is very dry, cover the bed, af- 
ter the seed has been sown, with green 
moss ; it will keei") the ground moist. 



and the seed will come up more regu- 
larly. The moss has to be taken off as 
the young plants make their appear- 
ance. 

Celery plants may be set out in ditch- 
es prepared for that purpose. Cauli- 
flower and Cabbage plants can be trans- 
planted if the weather is favorable. 

If the weather is not too hot and dry, 
Spinach should be sown ; but it is use- 
less to do so if the weather is not suit- 
able. 

Cabbage can be sown, but it is much 
better to sow in August and transplant 
during this month. 

Set out Shallots. Sorrel should be 
divided and replanted. 

Sow Turnip-rooted Celery. 



OCTOBER. 

Artichokes should be dressed, the ] is better to get the seed into the ground 

suckers or sprouts taken off and nev/ I as soon as possible, so the plants get to 

plants made. be some size before the cold weather 

Onion seed can still be sown ; but it comes. 



FOR THE SOUTKEllN STaTF.S. 



Towards the end of the month Black 
PJye Marrowfat Peas can be planted ; 
also, English or Windsor Beans. 

Sow Cabbage, Cauliflower, Broccoli, 
Brussels Sprouts, Kale, Spinach, Mus- 
tard, Swiss Chard, Carrots, Beets, Sal- 
sify, Leek, Corn Salad, Parsley, Ro- 
quette, Chervil, Kohlrabi, Radish, Let- 
tuce, Endive and Parsnip. Shallots 
from the first planting can be divided 
and set out again. Salsify does very 
finely here, but is generally sown too 
late ; this is the proi^er month to sow 
the seed. The ground should be mellow 
and have been manured last spring. It 
should be spaded up very deeply, as the 
size and smoothness of the roots depend 
upon the preparation of the soil. 



Water the Celery with soap suds, and 
if the season has been favorable by the 
end of this inonth, some may be earthed 
up. 

Sow Rye, Eaiiey and Red Oats, Or- 
chard Grass, Red and White Clover, and 
Alfalfa Clover. Strawberry plants" 
should be transplanted ; they cannot be 
left in the same spot for three or four 
years, as is done North. The Wilson's 
Albany, and Sucker State, are the fa- 
vorite varieties for the market. 

The Wilson's Albany do not make 
many runners here, but they form a 
stool, something like the plants of 
violets, and these stools have to be taken 
up and divided. 



NOVEMBER 



Continue to sow Spinach, Corn Sala-l, 
Radish, Lettuce, Mustard, Roquette, 
Parsley, Chervil, Carrots, Salsify, Pars- 
nips, Cress and Endive, also Turnips 
and Cabbage, Superior Plat Dutch and 
Improved Drumhead, sown in this 
month, make fine Cabbage in the spring. 
--Artichokes should be dressed, if not 
already done last month. 

Sow Black Eye and other late varieties 
of Peas. Frost does not hurt them as 
long as they are small, and during this 
time of the year they will grow but 
very slowly. English Beans can be 
planted ; frost does not hurt them, and. 



if not planted soon, they will not bear 
much. 

Manure for hot-beds should be looked 
after, and ought not to be over one 
month old. It should be thrown to- 
gether in a heap, and, when heated, 
forked over again, so the long and short 
manure will be well mixed. The first 
vegetables generally sown in the hot- 
beds are Cucumbers; it is best to start 
them in two or three inch pots, and 
when they have tv/o rough leaves, trans- 
plant them to their place; two good 
l-»lants are sufficient under every sash. 



DECEMBER 



Not a great deal is planted during this 
month, as the ground is generally occu- 
pied by the growing crops. 

Plant Peas for a general crop ; some 
Potatoes may be risked, but it is uncer- 
tain whether they will succeed or not. 

Sow Spinach, Roquette, Radish, Car- 
rots, Lettuce, Endive and Cabbage. 

Early varieties of Cauliflower can be 
sown in a frame or sheltered situation, 
to be transplanted in February into the 
open ground. Early Cabbages, such as 



York, Oxheart and Wlnningstadt, may 
be sown. 

To those who wish to force Tomatoes 
I will say that this is the month to sow 
them. The best kind for that purpose 
is the Extra Early Dwarf Red. It is 
really a good acquisition ; it is very 
dwarfish, very productive, and of good 
size, and bears the fruit in clusters, but 
will sell only for the first, as the fruit is 
not so large as the Livingston varieties, 
v/hich come in later. 



KICHAKD FKOTSCHEK'S ALMAjS^AC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



FLOWER SEEDS. 



The following list of Flower seeds is not very large, but it contains all which is 
desirable and which will do Avell in the Southern climate. I import them from one 
of the most celebrated growers in Prussia, and they are of the best quality. There 
lare very few or no flower seeds raised in this country, and Northern houses, which 
publish large lists and catalogues, get them from just the same sources as myself; 
but they, on an average, sell much higher than I do. Some varieties, which are 
bi-ennial in Europe or North, flower here the first season ; in fact, if they do not, they 
generally do not flower at all, as they usually are destroyed by the continued long 
heat of summer. Some kinds grow^ quicker here and come to a greater perfection 
than in a more Northern latitude. 

Flow^er seeds require a little more care in sowing than vegetable seeds. The 
ground should be well pulverized and light enough not to bake after a rain. Some 
of the more delicate and finer varieties are better sovv^n in boxes or seed pans, 
where they can be better handled and protected from hard rains or cold weather ; 
the other kinds do not transplant well, and are better sown at once where they are 
to remain, or a few seeds may be sown in small pots to facilitate transplanting into 
the garden without disturbing the plants, when large enough. Some have very 
fine seeds, which the mere pressing of the hand or spade to the soil will cover ; others 
may be covered one-fourth of an inch, according to their size. Watering should be 
done carefully, and if not done with a syringe, a watering pot, where the holes of 
the spout are very fine, should be used. 

By setting the plants out, or sowing the seeds in the border, consideration 
should be taken of the height, so that the taller varieties may be in the middle and 
the dwarf kinds on the edge of the bed. 

The seeds are put up at ten cents a package, fifteen packages for one dollar, 
except a few rare or costly kinds, where the price is noted. All flower seeds in 
packages are mailed free of postage to the purchaser. Where there is more than 
one color, I generally import them mixed, as I find that most of my customers do 
not wish to purchase six packages, or more, of one variety, in order to get all the 
colors. One package of Asters, Zinnia, Phlox, Chinese Pink, German Stocks, 
Petunia, Portulaca, and others, will always contaiu an equal mixture of the best 
colors. 



ABtliea Rosea. Hollyhock. This 
flower has been much improved of late 
years, and is very easily cultivated . Can 



of all shades, from white to dark purple 

and crimson. One and a half feet high. 

Aster. Trufaut's Pffiony-Flowered 



be sown from October till April. Yery Perfection. Large double pasony-shaped 

hardy ; from four to six feet high. ! flowers, of fine mixed colors ; one of the 

AlyssBtiii soai'itiiiiusn. Sweet j best varieties. Two feet high ; sow from 

Alyssum. Very free flowering plants, December till March. Asters should be 

about six inches high, with white sown in a box or in pots, and kept in a 

flowers ; very fragrant. Sow from Octo- green-house, or near a window ; when 

ber till April. | large enough,transplantinto the border. 

AntsriiiniiRn majiis. Snapdragon. | Take a shovel of compost and mix with 

Choice mixed. Showy plant of various the ground before planting. Put three 



colors. About two feet high. Should be 
sown early, if perfect flowers are desired. 
Sow from October till March. 

Aster. Queen Margaret. German 
Quilled. Perfect double quilled flower. 



to four plants together and they will 
show better. They can be cultivated in 
pots. 

Adonis aiituiniialis. Flos Adonis 
or Pheasant's Eye. Showy crimson 



ror. THE fiOUTHEtlN STATES. 



07 





maraBtliue Saliclfolius, Fountain Plant. 



Tru.faut's Pseony-Flowered Aster. 




Amarautliu^ Caudatus. 



DojlWe Daisy. 



Adonis autumnnlis. 



I 



as 



SLCHABD FEOTSCHrE S ALH^XAC A^TD GABBEN MANUAL 



flower, of loDg duration. One foot high. 
Sow from November till April. 

Amarantlius oaudatus. Love 
Lies Bleeding. Long red racemes with 
blood red flow<ers. Yery graceful ; three 
feet high. 

Aiuaranthus tricolor. Three- 
colored Amaranth. Tery showy; cul- 
tivated on account of its leaves, which 
are green, yellow and red. Two to three 
feet high. • : 

Amarauthus bicolor. Two-colored 
Amaranth. Crimson and green varie- 
gated foliage; goo 1 for edging. Two 
feet high. 

Auiarauthus §alicifoliiis. Foun- 
tain Plaiit. Eic'h colored foliage, very 
graceful. Five to six feet high. Sow 
from February till June. 

Aq^iileffia, Columbine. A showy 
and beautif ai flower of different colors ; 
two feet high. Sow from October till 
IMareh. Should be sown early if flowers 
are wfgbed ; if sown late will not bloom 
till next season 

BalsauiiuaHorteu^is. Lady Slip- 
per. A well known flower of easy cul- 
ture. Requires good gPDund to produce 
double flowers. 

Balsamiaa. Improved Camelia- 
flowered. Very double and beautiful 
colQrs, The strain which I offer of this 
variety is very fine; hut to have them 
perfect, they should not be sown tog 
soon. In rich ground and during dry 
weather they recj^uire plenty of water. 

BalsamJua caioeilia flora alba. 
Pure white flowers, used for bounuets ; 
about two feet high. Sow from Febru- 
ary till August. 

Bellis Perennis. Daisy. Finest 
double mixed variety; four inches high. 
From October till -January. 

CacalJa coccinea. Scarlet Tassel 
Flower. A profuse flowering plant, with 
tass3l-shaped flowers in cluster: one 
and a half feet. Sow February till May. 

Calendula officinalis. Pot Mari- 
gold. A plajit which, properly speaking, 
belongs to the aromatic herbs, but 
sometimes cultivated for the flowers, 
which vary in different shades of yellow : 
one and a half feet high. From January 
till April. 



Celosia cri§tata. Dwarf Cock's- 
comb. Well known class of flowers 
which are very ornamental, producing 
large heads of crimson and yellow 
flowers ; one to two feet high. Sow from 
February till August. 

CheirantSiiis Clieiri. Wall Flower. 
This flower is highly esteemed in some 
parts of Europe, but does not grow very 
perfectly here, and seldom produces the 
large spikes of double flowers which 
are very fragrant. Two feet high. No- 
vember till March. 

Campanula Speculum. Bell- 
Flower, or Yenus' Looking-Glass. Free 
flowering plants of different colors, from 
white to dark blue ; one foot high. Sow 
December till March. 

Centaurea c}^auR§. Bottle Pink. 
A hardy annual of ea,^v culture, of 
various colors ; two fe^t higli, 

Centaurea suavolens. Yellow. 
Sweet Sultan. December to April. 

Cineraria hybrida. A beautiful 
green-house plant. Seed should b^ sown 
in October or November, and they will 
flower in spring. Per package, 25 cents. 

Cineraria I^aritima. A hand- 
some border plant, which is cultivated 
on account of its silvery white leaves. 
Stands our summer well. 

Coletii^. A well known and beautiful 
bedding ]-)lant, which can be easily prop- 
agated by seeds which produce differ- 
ent shades of colored plants. 

Dianthus Barbatu§. Sweet Wil- 
liam. A well known plant which has 
been much improved of late years. 
Their beautiful colors make them very 
showy. Should be sown early, otherwise 
they will not flower the first spring ; one 
and a half feet high. October till April. 
Diautlius Chinensis. Chinese 
Pink. A beautiful class of annuals of 
various colors, which flower very pro- 
fusely in early spring and summer ; one 
foot high. From October till April. 

Diauthus Heddewiggii. japan 
Pink. This is the most showy of any of 
the annual pinks. The flowers are very 
large and of brilliant colors; one foot 
hish. Sow from October till April. 

Diantliu§ plumaris. Border Pink. 
A Iragrant pink used for edging. The 



FOE THE SOUTHERN STATES. 




Celosia Cristata. 



Ba-lsamiua Camellia- Flowered. 



100 



HICKAED FHOTSCHEK'^S ALMANAC AI7D GARDEN MA2TUAL. 



flowers are tinged, generally pink or 
white, with a dark eye. Does not flower 
the first year ; two feet high. Sow from 
January till xlpril. 

S>iafiitiiu§ caayophyilus. Oarna- 
tlon Pink. This is a well known and 
highly esteemed class of flowers. They 
are double, of different colors, and ver^^ 
fragrant ; can be sown either in fall or 
spring; should be shaded during mid- 
summer and protected from hard rains ; 
three to four feet high. November till 
April. 

I>iaBit.liiis Pieotee, Finest hybrids. 
Stage flo-v^ers saved from a collection 
of' ever 500 named varieties; per 
package, 50e. 

Dlaiifiitas piiiiiila. E^riy dwarf 
flowering Carnation. If sown early, this 
variety will flower th# first season. 
They are ciuite dwarfish and flower very 
profusjely. iNovember till April. 

©eipliiiiatiiis Isaperialis, fl. pi. 
Imperial flowering Larkspur. Yery 
handsome variety of symmetrical form. 
Mixed colors ; bright red. dark blue and 
red stripes ; Ih feet high. 

Oelptiiulum ajacis. Eocket Lark- 
spur. Mixed colors : very showy ; two 
and a half feet. 

Belptiiiimai CIsiiieiisis. Dwarf 
China Larkspur. Mixed cQlors ; very 
pretty; one foot high, November till 
April. 

Note —None of the above three varie- 
tios transplant well, and are better sown 
at once where they are intended to re- 
main. 

Dalilia* Large flowering Dahlia. 
Seed soY/n in the spring will flower by 
June. Yery pretty colors are obtained 
from seed; the semi-double or single 
ones can be pulled up as they bloom ; 
but those seeds which are saved from 
fine double varieties will produce a good 
percentage of double flowers. Febru- 
ary till June. 

£schS€koltzla CaJiforoiica. Cal- 
ifornia Poppy. A very free flowering 
plant, good for masses. Does not trans- 
plant well. One foot high, December 
till April 

Oaillardia bicolor,. Two-colored 
Gaillardia.. Yery showy plants, which 



continue to flower for ar long time. 
Flowers red, bordered with orange yel- 
low. One and a half feet high. Janu- 
ary till April. 

OiiSla. Mixed Gillia. Dwarf plants 
which flower freely, of various colors. 
One foot. December till April. 

Oomphrena aBba and purpurea. 
White and Crimson Batchelor Button 
or Globe Amaranth. Well known va- 
riety of flowers; very early and free 
flowering; continue to flower for a long 
time. Two feet high. From February 
till August. 

OeraGilum ZonaBe. Zonale Ger- 
anium. Seed saved from large flower- 
ing varieties of different colors; should 
be sown in seed i)an8, and when large 
enough transplanted into pots, where 
they can be left, or transplanted in 
spring into the open ground. 

Oeraulum peBarg^oisiuni. Large 
flowering Pelargonium. Spotted varie- 
ties, 25 cents per package. 

Oeraniuni odoratlssima. Apple- 
scented Geranium. Cultivated on ac- 
count of its fragrant leaves; .25 cents 
per package. Both of these kinds are 
not plants, and require shade during 
hot weather. Should be sown during 
fall and winter. 

OypsopliiBa paulculata. Gypso- 
phlla. A graceful plant with white 
flowers, which can be used for bouguets. 
Que foot high." From December to 
April. 

lIeiloti'upiu3ii. Mixed varieties 
with dark and light shaded flower. A 
well known plant, esteemed for the 
fragrance of its flowers, which are pro- 
duced during the whole summerin great 
profusion. This plant is generally prop- 
agated by cuttings, but can also be 
raised from seed. Should be sown in a 
hot-bed if sown early, 

Heliciirysum inoti§trosu«i al- 
buns. Y'hite Everlasting Flower. 
Yery showy double flowers. One and a 
half feet high. 

HeBiclirysuni snou§tt osum rub- 
rum. Pvcd Everlasting Flower. Yery 
ornam.ental. One and a half feet high. 
D.ecember till April- Does not trans- 
plant well. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



loi 




.Cacftlia Coccinoa. 



Delphiniam eblnensis. l.'iraitlius Caryopiiyllu*. 





Parpli GloLe .Vmaranlh. 




DiafEttltus Pieotee. 



Diautkus Heddewlag-ii. 



liVj 



F.rCHAxtD FROTSCHES'S ALMA>*AC AXD GaEDEN MANUAL 



Kelia£itliii$ fl. pi. Double Flower- 
ing Sunflower. A well known plant, 
with showy yellow flowers. The double 
is often cultivated in the flower garden. 
The single varieties are cultivat-ed most- 
ly for the seed. They are said to be 
anti-malarious. Four feet high. Feb- 
ruary till ]\Iay. 

Iberia aiiiara. White Candytuft. 
A well known plant raised a good deal 
by florists for bouQ.uets. Can be sown 
at different times to have a succession of 
flowers. One foot high. 

Iberis uinbelata rosea. Purple 
Candytuft. One foot. October till April. 

L.iiiiii]i §rraEidifloruui rubruui. 
Scarlet Flax. A very pretty plant for 
masses or borders, with bright scarlet 
flowers, dark in the centre. One foot. 
January till April. 

L,obeila eri&iu§. Lobelia. A very 
graceful planr with white and blue 
flowers, well adapted for hanging bas- 
kets or border. Half foot. October rill 
March. 

JLychiits cliaicedoutca. Lychnis. 
Fine plants with scarlet, white and rose 
flowers. Two feet. December till April. 

Lupiiius. Lupinus. Plants with 
spikes of flowers of various colors. 
Should be sown'" soon. Does not trans- 
plant well. Two feet. October till 
March. 

ITIatliioIa anuua. Ten weeks stocks. 
This is one of the finest annuals in cul- 
tivation. Large flowers of all colors, 
from white to dark blue or crimson. 
Should be sown in pots or pans, and 
when large enough transplanted into 
rich soil. One and a quarter feet. Octo- 
ber till March. 

^eseinbryautlieumiii crystalli- 
nuin. Ice plant. Xeat plant with icy 
looking foliage. It is of spreading habit. 
Good for baskets or beds. One foot. 
February till March. 

ZVUmulustig-riuiis. Monkey flower. 
Showy flowers of yellow and brown. 
Should be sown in a shady place. Does 
not transplant well. Half f o< >t. Decem- 
ber till March. 

^latricaria capeu§i§. Double 
Matricaria. White double flowers, re- 
sembling the Daisv, but smaller; are 



fine for bouquets : blooms very nearly 
the whole summer. Two feet. Decem- 
ber till March. 

:TI]Bno§a pudica. Sensitive Plant, 
A curious and interesting plant which 
folds up its leaves when touched. One 
foot. February till June. 

-llirabilis jalapa. Marvel of Peru. 
A well known plant of easy culture; 
producing flowers of various colors. It 
forms a root which can b* preserved 
from one year to another. February till 
June. Three feet. 

.■?Iyosotis palu§tri§. Forget-me- 
not. A fine little plant with small, blue, 
star-like flowers. Should have a moist, 
shady situation. Does not succeed so 
well here as in Europe, of which it is a 
native. Half foot high. December till 
March. 

IVeiiiopUila Iiisiguis. Blue Grove 
Love. Plants of easy culture, very 
pretty and profuse bloomers. Bright 
blue with white centre. One foot high. 

Xemophila luaculata. Large 
white flowers spotted with violet. One 
foot high, December till April. 

IVigella daiiiasceua. Love in a 
Mist. Plants of easy culture, with light 
blue flowers. Daes not transplant well. 
One foot high. December till April. 

1%'iereiiiberi^ia gracili§. Nierem- 
bergia. Xice plants with delicate foli- 
age, and white flowers tinted with lilac. 
One foot high. Xovember till April. 

<£iiotliera Laiuarckiaua. Eve- 
ning Primrose. Showy, large yellow 
flowers. December till April. Two feet 
high. 

Papaver Souiuifeiuiu. Double 
flowering Poppy. Of different colors ; 
very showy. 

Papaver ranniiciilus flowered. 
Double fringed flowers ; verj' showy. 
Cannot be transplanted. Two feet high. 
October till March. 

Pefaiiia liybrida. Petunia. Splen- 
did mixed hybrid varieties. Avery dec- 
orative plant of various colors, well 
known to almost every lover of flowers. 
Plants are of spreading habit, about one 
foot high. January till May. 

Petiiiiia flora pleuo. Large double 
flowering varieties. They are hybri- 



FOR THE SOUTHEKN STATES. 



103 



di:ied with the finest strains, und will 
give from 20 to 25 per cent. of. double 
flowers. Very handsome ; 25 cents per 
package. January till March. 



PSbIo^ DB'iiBniuoiidli. Driim- 
mond's Phlox. One of the best and most 
popular annuals in cultivation. Their 
various colors and length of flowering, 




Early Dwairf Double earsfttibB ?isk. 



GraiUarelia Bicelor. 



Leijeiia ErinnH. 





Matlxioia Aanua. 



Geranium Zwiiile. 



104 



RICHARD FEOTSCHEK^S ALMAXA-C AND GARDEN MANUAL 




Blue Grove Love. 




Petunia Hybrida. 




Nig^ella Damase'e'iia. 



with easy culture, make them favorites 
with every one. AH fine colors mixed. 
One foot higii. December till April.' 

Fh!ox Ornnsitsoiidii gratidi- 
flora. This is an improvement .pn the. 
above ; fiowers are larger, with white 
centre, different colors mixed. Very 
beautiful. One foot high. December 
till April. 

Phlox DrussKBfiiotsdi^ ^raKcIa" 
flora alSia. Pure V7hite, somevvith 
l)urple or violet eye. ■. 

Phlox DrusiBsiiofifid^i |^rai£|!i:» 
flora, stel!£-5ta spleisideas. .(Nesv.) 
This is admitted to be the richest col- 
ored and most effective of all large- 
flowered Phloxes. Tt combines aJl the 
good qualities of the Splendens, with 
the addition of a clearly defined, pure 
white star, which contrasts strikingly 
with the vivid crimson of the -flowers. 

P^rtwSaca. Asmall plant of great 
beauty, and of the easiest culture. 
Does best in a well exposed situation, 
where it has plenty of sun. The flow- 
ers are of %^rious colors, from white to 
bright scarlet and crimson. The plant 
is good for edging vases or pots ; or 
where large plants are kept in tubs, the 
surface can be filled with this neat 
little genus of plants. Half foot high. 
February till August. 

Portulaca g^raiBdiOora fl. pi. 
Double Portulaca. The same variety 
of colors with semi-double and double 
.flowers. Half foot high. February till 
August. 

Prisnulm veris<. Polyanthus. An 
herbaceous plant of various colors, 
highly esteemed- in Europe. Half foot 
high. December till April. 

Priinijilacliinea^as. Chinese Prim- 
rose. A green-house plant, which flow- 
ers profusely and continues to bloom 
ior a long time; should be sown early 
to insure the plant flowering vreil. Dif- 
ferent colors; mixed, p.er package, 25 
cents. One aad a half feet high. Oc- 
tober till February. 

PyretSgrufiii anrca. Golden Feath- 
er. The flowers resemble Asters/ It 
has bright yellow leaves which make 
it very showy as a border if massed 
with plants, such as Ooleus, etc. 



rOK THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



10- 




Lt (•■"li il-i s L' h ; 1 1 ' ' e'd o ]i i g a . 





Gerimiiim Pelargonium. 



Ice Plant. 





Double Matriearia. 



KeHctnvsuOL Monstrosum Alfeum. 



106 



RICHARD FROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




CEnothera L-imarekiaii:^. 




Papaver Ranunculus Flowered. 




Portulaca. 



Reseda, crdoratat Sweet Migno- 
nette. A fragrant plant and a favorite 
with everybody. One foot high. 

Reseda g^raiidiflora. Similar to 
the above plant and flower, spikes larg- 
er. Fifteen inches. December till April. 

Scabiosa naiia^ Dwarf Mourning 
Bride. Plants of double flowers of va- 
rious colors. , One foot high. Decem- 
ber till April. 

f^aponaria calabriea» Soapwort. 
A very free flowering annual, of easy 
culture, resembling somewhat in leaves 
the Sweet William. One and a half feet 
high. December till.April. 

Salvia eoccinea spleiideus. 
Scarlet Salvia or Red Flowering Sage. 
A pot or green-house plant, but which 
can be grown as an annual, as it flowers 
freely from seed the first year. Two to 
three feet high. February till April. 

Silene Aritierta. Lobel's Catchfly. 
A free blooming plant of easy culture ; 
flowers almost anywhere. Bed and 
white. One and a half feet high. 

Tagretes erecta. African er Tall- 
growing Ma,rigold. Very showy annuals 
for borders, with bright yellow flowera 
growing upright. One and a half feet 
high. 

Tagetes patala. French or Dwarf 
Marigold. A very com])act dwarf grow- 
ing variety, covered with yellow and 
brown flowers. One and a half feet 
high. January till April. 

Toreuia Fouriiieri. A plant from 
Mexico of recent introduction, but which 
has become very popular in a short 
time. It stands the heat well, is well 
adapted to pot culture, and makes one 
of the most valuable bedding plants we 
have. The flowers are of a sky blue 
color, with three si^ots of dark blue. 
The seeds are very fine and take a good 
while to germinate. It transplants very 
easily. 

Verbena hybrid a. Hybridized Ver- 
bena. A well known and favorite flower 
for borders. Their long flowering and 
great diversity of color make them 
valuable for every garden, however 
small. All colors mixed. One and a 
half feet high January till April. 



FOR THE SaUTHLnilS[ STATES. 



107 




Phlox Drttm^ondii Crrandiflora. 





Phlox Dtumradndii G-randiflora Stellata Spleudeus. [New] 



Scabioaa, nana. 



108 



EICHA5D FROTSCHEE'S ALMAXAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 




PrlmuU Ver 



Hybrida. Double. 



Ta'aretc-s Erecta. 




Tagetes Patula. 



Viuca Rosea and Alba. 



Reseda udorata. 



Verbena SiHped Italian. These i 
are beautiftil striped kinds of all colors j 
with large eyes. ! 

Verbena Niveii3. White Verbena. I 
Pure white Verbena vf more or less fra- i 
grance. One and a half feet high. Jan- ! 
nary till April. i 

Vinca s'osea and! ^ilba. Eed and 
White Periwinkle. Plants of shining- 
foliage, with white and dark rose colored 
flowers, which are produced the whole 
summer and autumn. Two feet high. 
February till April. 

Vioi^a 04iorala. Sweet Violet. Well 
known edging plant, which generally is 
propagated by dividing the plants ; but 
can also be raised from seed. Halt" loot 
high. SovTJi from January till March. 



Viola tricolor niaxinia. Large 
flowering choicest Pansy. This is one 
of the finest little plants in euitivation 
for r-ois or the open ground. The^" p^re 
of tsndless colors and markings. When 
planted in the garden, they will show 
better if planted in masses, and a little 
elevated above the level of the garden. 
Half foot high. October until March. 

Laige Trlsiaardeass Pansy, This 
is the largest variet^^ in cultivation ; the 
flowers are well formed, generally three 
spoited ; viuite distinct; the plants grow 
compact. 

Zinnia eBega-gis 11. pi. Double 
Zinnia. Plants of very easy culture, 
flowering very profusely through the 
whole summer and fall ; producing 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



109 




Torenia FournlerL 



Choicest Large EDglisli Pansy, 



no 



PJCHAED FEOTSCHEP/S ALMANAC AliD G-AEBEX I^IAN^AL 




Zinnia Elegans. Grauu_.^oja RobusTa Plduisgima 



double flowers of all colors, almost as 
large as the flower of a Dahlia. Thre*^ 
feet hieh. February till August. 

Zinnia eleg^ans psimila tl. pi. 
Dwarf Double 3Iixerl. A cew dwarf 
section, especially desirable. The com- 
pact, bushy I'iants rarely grow over two 
feet high, and are covered with large, 
double Dahlia like flowers of great 
beauty. 

Zinnia clo^aus, g:i'andi3oi a ro- 
busta pienissima. A nev variety 



recently introduced here from G-ermany. 
The plants of this new class of showy 
and attractive annuals are of very robust 
growth and produce very large and 
extremely double flowers ; measuring 
from 4 to 5 inches in diameter. The seeds 
I offer for sale, come direct from the 
originator, and contain about eight 
different beautiful colors, mostly very 
bright. 



FOE THE SOUTHEEN STATES. 



Ill 




Large Trimardeau Pansy. 




AiirtMii' I 



M^xMM. 




Double Poxtulaoa. 



HybrJUlLzcd Verbena, 



112 



EICHARD rROTSCHER S ALIMANAC AKD GAEDEX MANUAL 



CLIMBhNG PLANTS 







* 4' 



BallGOii Vine. 






Mornin'j- Glon 



^srixe'^l Xhunbergia. 



Beoincasacerifera. Wax Gourd. 
A strong growing vine with long shaped 
darii crimson fruit, which looks very 
ornamental. It is used for preserves. 

Cai'diospemuitiii. Balloon Vine. 
A quick-grov.ing climber, the seeds of 
which are in a pod, shaped like a minia- 
ture balloon, therefore the name. 

CobsBa Scaaidens. Climbing Co- 
b£ea. Large i:>urple bell-shaped flowers. 
Should be sown in a hot-bed, and not 
kept too moist. Place the seed edgewise 
in the ground. Twenty feet high. Jan- 
uary till April. 

ConvolVMliis major. Morning 
Glory. Well known vine with various 
handsomely oolored flowers, of easy 



culture. Grows almost anywhere. Ten 
feet high. February till July. 

C]Hr€Hrbita. Ornamental Gourd. 
Mixed varieties or Ornamental Gourds 
of dilTerent shapes and sizes. February 
till May. 

Curcurblta la§r€naria dulcls. 
Sweet Gourd. A strong growing vine 
of which the young fruits are used like 
Squash. February till April. 

DoiiclBosLablab. Hyacinth Beans. 
Free growing plant, with purple and 
white flowers. March till April. 

Iponiaea Qiiamoclit rosea. Bed 
I Cypress Vine. Very beautiful, delicate 
: foliage, of rapid growth, with scarlet 
1 flowers. . ;- . 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



113 



jij\4 





Hvaflnth Bean. 



;\IauraurTi;i r5ar<l!0 



Iponiseii ^iiaiii«>€lat Eilba. White 
Cyi,)ress Vine. Th(» yame as the red 
variety. 

Ipomsea Bona Nox, Large Flow- 
ering Evening Glory. A vine of ra.pi<l 
growth, with beautiful blue an<l white 
liowers which open in the evening. 
Twenty feet higli. February till Jane. 

This is the Moon flower advertised in 
Northern catalogues as a novelty, not- 
withstanding the fact that^it has been 
Ivnown here for the past century. 

IjatlByrns 04loratiis.. Sweet Peas. 
Tieautiful flowers of all colors, very 
showy. Good for cut flowers. Six feet 
high. December till April. 

llIasBraasdia Barclayaiia. Mixed 
Maurandia. A slender growing vine of 
rapid growth. Rose purple and white 
colors naixed. Ten feet high. February 
till April. 

inina Lotoata. This novelty, which 
is supposed to have first originated in 
Mexico, is one of the most beautiful 
climbing vines for ornamenting the 
garden. It closely resembles in growth 
and its three-lobed foliage the several 
species of the family of Ipomeea; but 
the flowers are altogether different. 
The flowers appear on fork-like racemes 
bearing themselves upright or almost 
erect out of the dense and luxuriant 
foliage, and with their bright colors 
they present an extraordinary striking 
aspect. The buds are at first bright red. 



but change to orange yellow, and when 
in full bloom, to yellowish white. The 
most singular feature of this plant is, 
that it retains the racemes developed at 
first duriug the whole flowering season^ 
the buds conlinuing to grow succes- 
sively at the top of the racemes, while 
the lower flowers, after blooming for 
some time, fade, bearing thus con- 
tinually clusters of flowers from the 
bott(^m UD to the hi<7li^'st vine of the 




Mina Lobata. 



114 



niCHARD FROTSCHEK^ ALMANAC AND GAKDE5? JIANtiAL 



plant. The oldest racemes attain a 
length of 15 to IS mches, and at the end 
of the time of blooming they have pro- 
duced from 30 to 40 individual flowers on 
each raceme, of which G to 10 had been 
in full bloom at a time. This plant is a 
very rapid growing climber ; within 
three months the vine attains a height 
oi: 18 to 20 feet. It does well on sunny 
situations, and canyot be surpassed fox 
covering arbors, trellises, etc., on ac- 
coimt of its rapid growth and great 
dimensions. I have flowered tiiis beauti- 
ful climber, the past season, and can 
substantiate all what is stated above. It 
should be sown early, in order to get it 
to perfection. 

Do not fail to give it a trial. 

Price, per packet, 25c. 

Mamordflca Baliiii&iiiiEisa,. Bal^ 
sam Apple. A climbing plant of very 
rapid growth, producing Cucumber-like 
fruits, with warts on them. "They are 
believed to contain some medicinal vir- 



tues. They are put in jars with alcohol, 
and are used as a dressing for cuts, 
bruises, etc. 

I^ufia actitan^ula. Dish Rag Vine. 
A very rapid growing vine of the Gourd 
family. When the fruit is dry, the fibrous 
substance, which covers the seeds, can 
be used as a rag. February till April. 

Secliiiaaii edule. Vegetable Pear or 
Mirliton. A rapid growing vine with 
grape-like leaves, of which the fruit is 
eaten ; there are two varieties, white and 
green. It has only one seed, and the 
whole fruit has to be planted. 

Tropseoluni niajns. Nasturtium. 
Trailing plants with elegant flowers of 
different shales, mostly yellow and 
crimson, which are produced in great 
abundance. Four feet high. .February 
till April. 

TBiunbergla. Mixed Thuubergia. 
Very ornamental vines, with yellow 
bell-shaped flowers, with dark eye. Six 
feet high. February till May. 



BULBOUS ROOTS. 



Aiieinoiies. Double flowering. 
Planted and treated the same as the 
KanuQculus. They are of great varie* 
ties in color. 

Double Dutch, 40 cts. per dozen. 

Dalilias. Fine double-named varie- 
ties. Plants so well known for their 
brilliancy, diversity of colors and pro- 
fuse flowering qualities, that they re- 
quire no recommendation. They can be 
planted from February till May; they 
thrive best in rich loamy soil. They 
should be tied up to stakes, which ought 
to be driven into the ground before or 
when planting them. To have them 
flower late in the season they should be 
planted late in the spring, and tne 
flower buds nipped off when they ap- 
pe8.r ; treated in this way, they will pro- 
duce perfect flowers during fall. Undi- | 
vided roots, $3.00 per dozen. j 

The roots I offer are of the very best i 
type, having taken special pains to dis- i 
oard varieties which did not flower well | 
here. ". 1 

Gladiolus. Hybrid Gladiolus. One ! 



of the best summer flov»'ering bulbs; 
they have been greatly improved of late 
years, and almost every color has been 
produced ; is tinged and blotched in all 
shades from delicate rose to dark Ver- 
million. When planted at intervals 
during spring, they will flower at differ- 
ent times, but those that are planted 
earliest produce the finest flowers. The 
roots should be taken up in the fall. 

Hybrids mixed, first choice, lOo. ea.oh ; 
75c. per dozen. 

Hybrids, white ground, 1st choice, 10c 
each ; 75g, per dozen. 

Oloxtnias. These are really bul- 
bous green house plants, but they can be 
cultivated in pots and kept in a shady 
place in the garden, or window. They 
are very beautiful ; color from white to 
dark violet and crimson. The leaves are 
velvety, and on some varieties very 
large. They should be planted early in 
spring ; require sandy ground and a good 
deal of moisture during flowering time. 
French Hybrids, strong bulbs, $3.00 per 
dozen. 



FOR THE SOtrfHERN STATES. 



115 





Anemones 



D,aliUa;s, 





Hj'-i^rid GlfKiioli 



GloxiiMftfi. 



lie 



RICHAED FEOTSCHEES ALIMAXAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 









Liliuiaian?i:"cl:u:x Rubriia 



Dpubie Hyaeinth. 



biusle Hroeintli. 



Ilyaciutlis. , Dutch.' Double and 
single. The Hyacinth is a beautiful 
flowering bulb, well suited for open 
ground or pot culture. They should be 
planted from October till February. If 
planted in pots it is well to keep in a 
cool, rather dark place, till they are well 
started, when they can be placed in the 
full light and sun. Double and single, 
10 cents each ; SI. 00 per dozen. 

Xarci§§us. Bulbs of the easiest cul- 
ture, ] slanted from November to .January. 



Double White, isiceet acenied. 
Telioic Mixed. Pobjanthus Narcissus. 
White 
Price, 5c. each; 50c. perdo2en. 
l^ilium tlg^rinuni. Tiger Lily. A 
well known variety, very showy and of 
easy culture ; 10 cents each. 

Lihuui tlgriisiim fl. pi. This is a 
new variety: it is i-erfectly double, and 
the petals are imbricated almost as reg- 
ularly as a camellia flower. Xovel and 
fine. 15 cents each. 



JAPAN LILIES. 



Liliiim auratuin. Golden Band 
Lily. This is a very handsome lily ; the 
flowers are large and white, each petal 
having a yellow stripe. It is of easy 
culture. A loamy, dry soil suits it beat.. 
and plantad one. inch deep. 



The past season I had occasion to see 
several of this noble lily in bloom, and 
it is really fine : half a dozen flowers 
opening at the same time and measur- 
ing from six to nine inches across. It 
is very fragrant. I expect some fine 



rOR THE SOUTHERN h'TATES. 



117 



bulbs, same as I had last year, imixvrted 
direct from their native country. 

Flowering bulbs, 25c. each. 

Liiliaiii laiicifolium afibuin. 
Pure white, Japan Lily, 30 cents each. 

Liliuni lancifoliuui r ii b r u ibi. 
White and red spotted, 15 cents each. 

Liliuiii laiBCifolitiaiB roseuiii. 
Rose spotted, 1")C. each. 

These Japan Lilies are very beautiful 
and fragrant. Should be planted froui 



October till January. Perfectly suited 
to this climate. 

Paeonisi. i^ineiii^is. Chiiuse or her- 
baceous Paeonia, Herbaceous p-lants of 
different colors and great beauty ; they 
should be planted during fall in a shady 
situation, as they flower early in spring. 
If planted too late they will not flower 
perfectly; 25c. each. 

I£iiniiiii€u9iis. Double Flowering. 
The roots can be i>lanted during fall 




Double TuUp. 





single Tulip. 



Tuberoses, double floweriiu 



118 



mCHABD FKOraCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 





Ra'ntiuc'aluB. 



Seflla per'uvisBs. 



and winter, either in the open ground 
or in pots. The French varieties are 
more robust than the Persian, and the 
fldwers are larger. The ground should 
be rather dry, and if planted in the open 
ground, it will be well to have the spot 
a little higher than the bed or border. 

French Ranunculus. . . .25c. per dozen. 

§ciEla pea'uviaaia. These are 
green-house fculbs at the North, but 
here thej^ are hardy, and do well in the 
oi^en ground. There are two varieties 
—the blue and white. The>' throw up 
a shoot, on the end of which the flowers 
appear, forming a truss. Plant from 
October till January. 30 cents each. 

Tulips. Double and single Tulips 
thrive better in a more Northern lati- 



tude than this, but some years they 
flower v:eU here, and as they are cheap, 
a few flowering bulbs will pay the small 
amount they cost. They should not be 
planted later than December, and 
placed very shallow in the ground ; not 
more than one-third of the bulb should 
be covered. When near flowering they 
require a good deal of moisture. Single 
and double, 50 cents per dozen. 

TMtoei'oscs. Double Flowering. 
They are ornamental for the garden, 
and very vahiablo for making bouquets, 
on account of their ]>ure white color 
and great fragrance. Plant <iuring the 
spring months. Strong bulbs, 10 cents 
each ; 75 cents per dozen. 



See what our customers say about Frotscpiers 
Sekds for the South. 



Moss PoiJvT, Miss., July 17, 1888. 

The seeds were splendid, Dahlias and 

Tube Koses are beautiful. The madam 

believes in FroL^cJier'^ seeds every time, 

L. M. Hand. 



CoFiELD P. O., La., June 5, 1888. 

Having dealt with you for the last five 

years, I must say that I have always 



been very well i»leased with your seed, 
and have found you to be very i>rompt 
in filling my orders. 

Mrs. F. M. Behtheaud. 

Devall P, O., La., July 25, 1888. 
T have given your seeds a fair trial, 
and have found them to be invaluable. 
James R. Devall. 



/wvm TffE SOUTHERN STATES. 



iiy 



THE NEW YORK SEED DRILL 



MATTHEWS' PATENT. 




I take pleasur<^ in calling your attention to a perfect Seed Drill. This Drill 
was invented and perfected by the father of the seed-drill business— Mr. E. G. Mat- 
thews, It has been his aim for years to make a perfect drill and do away with the 
objections found in &\\ others, &nd in the New York he has acfromplishe'd it. Its 
advantages over other drills are as follows : 



1. Marker-bar under the frame, held 
by clamps, easy to adjust to any width 
by simply loosening thumb nuts. 

2. Adjustable plow, which opens a 
wide furrow, and can be set to sow at 
any depth. 

3. Open seed conductor to show seed 
dropping. 

4. Bars in seed conductor, for scatter- 
ing seed in wide furrows, prevents dis- 
turbing strong plants when thinning 
out— an important feature. 

5. Eidged roller. 

6. Dial plate in full sight of operator, 
and made of patent combination white 
metal which prevents rust. 



and 
seed 



7. Dial plate set on fulcrum, 
hence holds close up, preventing 
from spilling. 

8. It has a large seed»box with hinged 
cover. 

9. Machine will stand up alone when 
not in use, not liable to tip over. 

It is the SIMPLEST, MOST COM- 
PACT and EASIEST DRILL TO HAN- 
DLE, being only 32 inches long. 

It covers the seed better and runs 
very easy. 

Packed in crates forship])ing. Weigli 
about 45 pounds. Price, $10. no. 



MATTHEWS' HAND CULTIVATOR 



The Matthews' Hand Cultivator is 
one of the best implements in use for 
weeding between row crops, and for Hat 
cultivation generally, and is an indis- 
pensible companion to the seed drill. 

It is thoroughly constructed through- 
out, very durable ; easy to operate. A 
boy can do as mncli ivith it as six men 
with hoes. It spreads from 6 to 14 inches, 




I'riee. ■$■ 



boseili. 



120 



RICHARD FROTSCHEPv's ALMANAC AKD GARDEN MANUAL 



and will cut ail tiie ground covered, even 
wiien spread to its greatest extent. Its 
teetii are of a new and improved pattern 
and thoroughly pulverize and mellow 



the soil. The depth of cultivatiag may 
be accurately gauged by raising or low- 
ering the wheels, which is quickly done 
by the use of a thumb screw. 



THE CHAUTAUQUA CORN AND SEED 

PLANTER. 




PateHtedApril4. 1^85. 



Unequalled in S'bnplicitt/, Dar ability and EffiGiencij, 
The Best is the Cheapest. Perfectly Simple. Simply Perfect. 



DIRECTIONS. 

To set the seed c«_p.— Loosen the set- 
screw and draw out the inside or narrow 
gauge far enough to drop the desired 
number of seeds. Then tighten the 
screw. For ordinary planting, only the 
narrow gauge should be moved. In 
putting in phosphate, or a large quan- 
tity of seed, both the narrow and wide 
gauges should be drawn out together. 
By taking out the screws, the gauges 
may be drawn entirely out. 

In experienced or careful hands the 
machine will plant perfectly in atiy kind 
or condition of soil, mellow or soddy, 
dry or wet. 

To operate the planter. ~-V\q.gq the 
blades in the ground to the desired 
depth, in advance of you, having the 
"step" to the front, as in the cut, with- 
out its touching the ground. Then 
pressing down forward on the handle, 
walk forward. The step will press on 
the ground and then the blades will be 
opened,.the seed deposited in the ground 



and a charge taken for the next hill. 
After walking past the planter, still 
pressing on the handle, lift it from the 
ground to place for the next hill; as 
this is done the charge of seed will be 
HEARD rattling down upon the steel 
blades, and the operator will know the 
seed is ready for the next hill. Use 
the planter as you would a cane, or as 
much so as possible. Tlie blades must 
always enter the ground closed, and come 
out open. 

Its Efficiency. — We claim that the 
"Chautauqua" is not equalled as a drop- 
per and planter. By actual trial in the 
field with a number of good planters, 
it has been shown that our machine vsdll 
cover the seed in different soils and at 
different depths, shallow or deep, better 
than any other planter. Our new im- 
proved seed slide, having double gauges 
foT adjusting the seed cup, enables the 
planter to di^op accurately smaM or large 
seed in the quantity desired. 

Price, $2 25. 



FOK THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



121 



GARDEN IMPLEMENTS 




O. Ci ll)\n<\ iTuning Shear. 



Laclifes' Sc-t, Floral Tot.ls. No. 




Weeding Hoe and Rake Combined. 




Outrli, or Scuffle Hoe 



French Perfection Shear 



=aynor's Pruning Knife, No. 102. 



Saynors Pruning.Kuife, No. Iti4. 



122 



BICHARD FEOTSCHER'S ALMANaC Ais'B 0AKDE5<' >f A2^DaL 




Slide PruMinp? Bherir. 




Spading Fork. D. Ilj^ndle. 




awbc-riy or Trausplaatine For 



Weiss' Hand Pruninix Shear. 



FOB THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



123 



PRICE'LIST OF GARDEN IMPLEMENTS 



DEAKIN'S IMPROVED BRASS GARDEN 

SYRINGES. 

(AMERICAN.) 

if^ Length of Barrel. 12 in. ; di*m.. 1. 




No. A. -Length of barrel, 12 inches; diaipeter, 1 inch, with one stream and spray 
ro&e. Price, $2.25. 




No. 2. -Ladies' Syringe; length of barrel, Ul inches; diameter l^^- inches; with 
one stream and two spray roses. The two roses, when not in use, are 
screwed on the sides of the barrel, as shown in cut. Price, $i 25. 




No. 3.^- Length of barrel, 18 inches; diameter, U inches. Best Plate Valve Syringe, 
large size, with one stream, two spray roses and side pieces on barrel. 
Pride, S6 50. . 




No. 8."-Length of barrel, 18 inches ; diameter, If inches. Best Conical Valve Syr- 
inge, extra large diameter and length of barrel, with cios- handle and 
one spray rose. Price, $8 00. 




No. 11. --(Second Quality.) Length of barrel, 18 inches ; diameler, i: inches. 0[hmi 
Rose Syringe, full size. Two spray roses and one strmm. Slide attac'n- 
ments. Price, $4 25. 



Lewis' Brass 8yrjng-e, sprav only, If by 20 inches. 



75 



The Deakin's Syringes are known to \,e the best manufactured in 
America, and are far superior to the imported. 



124 EicHARU fkotschek's almaxac axd gaudex Manual 



HOES. 

W. A. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. 00— Field SO 80 

No. 0— " 85 

• " No. 1- " 90 

No. 2— " 1 00 

No. 3- " : : 1 10 

W. A. Lyndon's Louisiana, No. 0— Toy 75 

No. 1— •'•' 75 

No. 2— '* 80 

Bcoad, Field No. 000 40 

No. 00 45 

''• No. 50 

" No. 1..., .. 55 

C. A. Maynard's No. 2 o 55 

No. 4 65 

Brings & Witte's Palmetto No. 2 40 

No. 3 45 

Sandusky Tool Go's Planter's No. 2 .- - . . 30 

No. 6 ..: 40 

No. 3/'0, . . . : . ... ... .... 25 

No. 4,... ....... 35 

Two Pronged German Forged Steel ......:.... .-. 60 

Iron City Grub No. 1 SO 

Chamxnon with handle 75 

Enteri'rise Socket vrith handle 40 

Two Pronged Weeding, with handle . - 40c. and 50 

Four " " " " -. . . 50 

Durch or Scuffle, with handle ;....... 0^0 

So]id Sliank Cotton, v.ith handle, No. 00 ."0 

Planter's '" " No. OuO ... 45 

No. 2 60 

Tiffin Patent Adjustable, No. 1 with handle 55 

No. 2 " 65 

No. 4 " .. 75 

German Pattern Garden, No. 7/0 " . 35 

No. 5/0 " 40 

No. 3 u with handle . . 4:0 

No. 1 '• " 4:5 

No. 2 •• '' 50 

No. 4 " •' .. 60 

Grub or Sprouting, No. 7/0 with handle 45 

No. 5 0" " . . 50 

Two Prong Grape with handle 75 

RAKES. 

Enterprise. Cast Steel, 6 teeth, ... SO 30 

Geneva Tool Co's, Cast Steel, 10 teeth, (Braced).. 45 

"12 •• " 50 

'• 14 '• " 60 

"16 " ■• 70 

Challenge Eakes, Malleable Iron i 10 teeth 30 

•• 12 ■• 40 

" 14 " 4:5 

16 " 50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



125 



Wooden Head, (12 Iron teeth) . $0 50 

Wooden Hay Rakes. . , . . .■ ' 250 and .30 

English Wrought-Iron Rakes (10 teeth ) Avithout harullH 50 

(12 " " " 60 

" (14 " " " . 70 

SPADES. 

Ames' Long Handled (extra heavy) 

Ames' " " Bright 

Ames' Bright, D. Handle 

Rowlands' Long Handled, ... 

Johnson's " " Bright 

French Steel. Bright, without handles $1 10 lo 

SHOVELS. 

Rowland's Short Handled, (square) .... . 

Ames' Bright Long Handled, (round point > . . 

Rowland's Long Handled, (round i)oint) 

Rowland's " " (square) ... ... 



SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Handles for French Scythe Blades (with Ring and Wedge) 

No. 0, Plate Heel, American 

No. 00, Patent Loop Fastener 



SICKLES. 



English (welded), No. 2 

No. 3 . 

Scotch (riveted back,) No. 0. 
No.l. 

English •' No. 2 

No. 3, 
No. 4, 



French Sickles 



No. 1. 
No. 2 



Hedge Shears, 8 inches. 

10 "..... 

Pruning Shears No. 1, Wiss. A . . 

No. 2, " . . . 

" No. 3, •' ... 

" " ■ " • No. 4, ■ " ... 

Pruning Shears No, 2, Wiss. B 

" ' " No. 3, " . 



SHEARS, 



Steel Springs, '.f in. 
10 " . 



No. 109, 

No. 110, 

No. Ill, " " " 11 " .... 

No. 100, Lee's Cast Steel, 9 " 

No. 100, " " " 10 " .. .. 

American Sheeptoe 

O. G. No. 2, Saynor, Cooke & Ridal 

No. 655, " " " 7 in, 

No. 655, " " " 8 '' 



1 10 


90 


90 


75 


70 


1 15 


75 


90 


75 


75 


9(^ 


65 


75 


40 


45 


50 


(^0 


50 


60 


75 


40 


45 


1 75 


2 00 


1 75 


1 05 


1 50 


1 40 


1 65 


1 50 


2 00 


2 25 


2 50 


1 25 


1 50 


75 


1 50 


1 65 


I ao 



126 KICHAPwD FEOT^CHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



Pruning Shears, French Perfection No. 1 S2 75 

No. 2 2 50 

No. 3 2 25 

" " Extra Heavy French, (Pat. Brass Spring.) 3 00 

Slide Pruning Shear, No. 1 2 50 

No. 2 3 00 

No. 3 :..... 3 50 

No. 4 .... , 4 00 

KNIVES. 

H. & J. W. King's Pruning from 60c to 1 25 

Saynor & Cook's from 75c to 1 60 

Saynor & Cook's Budding $1 no and 1 ?5 

Aaron Burkinshaw's Pruning and Budding .. fromiiicto 80 

Geo. Wostenholme's Pruning I, X. L 75 

FORKS. 

Geneva Spading, Long Handled 75 

(strapped) '. ... 80 

Spading Short Handled (strapped i 75c, l.OU and 1 25 

Manure Improved Ferrule Long Handled, G tine (strapped) 1 30 

" Enterprise Long Handled, 4 tine i^trappeii) 70 

Premium " " 4 tine " ;. 70. 

" Geneva " ' " 4 tine " 70 

5 tine " ,. 90 

POTATO HOOKS. 

Long Handled, 6 tine .60c and 065 

" ' - " 4 tine (flat) 40c and 50 

" " 4 tine (round) 50 

" " 4 tine, Extra Heavy 70 

SCYTHES. 

French, First Quality (polished}, 22 inches 75 

24 " 85 

26 " ... 1 00 

28 " .................... 1 10 

Second Quality iblue; 22 " 65 

24 " 75 

20 " . 85 

28 " . 100 

Americ-an Grass ■ 75 

Blood's Champion Grass . . 75 

" " Bramble, 20 to 26 inches . . . 75 

The French Scythe Blades are imported by me, and are of the beflt 
quality : none better can be had. 

FLORAL TOOLS. 

The Boy's Favorite—Hoe. Spade and Rake 2 00 

No, 5. — 4 pieces, Hoe, Piake, Spade and Fork (Ladies' Set) ?..'... . . 1 00 

PRUNING SAWS. 

Diston's 12 inch No. 7 , o 90 

'' Compass 12 inch 50 

Crescent 12 " O 75 

Duplex 16 " .:■.-... ... 100 

Avery's Duplex 18 " ... 1 00 

Brown's 18 inch. — o 75 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 127 



WOODASON'S BELLOWS. 

Double Cono (for insect ]iowder) $-1 UO 

Single " " " 100 

Atomizer I, for liquid and powder) 2 00 

Pure Pyrethrura Powder for above bellows per box 50 

IVBISCELLANEOUS. 

Excelsior Weeding Hooks. o 25 

American Transi)lanting Trowels 10c to 20 

English " " 7 inch 50 

Diston's Transplanting Trowels, (solid shank) 6 inch 15 

Enterprise " " " 20 

Transplanting Forks, (Steel) 35 

(Malleable Iron) 20c and 25 

English Bill or Briar Hooks 125 

Lang's Hand Weeder . . . . 25 

Patent Adjustable Tool Handle, with 4 pieces : 75 

Toy Spades ■ 40 

Toy Shovels 50 

Butch or Scuffle Hoes 45c and 50 

Western Files, 12 inch (flat) . . . . 35 

Fork Handles ... . 20 

Hoe Handles 15c and 20 

Kake Handles . . 15 

Spade and Shovel Handles 25 

Trowbridge's Grafting Wax per lb. 40c ; per ^ lb. 15 

Scotch Wheti^tones 20 

American Indian Pond Whetstone 10 

Darby Creek Whetstone ....".,.... 10 

French Whetstone 15 

Hammer and Anvil for beating French Scythes — 1 50 

Raffia, (for tying) per lb., 40 

WATERING POTS. 

6 Quarts, Japanned 40 

8 " " 50 

10 " " ■ 65 

12 " " 75 

16 *' . " 90 

Extra Heavy (hand made) No. 1, 20 Quarts '.....■■■ 2 00 

" " No. 2, 16 '* .•:-... .... 1 75 

■*' No. 3, 14 " ........ ...... 1 50 

'. .«< '« " '« No. 4, 10 '^ , .....; 125 

\'^ ■ . *' *• No. 5, 8 '* :..... : '.'■'.'... ..:.' 1 00 

The latter are made of the best material, and have very fine rose heads ; they 
are made by a mechanic who has been furnishing the vegetable gardeners for years 
with these pots, and has improved upon them until they are perfect for the purpose. 



128 



EICHARU FROTSCPIEU'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANFAl 



Haviug received many enquiries on the culture of Alfalfa, I reprint the fol- 
lowing letter, ¥;ritten by E. M. Hudson. Esq.. a close observer o!i the subject, to 
give information thereon : 

Villa Eriedheim, 
Mobile County, Ala., SpiiUvuber 7th, 1S78 



Mr. E. Frotschee, New Orleans, La. 

Dear Sir; — Your letter of the 3d inst. 
has just reached me, and I cheerfully 
comply with your request to give you 
the results of mv experiments with 
Lucerne or Alfalfa, and my opinion of it 
as a forage plant for the South. 

I preface my statement with the ob- 
servation that my experiments have 
been conducted on a naturally poor, 
piaey woods soil (which would be class- 
ed as a sandy suil , varying in depth 
from six inches to one foot. But I have 
good red clay sub-soil, which enables 
the soil to retain the fertilizers api)lied 
to it, thus rendering it susceptible of 
permanent enriching. 

Three years since, when my attention 
was first directed to Alfalfa, I sought 
the advice of the editor of the Journal 
of P'rogresi<, Professor Stelle, who in- 
formed me that, after attempting for 
several years to cuitivate it, he had de- 
sisted. He stated that the plant, at 
Citronelle, in this county, died out every 
summer, not being able to withstand the 
hot suns of our climate. Discouraged 
but not dismayed, I determined to test 
the matter on a small scale at first. 
Having procured some seeds in March, 
1876, I planted them on a border in my 
garden, and gave neither manure nor 
work that season. The early summer 
here that year was very dry ; there was 
no rain whatever from the Jirst of June 
to the 23d of July, and from the 2d of 
August to the 15th of November not a 
drop of rain fell on ray place. Yet, 
during all this time, my Alfalfa re- 
mained fresh, bloomed, and was cut two 
or three tim.es. On the 1st of Novem- 
ber I dug some of it to examine the 
habit of root -growth, and to my aston- 
ishment found it necessary to go 22 
inches below the surface to reach any- 
thing like the end of the top roots. At 
once it was apparent that the plant was, 
by its very habit of growth, adapted to 



hot and dry climates. It is indeed a 
"child of the sun.'' 

Encr-uraged by this experiment, in 
which I purposely refra[ne^l from giving 
the Alfalfa any care beyon 1 (Matting it 
occasionally, last year I pro-eeded on 
a larger scale, planting both S!»ringand 
fail, as I have done again this year, to 
ascertain the best season for [)utting in 
the seed. My experience teaches that 
there is no preference to be given to 
spfing sowings over th.ose of autumn, 
provided only, there be enough moist- 
ure in the soil to make the seed germ- 
inate, which they do more quickly and 
more surely than the best turnips. Two 
winters have proved to me that the 
Alfalfa remains green throughout the 
winter in this latitude, 25 miles North 
of Mobile, and at an altitude of 400 feet 
above tide-water. Therefore I should 
prefer fall sowing which will give the 
first cutting from the first of March to 
the 1st of April following. This season 
my first cutting was made on the Istof 
April ; and I have cut it since regialarly 
every four or six weeks, according to the 
weather, to cure for hay. Meanwhile 
a portion has been cut almost daily for 
feeding green, or soiling. Used in the 
latter way 'for under no circumstances 
must it ever be pastured), I am able to 
give my stock fresh, green food, fully 
four weeks before the native wild grasses 
commence to put out. I deem it best 
to cut the day before, what is fed green, 
in order to let it become thoroughly 
wilted before using. After a large 
number of experiments with horses, 
mules, cattle and swine, I can aver that 
in no instance, from March to Novem- 
ber, have I found a case when any of 
these, animals would not give the 
preference to Alfalfa over- every kind 
of grass (also soiled) known in this 
region. And, while Alfalfa makes a 
sweet and nutritious hay eagerly eaten 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



129 



by all kinds of stock, it is as a forage 
plant for soiling, which is available for 
at least nine months in tlie year, that I 
esteem it so highly. The hay is easily 
cured, if that which is cut in the fore- 
noon is thrown into small cocks at 
noon, then spread out after the dew is 
off next morning, sunned for an hour, 
and at once hauled^into the barn. By 
this method the leaves do not fall off, 
which is sure to be the case, if the Al- 
falfa is exposed to a day or two of hut 
sunshine. 

It has been my habit to precede the 
Alfalfa with a clean crop -usually Ruta- 
bagas, after which I sow clay peas, to 
be turned in about the last of July. 
About the middle of September or later 
I have the land plowed, the turn-plow 
being followed by a deep sub-soil-plow 
or scooter. After this the land is fer- 
tilized and harrowed until it is thor- 
oughly pulverized and all lumps broken 
up. The fertilizers employed by me are 
500 lbs. fine bone-dust (phosphate of 
lime) and 1000 lbs. cotton seed hull 
ashes per acre. These ashes are very 
rich in potash and phosphates, con- 
taining nearly 45 per cent of the phos- 
phate of lime — the two articles best 
adapted to the wants of this plant. I 
sow all my Alfalfa with the Matthews' 
Seed Drill, in rows 10 inches apart. 
Broad-cast would be preferable, if the 
land was perfectly free from grass and 
weeds ; but it takes several years of 
clean culture to put the land in this 
condition, sowing in drill is practically 
the best. No seed sower known to me 
can be compared with the Matthews' 
Seed Drill. Its work is evenly and 
regularly done, and with a rapidity that 
is astonishing; for it opens the drill to 
any desired depth, drops the seed, covers 
and rolls them, and marks the line for 
the next drill at one operation, It is 
simple and durable in its structure, and 
is the greatest labor-saving machine of 
its kind ever devised for hand-work. 

When my Alfalfa is about three in- 
ches high, I work it with the Matthews' 
Hand Cultivator. First, the front tooth 
of the cultivator is taken out, by v^hich 
means the row is straddled and all the 



grass cut out close to the plant ; then the 
front tooth being replaced, the cultiva- 
tor is passed between the rows, com- 
pletely cleaning the middles of all foul 
growth. As often as re(iuired to keep 
down grass, until the Alfalfa is large 
enough to cut, the Matthews' Hand 
Cultivator is passed between the rows. 

Alfalfa re(piires three years to reach 
perfection, but even the first year the 
yield is larger than most forage plants, 
and after the second it is enormous. 
The land must, however, be made rich 
at first ; a top-dressing every three years 
is all that will thereafter be required. 
The seed must be very lightly covered, 
and should be rolled, or brushed in, if 
not sowed with a Matthews' Seed Sower. 

Whenever the plant is in bloom it 
must be cut; for, if the seed be left to 
mature, the stems become hard and 
woody. Also whenever it turns yellow, 
no matter at what age, it must be cut 
or mowed ; for the yellow color showg 
the presence of some disease, or the work 
of some small insect, both of which 
seems to be remedied by mowing 
promptly. My experience leads me to 
the conclusion that fully five tons of 
cured hay per acre may be counted on 
if proper attention be given to deep 
plowing, subsoiling, fertilizing and 
cleanliness of the soil. These things 
are indispensable, and without them no 
one need attempt to cultivate Alfalfa. 

In conclusion, I will remark that I 
have tried the Lucerne seed imported 
by you from France, side by side with 
the Alfalfa seed sent me by Trumbull 
& Co., of San Francisco, and I cannot 
see the slightest difference in appear- 
ance, character, quantity or quality of 
yield, or hardiness. They are identical ; 
both have germinated equally well, that 
is to say, perfectly. 

In closing, I cannot do better than re- 
fer you to the little treatise of Mr. C. W. 
Howard, entitled : "A Manual of the 
Grasses and Forage Plants at the 
South." Mr. Howard, among the very 
first to cultivate Lucerne in the South, 
gives it the preference over all other 
forage plants whatever. My experience 
confirms all that Mr. Howard claims for 



130 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



it. Certainly, a plant that lasts a generation is worthy of the bestowal of some time, 
patience and money to realize what a treasure they can secure for themselves. I 
confidently believe that in years from this date the Alfalfa will be generally culti- 
vated throughout the entire South. 

I am, respectfully yours, 

E. M. HUDSON, 

Counsellor at Law, 
20 Carondelet Street, New Orleans. 



JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE. 

This tuber is well known, and has been described by me in my former Almanacs. 
It is used for the table, also for stock feed. It does best in a rich loam ; should be 
planted and cultivated like potatoes. They yield very heavy. 

Price, per bushel, $2,50— per gall., 35 cents. 



DESCRIPTIVE LIST 

— OF 

SOME VARIETIES OF THE SORGHUM FAMILY. 



As a forage i:>lant for early cutting, to 
be fed to stock, I do not think that any- 
thing is equal to the Amber Sorghum, 
such as I have been selling for years, 
imported from Kansas, i^fter several 
cuttings, the branching varieties of 
Sorghum, also called Millo Maize, may 
be preferable, but more so for seed 
than forage.— The Teosinte will give 
more fodder than any of the Sorghums. 
Some varieties not before described and 
rather new here are the following : 
Yellow Millov/ Maize, orYeilow Branch- 
ing Dhouro, grows same as the White 



Branching kind. The only difference 
exists in the size of the seed, which is 
twice the size of the white variety. — It 
is said to be somewhat earlier, seeds 
planted in April will ripen seed in 
July. -On account of its branching habit 
this grain should be planted in four 
or five foot rows, and two to three feet 
in the drill, according to the strength 
of the land, two plants in a hill. The 
cultivation is like corn. 

Price, 15c. per lb ; postage extra, 8c. 
per lb. by mail— 10 lbs. Si. 00 by Express 
or Steamer. 



KAFFIR CORN 



This grain was distributed in small 
quantities from the Georgia State De- 
partment of Agriculture in 1878, and in 
the hands of Dr. J. H. Watkins, of Pal- 
metto, Campbell County, Ga., it has 
been preserved and fully developed. 



and was first brought to public notice 
through him in 1885. The seed offered 
for sale is from his own growing, the 
genuine and pure stock ; crop of 1888. 

It is a variety of Sorghum, non Sac- 
charine, and distinctly differing in habit 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



131 



of growth and other characteristics from 
all others of that class. The plant is 
low, stocks perfectly erect, the foliage 
is wide, alternating closely on either 
side of the stalks. 

It does not stool from the root, but 
branches from the top joints, producing 
from two to four heads of grain from 
each stalk. The heads are long, narrow 
and perfectly erect, well tilled with white 
grain, which at maturity is slightly 
flecked with red or reddish brown spots. 
Weight, 60 lbs. ])er bushel. 

The average height of growth on good 
strong land, 5h to 6 feet; on thin land, 
4i to 5 feet. The stalk is stout, never 
blown about by winds, never tangles, 
and is always manageable, easily han- 
dled. A boy can gather the grain heads 
or the fodder. The seed heads grow 
from 10 to 12 inches in length, and pro- 
duct of grain on good land easily reaches 
50 to 60 bushels per acre. 

It has the quality common to many 
Sorghums of resisting drought. If the 
growth is checked by want of moisture, 
the plant waits for rain, and then at 
once resumes its processes, and in the 
most disastrous seasons has not failed 
so far to make its crop. On very thin 



and worn lands, it yields paying crops 
of grain and forage, even in dry seasons 
in which corn has utterly failed, on the 
same lands. 

The whole stalk, as well as the blades, 
cures into excellent fodder, and in all 
stages of its growth is available for geen 
feed, cattle, mules and horses being 
e(pially fond of it, and its quality not 
suri)assed by any other known variety. 
If cut down to the ground, two or more 
shoots spring from the root, and the 
growth is thus maintained until checked 
by frost. 

The Kaffir Corn may be planted in the 
latter part of March, or early in Ai)ril. 
It bears earlier planting than other 
Millets or Sorghums. It should be put 
in rows not over three feet apart, even 
on best land, and it bears thicker plant- 
ing than any other variety of Sorghum ; 
should be massed in the drill on good 
land, for either grain or forage purposes, 
and also on thin land, if forage mainly 
is desired. No plant can equal it for 
quality and quantity of grain and forage 
on thin lands. Use 3 to 5 lbs. of seed 
V)er acre. Price of seed, 15c. per lb., 
postage extra, 8c. per lb. by mail ; lots 
of 10 lbs. for $1.00. 



TEOSINTE 

(Eeana luxurians.) 



This is a forage plant from Central 
America. It resembles Indian Corn in 
aspect and vegetation, but produces a 
great number of shoots 3 to 4 yards high ; 
it is perennial, but only in such situa- 
tions where the thermometer does not 
fall below freezing point. Cultivated 
as an annual, it will yield a most abun- 
dant crop of excellent green fodder. 

Considering the Teosinte a superior 
forage plant, the following extract of a 
letter from Mr. Chas. Debremond of 
Thibodeaux, La. , will give additional 
light on the cultivation of same. — Ih 
describing his experience with Teosinte, 
he advises planting the seed in Febru- 
ary, so as to have the plants up early 
in March, as it takes some 14 or 20 days 
for the seed to germinate. He prefers 



planting in rov7s, as giving a heavier 
crop than when in hills; and as its 
growth during the first month is very 
slow, he gives it a good hoeing for its 
first cultivation, using only the plough 
thereafter. 

He also advises cutting the stalks for 
green food when about 4 feet high, and 
s[>ecially recommends cutting them 
close to the ground, as tending to make 
a much heavier second growth than 
when cut higher. His horses, mules 
and cattle eat the stalks with great 
avidity, leaving no part unconsumed, 
and prefer it much to green Indian Corn 
or Sorghum. 

Price, $1.75 per lb. ; 50c. per i lb. ; 20c. 
per oz. Postage prepaid. 



132 



RICHAKD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



LIST OF A FEW VARIETIES OF FRUIT TREES, 

SUITABLE FOR THE^OUTHERN STATES. 

LE COnYe pear. 



This new Southern pear is as vigor- 
ous ill growtli as the China Sand, and is 
an enormous bearer. The fruit is large, 
pale yellow, juicy melting, and of good 
quality, doing better in the South than 
elsewhere. It bears transportation well, 
and commands the highest prices at the 



North. Time of ripening begins about 
the middle of July. So far, this pear 
has never been known to blight. It 
promises to be the pear for the South. 

Rooted one year old trees, 3 to 6 feet 
20 cts. each ; $2.00 per dozen. 4—8 feet, 
25 cts. each ; 12.50 per dozen. 



kieffer's hybrid pear. 



A variety from Philadelphia; a hyb- 
rid between the China Sand and Bart- 
lett, both of which it resembles in wood 
and foliage. It has the vigor and pro- 
ductiveness of its Chinese parents. 
Fruit large and handsome ; bright yel- 
low and red cheek ; flesh tender, juicy 



and well flavored. It comes into bear- 
ing at an early age. Ripens end of 
September, or beginning of October. 

Two year old trees, well branched, 30c. 
each ; $3.00 per doz. ; one year, 20c. each ; 
$2.00 per dozen. 



BARTLETT PEAR 



This well-known variety, one of the 
finest pears in cultivation, has been 
successfully cultivated here ; but occa- 
sionally it has blighted. Since the 
introduction of the LeConte, trials have 
been made with success, that is by 
grafting this, and other fine varieties, 
upon the LeConte; — by so doing, the 
trees are imparted with the vigor of tlie 



latter, growing stronger, and making 
finer and healthier trees. I have a lim- 
ited number of trees, grafted on the 
LeConte Stock, for sale. 

One year old trees, 3 -4 feet, 25 cts. 
each ; $2.50 per dozen. 

Two years old, well branched, 5—6 
feet high, 35c. each ; $3.50 per dozen. 



DUCHESS D'ANGOULEME PEAR. 

Another popular variety which does well in this section.— On LeConte Stock. 
Two years old, well branched, 30c. each ; $3.00 per dozen. 

HOWELL PEAR. 

One of the best for here. Tree is an upright free grower ; it is an early and 
profuse bearer. 

Two years old, on LeConte Stock, 30c. each ; $3.00 per dozen. 

CLAPP'S FAVORITE PEAR. 

A large new pear, resembling the Bartlett ; but does not possess its musky 
flavor. Fine texture; juicy, with a rich, delicate, vinous flavor. It is very pro- 
ductive. On LeConte Stock. 

Two years old, 30c. each ; $3.00 per dozen. 

JEFFERSON PEAR. 

Another blight proof pear, very distinct in habit and growth from other varie- 
ties under cultivation. Cannot be stated yet under what particular type or species 
it should be classed. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



133 



It ripens in Central Mississippi from the 1st— 10th of June, is in the market 
with the earliest peaches, and brings the highest prices. It is above medium size, 
color bright yellow, with a bright, de(^p crimson cheek. It is ripe and marketed 
before LeConte is ready to ship. It is poor in flavor. 

Price, one year old trees, 5- G feet, 30c. each ; $3.00 per dozen. 



WILD GOOSE PLUM. 

A native variety from Tennessee, where it is highly esteemed for market. 
a strong grower; the fruit is large and of good quality. 
Price, 25c. each; $2.50 per dozen, 

MARSANNA PLUM. 



It is 



A new plum from Texas, supposed 
accidental seeding of the Wild Goose. 
It is a rapid grower. Grows from cut- 
tings ; it never throws up any suckers or 
sprouts. Fruit as large, good and hand- 
some as the Wild Goose; one to two 



weeks earlier, hangs on better, ships 
well; ripens and colors beautifully, if 
picked a few days previously. It is 
the best of the Chickasaw type. 

Price, 5—6 feet high, 30c. each; !B3.00 
per dozen. 



KELSEY'S JAPAN PLUM 



The Primus Domestica, or European 
varieties, have proven worthless in the 
South generally. The above will take 
their place promising good results, 
being of Asiatic origin. The Kelsey 
Plum is from two to two and a half 
inches in diameter, heart-shaped, rich 
yellow, with purple cheek. Parties who 
have been fruiting it here in the South, 



pronounce it the most magnificent plum 
they have seen ; it weighs from four to 
six ounces. It excels all other plums 
for canning and drying, and will carry 
for a long distance better than any other 
kind. Matures middle of August to 
September. Do not fail to try it. 
Price, 30c. each ; $3.00 per dozen. 



OGAN AND BOTAN PLUMS 



Two other Japan varieties. They are 
vigorous, handsome growers ; branches 
smooth with rich light green foliage 

The Ogaia is a large yellow variety, 
ripens early, and is very sweet. The 



Botaii is very large, reddish blue ; a 
good keeping and shipping fruit. Japan 
fruit does well here generally; every- 
body should try a few of these plums. 
Price, 30c. each ; S3.00 per dozen. 



APRICOT PLUM 

(PRUNUS SIMONI.) 



A new plum from North China. It 
was fruited for the first time in 1885, by 
T. W. Munson, of Denison, Texas— the 
well-known nurseryman. The fruits, 
when ripening, shine like apples of 
gold, and become of a rich Vermillion 
when ripe. It is very firm and mealy. 



and equal to any Plum ; has never been 
attacked by the Curculio. It will carry 
any desired distance. 

Tree very thrifty, upright; early and 
abundant bearer. 

Price, one year old trees, 50c. each ; 
$5.00 per dozen. 



PEACH TREES. 

I have a fine assortment of Southern grown Trees, selected from the well- 
known Nurseries of Gaines, Coles & Co. They consist of the following varieties, viz : 



134 



RICHARD PROTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



FREE STONES. 



FREE STONES. 



Jessie Kerr. 
AiiisdeBB. 
Alexander. 
Early L.ouise. 
Fleatas St. JToliii. 
]^loiiiitaiBa Rose. 
Foster. 

Crawford's Early. 
AnieHa. 

As they follow in the list they ripen in succession. 

Price, 25c. each ; $2.50 per dozen. 



Stuiup the llVorld. 
TlBwrber. 
Old Mfflxon. 
Crawford's Eate. 
Sinoek. 

Picquet's Late. 
Eady Parliain. 



CLING STONES. 

Oeoieral Eee. 

Stonewall Jackson. 

Old Mixon. 

Eemon. 

fleatli. 

Nix ^Vliite Eate. 

Stinson's Octolber. 

B 91 tier. 

CliiBiese. 



JAPAN PERSIMMON. 

This new valuable fruit has been fruited for the last few years. Most varieties 
are of excellent quality ; twice and three times as large as the native kind ; very 
attractive when the fruit is ripe. 

Assorted varieties. Price, 50c. each ; $5.00 per dozen. 



GRAPE VINES. 



Have some selected varieties for the 
ing is a list of them, viz. : 

Champion. Large black, poor 
quality but sells readily, being the ear- 
liest in the market. 

2 years old, 10c. each ; $1.00 per dozen. 

Moore's Early. Large size and 
very early, good for table use. Price, 
25c. each. 

Delaware. Well known. Regarded 
as best American Grape ; it does well in 
the South, with good soil and high cul- 
ture. Price, 20c. each ; $2.00 i3er dozen. 

Croetlae. Light pink; very fine for 
table use. It is the best of the Roger's 
hybrids. Price, 20c. each; $2.00 per 
dozen. 

Triumph. This is a late variety; 
bunches very large, golden when fully 
ripe, fine as best foreign, and sells 
equally well ; melting pulp, small seeds, 
vigorous as Concord, of which it is a 
hybrid seedling. Rarely it rots ; stands 



table, and for making wine. The follow- 
pre-eminently at the head as a late 
table grape. Price, 25c. each. 

Norton's Virginia. An unfailing, 
never rotting, red wine grape of fine 
quality. Price, 20c. each ; $2:00 per 
dozen. 

Cynthiana. Very much like the 
latter; same price. 

Concord. Early; very popular; 
good for market. Some years it rots. 
10c. each ; $1.00 per dozen. 

Ives. Ripens with the Concord. 
Good for wine ; vigorous and productive. 
15c. each ; $1.50 per dozen. 

Herhesnont (McKee). A most pop- 
ular and successful red or purple grape 
in the south ; excellent for table or wine. 
McKee is identical with it. 

Price, 20c. each; $2.00 per dozen. 

Prices for other Nursery Stock will be 
given on ap])iicatJon. 



CELESTE OR CELESTIAL FIG 



I have only a limited supi^ly of one 
year old trees of this variety. They 
have been raised from cuttings in a 
sandy loam ; are well rooted, and raised 
to a single stem ; not in sprouts, as is 



often the case, when raised from suckers 
taken off from old trees. 

The cultivation of this fruit has rather 
been neglected, which should not be so, 
as the fig is always a sure crop, with 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



135 



very little attention. It has couimeuced 
to be an article of eornmeree, wlien 
preserved ; sliii>ped from here it sells 
quite readily North, put up in that way. 
The Celeste is the best for that purpose, 
not liable to sour like the yellow skinned 



varieties, and sweeter than other dark 
skinned kinds. 

Price, 20c. each ; $2.00 per doz. ; packed 
and delivered on steamboat, or R. li. 
depot. 

IVBiile Msirseillcs and Lemon, 
both early. Price, 25c, each. 



SUCKER STATE STRAWBERRY. 



We have various sorts of soil in Louis- 
iana, and the Strawberry suitable to and 
succeeding equally well in poor or rich 
land, can only be determined by prac- 
tical experiment. 

There are but few varieties which 
adapt themselves to all soils and lati- 
tudes, hence the im})ortance of planting 
those which experienced fruit growers 
have tested and found profitable. A 
Strawberry having all the good qualities, 
has not, and perhap>s never will be 
discovered ; still in choosing, it is well 
to purchase plants having as many good 



points as possible. This I claim for the 
Sucker State. 

It is bisexual ; having both, stamens 
and pistils perfect. The foliage is very 
heavy, protecting the fruit from beating 
rains and hot sun. It is very prolific, 
large size, good quality, and cone 
shaped. Color bright red, very attrac- 
tive, and in addition will shi]> well. 
I offer this variety al" the following 
prices. 

60c. per 100, *5.00 per 1000. 

Have other varieties, IFi/.so///.s Alhany, 
FlncJi's Seedling, etc., at same i)rice. 



LOUISIANA SOFT SHELL PECANS 



This is a variety of nuts which only 
grows South,- and is a sure crop here. 
Those who planted Orange trees twenty 
years ago, lost most of their labor in 
January, 1886, when seven-eighths of 
trees were killed by the severity of the 
weather. If Pecan trees had been 
planted instead, they would have 
brought a handsome income, and con- 
tinued to increase every year in their 



production, furnishing a never failing 
crop for a whole century. 

What I offer are of the choicest 
quality, 75c. per pound ; large roundish 
paper shell ; another good quality of 
long shape, 60c. and 50c. per pound. I 
also have good sized pecans at 40c. per 
pound; if sent by mail 8c. per pound 
postage must be added. 



EXTRA CLEANED BIRD SEED. 

I make a specialty to put up choice re-cleaned bird seed in cartoons holding 
one pound. These cartoons contain a mixture of 

SICILY CANARY, 
HEMP, 

GERMAN RAPE, 

AND GERMAN MILLET, 

all re-cleaned and of liest quality. 

Have also plajn Canary ]>ut up in same way, one i)ound cartoons ; ihi.s is of the 
very tiest quality and also re-cleaned. 

Price, 10c. x)er cartoon ; 3 cartoons, 25c. 

Have also in bulk, the above as well as Hemp and Rape. 

Cuttle Fish Bone, 5c. a piece; 50c. a pound. 



136 



RICHAED FROTSCHER's ALMAXAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



NOVELTIES FOR 1889, 

AND SOME VARIETIES OF SEED OF SPECIAL MERIT. 





Osage Musk Melon. 



]Ve\v\^ ater ?Ieloii, ^'Seminole.** 

The above Melon ha? been originated 
by W. M. Girardeau, of Monticello, 
Fla. He describes the same as being 
oblong in shape, smooth, and beauti- 
fulh' proportioned. It is of two colors, 
gray and light green ; the latter seems 
to be just a darker coloring of the 
former, the gray color greatly pre- 
dominates. Melons of both colors are 
exactly the same in shape, size, color of 
seed, and flavor. 

It is exti^a early, extra large, enor- 
mou.<ly jrroductive, anJ of most delicious 
jiaror. It is in all respects a perfect 
melon. 

Price, 10c. per package ; 20c. per oz. ; 
per 4 lb., 60c. ; per lb., s'2.00. 

The Osage ITIusk 3IeIoii. This 
new Melon has been only two years in 
the Chicago Market, but has become 
the favorite sort in nearly all the leading 
hotels and restaurants. It is small and 
slightly netted, but of exquisite fine 
flavor. The seed I offer is of the genulDe 



FOR THE S0UTHP:RN STATEH. 



137 



stock ; recommend same highly 
for family use. Perhaps when 
grown here, it will get larger. 

Price, per package, 10c. ; i oz,, 
35c. ; 1 oz., 60c. ; i lb., $2.00 ; 1 lb., 
$7.50. 

New Oolden Aii<1iilti8ia 

l¥ax Pole Bean. This Beau 
originated at Andalusia, Bucks 
Co., Pa., with a celebrated bean 
grower. The illustration, made 
from nature, gives some idea of 
their wonderful productiveness. 
The pods are broad, thick, very 
fleshy and entirely stringless, 
and retaining their important 
qualities until almost ripe. The 
pods when fully grown are five 
to six incJies long, rich, buttery, 
and fine flavored when cooked. 
The vines cling well to the Poles. 
They commence to bear when 
quite young, and continue to 
bear profusely for a long time. 
The beans when dry are round 
as a bullet, pure white in color, 
and also make a fine shell or 
winter bean. 

The stock of seed this season 
is so small that I can offer it only 
in packages. 

Price, per package, 15c. ; 4 
packages for 50c. 

TJtorburn's Extra Early Flat 
i?ea»s.— '*Pricle of NeivtoEo." 

The originator of this new 
bush bean says : It is of robust 
growth, with very long, flat pods, 
which are light green. This is 
undoubtedly the earliest and 
most productive bush bean in 
cultivation. The pdants on ac- 
count of their bushy growth. 







138 



RICHARD FKOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



must have plenty of space in the rows ; sown thinly they will produce from forty 
to fifty pods on a plant. 

Price, 15 cts. per packet, containin.^,' about 100 beans. 




Pride of Newton Beau. 



Plilox Druminoiidii Aiba, fl. pi. 

This is really the firet double flowering- 
Phlox introduced. Fully two-thirds of 
the plants raised from this seed will give 
pure double white flowers. They can 
be used for bouquets, at the same time 
they are ornamental in the garden. 
Price, per packet, 20c. 




Phlox Druniondii, alba fl. pi. 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



139 



PLANTER'S & GARDENER'S PRICE-LIST. 



COST OF MAILING SEED. 

Orders for ounces and ten cent papers are mailed free of postage, except 
HeanSf JPeas and Coi'tl, See page -1 in regard to seeds by inaiL On orders 
by the pound and quart an advance of eight cents per pound and ftfteeft 
cents per quart must he added to quotations for posta(/e, 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT. 

On all orders, amounting to $ 5.00 and over, 10 % discount. 

10.01) " 12 

20.00 " 15 

For larger quantities, special prices will be given on application. 
The above discount is on all seeds er^cept Potatoes, Onion Sets, 
tShallotS and Grass Seeds, which are net cash. 



VARIETIES. 



AKTICMOKE. 
Large Green Globe (Loan) 
Early Campania 



ASPARAGUS. 
Conover's Colossal. 



Koots 3 years old 



BEANS— Dwarf, Snap or Biif^li. 

Extra Early Six V/eeks or Newington Wonder. 

Early jMohawk Six Weeks 

Early Yellow Six Weeks 

Dwarf German Wax, (stringless) 

Dwarf Golden Wax . . 

Ward well's Dwarf Kidney Wax 

White Kidney 

Red Speckled French , 

Early China Red Eye 

Red "Kidney 

Best of All 

Improved Valentine 

BEANS— Pole or Ruimliig:. 



5^^ 



Large Lima tn I 

Carolina or Sewee -^ | 

Southern Willow-Leaved Sewee or Butter "^ | 

Horticultural or Wren's Egg ^ i 

Dutch Case Knife ^ I 

German Wax (stringless) g 

Southern Prolitic ^ | 

Crease Back pqM 

Lazy Wife's | 

Golden Wax Flageolet [ 



PRICES. 



Per ounce. 

$0 50 
40 



10 
100 



$0 75 

Per quart. 

$0 20 
20 
20 
25 
25 
40 
20 
20 
20 
20 
25 
20 



r.o 
50 
50 
30 
■?,() 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 



Per I lb. 

$1 75 
1 50 



20 
1000 

lB6l)0~^ 
Per peck 



$1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



25 
25 
50 
50 
25 
25 
25 
1 00 
1 rA) 
1 25 



2 50 
2 50 
2 50 
2 00 
2 00 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 

2 50 

3 00 



Per lb. 

S6 00 
5 00 



20 



Per bnshel 



S4 
4 
4 
5 
6 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
6 
5 



10 00 

10 (10 

10 00 

7 00 

7 00 
9 00 
!i 00 
9 00 

8 00 
10 00 



Prices for larger quantities given on application. 



140 



RICHARD FEOTSCHER S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL. 



VARIETIES. 



Broad Windsor 

BEET. 
Extra Early or Bassano . . 
Simon's Early Red Turnip 

Early Blood Turnip 

Long Blood. 

Half Long Blood ...... 

Egyptian Red Turnip 

Eclipse ....". 

Long Red Mangel Wurzel 

White French or Sugar 

Silver or Swiss Chard . . . 



BOMECOEE or CURLED KAEE. 

Dwarf German Greens 

BROCCOEI. Purple Cape 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 



CABBACJE. 

Earl y York 

Early Large York 

Early Sugar Loaf 

Early Large Oxheart 

Early Winningstadt 

Jersey Wakefield 

Early Flat Dutch 

Early Drumhead. 

Large Flat Brunswick 

Improved Large Late Drnmhead. 
Superior Large Late Flat Dutch.. 

Imi^roved Early Summer 

Red Dutch (for pickling) 

Green Globe Savoy 

Early Dwarf Savoy 

Drumhead Savoy 

St. Denis or Chou Bonneuil 

Excelsior 



CAUEIFEO^VER. 

Extra Early Paris — 

Half Early Paris 

Early Erfurt . . , . . 

LeNormand's Short Stemmed 

Early Italian Giant 

Late Italian Giant 

Imperial . . . 

Algiers (fine) — 

CARROTS. 

Early Scarlet Horn 

Half" Long Scarlet French .. . 

Half Long Lac . . 

Improved Long Orange 

Long Red, v/ithout core 

St. Valerie ... , 

Danver's Intermediate ..,. .. 



CELERY. ; 

Large White Solid (finest American) 

Heart well's Perfection (very tinej short crop. 

Large Ribbed Dwarf 

Tarnii)-R.)oted 

Cutting 



PRICES. 



Per quart. 


Per 


peck. 


Per bushel 


$0 25 


$1 50 


$5 00 


Per ounce 


Pel 


lib. 


Per lb 


$0 10 


$0 


20 


$0 50 


10 




20 


50 


10 




20 


50 


10 




15 


40 


10 




•20 


50 


10 




20 


50 


10 




25 


75 


10 




15 


40 


10 




15 


40 


10 




25 


75 


15 




40 


1 00 


30 


1 


00 


4 00 


25 




75 


3 00 


25 




GO 


2 00 


25 




GO 


2 00 


25 




75 


2 50 


25 




75 


2 50 


25 




75 


2 50 


30 


1 


00 


4 00 


25 




75 


2 50 


25 




75 


2 50 


25 




00 


3 00 


25 




00 


3 00 


25 


1 00 


3 00 


25 




GO 


3 00 


25 




00 


3 00 


25 




60 


2 CO 


25 




60 


2 00 


25 




75 


2 50 


25 




75 . 


2 50 


25 


1 


00 


3-00 


75 


2 50 


10 00 


75 


2 


50 


10 00 


75 


2 


50 


10 00 


1 00 


3 


00 


10 00 


1 00 


3 


00 


12 00 


1 00 


3 


00 


12 00 


1 00 


3 


00 


12 00 


1 00 


3 


00 


12 00 


10 




35 


1 00 


10 




25 


80 


10 




30 


1 00 


10 




25 


80 


10 




30 


1 00 


10 




30 


1 00 


10 




25 


80 


25 




75 


2 50 


•±0 


1 


25 


5 00 


25 




75 


2 50 


30 


1 


00 


4 00 , 


15 




50 


1 50 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



141 



VARIETIKS. 



T-i rfj 



CHERVIL-. 

Plain leaved 

COCLARDS ..... 

COI6N SAJLAD 

COKN. 

Extra Early Dwarf Su.^^ar ; 

Adam's Extra Early ^ 

Early Su^ar or Sweet ^ ^' 

Stowell's Evergreen Sugar 

Golden Beauty 

Cliampion White Pearl t? ^ 

Golden. Dent Gourd Seed '^Z 

Early Yellow Canada ^c2 

Large White Flint . . . ^ -e 

Blunt's Prolific, Field §S 

Improved Learning. El 

Mosby's Prolific ^ 

Hickory King, (White) 

N. B.— Prices for larger quantities given on 
application. 

CRESS. 

Curled or Pepper Grass 

Broad-leaved igrey seeded) 

CUCUMBER. 

Improved Early White Spine 

Long Green White Spine or New Orleans Market 

Early Frame 

Long Green Turkey • 

Early Cluster 

Gherkin, or Burr (for pickling) 

EOGPEANT. 

Large Purple, or New Orleans Market 

Early Dwarf Oval 

ENDIVE. 

Green Curled 

Extra Fine Curled ..... . . .' 

Broad-leaved, or Escarolle 

KOMERABI. 

Early White Vienna 

EEEK. 

Large London Flag, American grown 

Large Carentan " " 

EETTUCE. 

Early Cabbage or White Butter . 

Improved Koyal Cabbage 

Brown Dutch 

Drumhead Cabbage 

White Paris Coss 

Perpignan 

Improved Large Passion 



PRICES. 



Pt;r ounce. 
fO 15 
20 

ir, 

Per (jiiait 
$0 25 

20 

20 

20 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

15 

20 



Per ounce 



MEEON, MUSK or CANTEEOUPE. 

Netted Nutmeg 

Netted Citron 

Pine Apple ... 

Early White Japan 

Persian or Cassaba 

New Orleans Market (true) 



$0 10 
15 



20 
20 
20 



25 



20 
20 
20 
15 
20 
20 
20 



Per ] Ih. 

$0 50 
()5 
50 

Per peek 

$1 25 



1 00 

1 25 

1 25 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

75 

75 

1 00 

1 00 

75 

1 00 



Per \ lb 

$0 35 
60 



25 
50 
25 
30 
25 
75 



2 00 
1 25 



75 
75 

75 



75 



Vex II). 
$1 50 

2 00 

1 50 

Per bushel 
$4 00 

3 00 
-1 00 

4 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

2 50 

2 50 

3 00 
3 00 

2 50 

3 00 



Per lb. 



$1 00 
2 00 



80 

1 25 

80 

1 00 
80 

2 50 



6 00 
4 00 



2 50 

2 50 
2 50 



2 50 



05 


2 00 


1 00 


3 00 


00 


2 00 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


50 


1 50 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


75 


2 50 


35 


1 00 


35 


1 00 


35 


1 00 


40 


1 25 


40 


1 25 


50 


1 50 



1^2 



SICHASD FKOTSCHEE'8 ALMANAC AND GAEDEN MANUAL 



VARIETIES. 



PRICES, 



MELON, WATER. 

-z Oilouniain Sweet -... -. 

X ^. I Mountain Sprout 

't ^ I Ice Cream ("White Seeded) . . 

^ "^ ! Orange 

£ 5- Dark leinsr 

^ ^ ! Rattlesnake • true i 

;;-^ 1 Cuban Queen , 

,5 ? Pride of Georgia 

i I" I 3Iammotli Iron-Clad 

X V- Kolb Gem 

-^ I Florida's Favorite... 

'^ ',Oemler"s Triumph . ... 

MISTARD. 

Large Curled . ... 

Chinese Large Leaved 

White or Yellow Seeded 

XASTlRTlliyi. 

Tall 

Dwart 

OKRA. 

Green Tall Growing 

Dwarf White 

^^ hite Telvet 

03»I03f. 

Large Eed Wethersfield . 

White or Silver Skin 

Creole ■ sold out. new crop ready in Jul: 
ITAEIAN 0\I0:\. 

New Queen 

Bermuda ( triiej . . . . . . 

03riO-\ SET§. 

White - - . ... - . 

Eed or Yellow 

SHAI.I.OTS . 

FARSI.E\. 

Plain Leaved 

Double Curled 

Inaprove'l Garnishing 

PAR5i:^ip. 

Hollow Crown, or Sugar 



PEAS. 

Extra Early. (First and Best) f 

Cleveland's Alaska ® 

Tom Thumb . ^ 

Early Washington t? 

Laxton's Alpha E, 

Bishop's Dwarf Long Pod i 

Champion of England =2 

Carter's Stratagem. ...'%, 

Carter's Telephone , = 

McLean's Ativan eer ^ 

McLean's Little Gem £ ^ 

Laxton's Proline Long Pod "T i 

EuQ-enie lc i 

Dwarf Blue Imperial .^ | 

Eoyal Dwarf Marrow 3 | 

Black-Eye :1 Marrowfat 

Earge White Marrowfat " 

Dwarf Sugar -. 

Tall Sugar : 

American Wonder - 

Field or Cow Peas Market Price. Li 



Per oniice 
SO 10 

10 

10 

15 

15 

10 

10 

15 

10 

15 

15 

40 

10 

10 
05 

20 
25 

10 
10 
10 

20 
30 



25 

20 

Per quart. 



Per ounce. 

10 

10 

15 

10 



Per 

sO 



4 

25 
25 
35 
5(> 



35 
35 
35 
40 
50 
1 50 

25 



50 
75 

20 
20 
25 

75 
1 00 



lb. 



75 
60 

Per peck. 

Market Price. 



Per \ lb. 
25 
25 
35 



25 



Per quart, j Per peck. 



$0 25 
80 
25 

20 
25 
20 
25 
50 
50 
25 
25 
25 
25 
20 
20 
15 
20 
30 
30 
30 



SI 25 



1 50 
1 25 
1 00 
1 50 
1 50 

1 50 

2 50 
2 25 
1 75 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 
1 00 

1 00 

2 00 
2 00 
2 25 



Per lb. 

SO 80 
80 



1 00 



1 00 



5 00 



YD 

75 
40 

2 00 

3 00 

50 
60 
75 

2 50 

3 50 



2 50 

2 00 

Per bushel 



Per lb. 
75 
80 
1 25 



Per bushel 

$5 00 

6 00 

5 00 

4 00 

6 00 

5 00 

5 00 
8 00 
8 00 

6 00 
5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
5 00 
3 50 
3 50 
3 50 
8 00 
8 00 

7 00 



FOR THE SOUTHERN STATES. 



143 



VARIETIES. 



FEFPEK. 

Bell or Bull Nose 

Sweet Spajiish Monstrous 

Long Eed Cayenne 

Red Cherry.. 

Golden Dawn Mango 

Bird Eye 

Tabasco 

Chili 

Ruby King 



PRICES. 



POTATOES. 

Q f Russets . 

Burbank Seedling 

Peerless. 

Early Rose 

\ Extra Early Vermont — 

Early Snowilake 

Early Beauty of Hebron 

White Elephant 

[ Rural Blush 



POTATOES, SWEET. 

Spanish Yam '. . . . 

Shanghai, or California Yam . . . . 

Prices vary according to market, 
given on application, 

PUMPKIN. 

Kentucky Field 



Quotations 



I'or oiuie 
40 

;?() 

40 
30 
50 
50 
50 
50 



Per bushel 
00 
25 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 



$1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Per I 11) 

$1 00 
1 25 
1 00 



25 
00 



1 50 



50 
50 
25 



Large Cheese 

Cashaw Crook-Neck (green striped) southern grown 
Golden Yellow Mammoth .\ . . . 

RADISH. 

Early Long Scarlet ^ 

Early Scarlet Turnip 

Yellow Summer Turnip 

Early Scarlet Olive-Shaped . 

White Summer Turnip 

Scarlet Half Long French 

Scarlet Olive-Shaped, or French Breakfast. 

Black Spanish (Winter) 

Chinese Rose (Winter; 

Chartier 

White Strassburg 

RO^^UETTE 

SAL-SIFY, American .... 

Sandwich Island (Mammoth) ; 

SORISEI., (Broad-leaved 

SPINACH. 

Extra Large-leaved Savoy 

Broad-leaved Flanders 



SQUASH. 

Early Bush, or Patty Pan 

Long Green, or Summer Crook-Neck 

London Yegetable Marrow 

The Hubbard . 

Boston Marrow 

TOMATO. 



Per quart. 
$0 25 
Per ounce. 
$0 10 

10 

20 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
15 
15 
10 
15 
20 
30 
15 

10 
10 



10 
10 
15 
15 
15 



Extra Early Dwarf Red . . . 
Early Large Smooth Red. 



40 
25 
20 



er l)ari( 
■|2 50 
8 00 
3 25 
3 25 
3 50 
3 50 
3 50 
3 50 
3 50 



Per peek. 

$1 50 

Per 1 lb. 

$0 20 

25 

65 

20 

20 
25 
20 
20 
20 
20 
25 
35 
35 
30 
75 
60 
1 00 
50 

20 
20 



25 

50 
50 
50 

25 
75 

65 



Per lb. 

$3 00 
4 00 

3 00 

4 00 
3 00 



4 00 



Per bushel 

$5 00 

Per lb. 

$0 60 

75 

2 00 



50 
60 
80 
60 
60 
60 
60 
80 
00 
00 
00 



1 
1 

1 

2 00 
2 00 
4 00 
1 50 

50 
50 



75 
00 
50 
25 
50 

00 
00 
00 



Ui 



RICHARD FROTSCHER'S ALMANAC AND GARDEN MANUAL 



VARIKTIES. 



TOMATO.— Continued. 

Tilden ... 

Trophy, (selected) ... 

Large Yellow . ., 

Acme 

Paragon 

Livingston's Perfection 
Livingston's .Favorite . 
Livingston's Beauty 



TUR]^IF. 
Early Bed or Pnrpfe Top (strapleaved) 
Early White Flat Dutch (strapleaved) . 

Large White Globe 

White Sj^riLig 

Yellow Aberdeen 

Golden Ball 

Improved Purple Top Ruta Baga . ... 

Munich Early Purple Top .' 

Milan Extra Early Purple Top 

Purple Top Globe 

White Egg ■ . .. .... 



SWEET AN& MEI>I€IWAE IIEKBS. 

Anise . . • • 

Balm 

Basil 

Bene. 

Borage 

Caraway 

Dili 

Fennel 

Lavender 

Marjoram 

Pot Marigold ■ • 

Rosemary 

Rue 

Sage 

Summer Savory 

Thyme 

Wormwood . . 



PRICES. 



GKASS AMI> FIEI.P SEEDS. 

Red Clover 

White Dutch Clover 

Alsike Clover 

Alfalfa or French Lucerne 

Lespedeza or Japan Clover 

Kentucky Blue Grass. (Extra Cleaned) 

Red To}3 Grass ■ 

English Rye Grass — 

Rescue Grass . . 

Johnson Grass. (Extra Cleaned) 

Tall Meadow Oat Grass. 

Meadow Fescue Grass 

Orchard Grass 

Hungarian Grass 

German Millet 

Rye. . 

Barley 

Red or Rust Proof Oats 

Sorghum 

Broom Corn 

Buciiwheat • • • 

Russian Sunflower 

Burr or California Clover (measured) per 

N. B. — Prices for larger quantities given 



Per ounce. 

$0 25 
40 
30 
25 
25 
25 
25 
30 



10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

Per puck. 
$0 10 

1% 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

Per lb. 
|0 15 
25 
20 
20 
30 
15 
10 
10 
25 
15 
20 
20 
20 



Per I lb. 

$0 75 



25 
00 
75 
00 
00 
00 
25 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



Per 1 bu. 



2 50 



Per lb. 

2 50 
4 00 

3 00 

2 50 

3 00 
3 00 

3 00 

4 00 



50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
60 
50 
60 
60 
50 
50 



Market Price, 



10 3 00 

10 3 00 

10 2 50 

10 

quart, 15c. ; per bushel, $3.00. 

on application. 



Per bushel 


$7 50 


12 00 


10 00 


10 00 


5 00 


1 25 


1 25 


1 50 


3 00 


.2 50 


2 50 


3 00 


2 00 



FOR THE SOUTHEllN STATES. 



145 



TESTIMONIALS. 



The following extracts are taken from a few of the many complimentary letters 
received during the ensuing year. This is to convince the public, who have had no 
dealings with my house yet, that 

FROTSCHER'S SEEDS ARE THE BEST FOR THE SDUTI!, 

and have always given the utmost satisfaction. 

It is a gratification for me to receive letters from my patrons, expressing their 
satisfaction, as it is my constant endeavor to please them. 



Amite City, La., June 7, 1888. 
I have just finished digging my potato 
crop. I planted on January 5th two 
barrels of potatoes purchased from you ; 
one of Snowflake and one of Peerless. 
I have dug 60 bbls. of them, all large, 
smooth and white ; they average from 
i to li lbs. S. E. AKERS. 



j St. Andrew's Bay, Fla., Sept. 11, 1888. 
I cannot but speak in the highest terms 
of the seeds that I received from you 
last winter. E. P. KINNEY. 



Bayou Sara, La., July 5, 1888. 
I am very well satisfied with your 
seeds, as they came up well and were 
true to description. The JEarly Summer 
Cabbages were particularly fine, some 
heads weighing as much as 14 lbs., and 
were very uniform in heading. I like 
the Velvet Okra very much. I also have 
the finest Beets, Turnips, Carrots and 
Beans in this neighborhood grown from 
your seed. THOMAS. W. BUTLER. 



Madison Station, Miss., May 22, 1888. 

It affords me much pleasure to assure 
you that your seeds have given perfect 
satisfaction at this place, and think the 
shippers will in future buy their seeds 
from you. P. B. BRIDGES. 

Bermuda Field, near Baton Rouge, La., 
July 11, 1888. 
Will say that the seeds bought of you 
for m:/ spring and summer garden, gave 
the greatest satisfaction. Coming up 
beautifully and in a short time. 

Dr. PETER RANDOLPH. 

Grand Cheniere, La., June 27, 1888. 
I have been using your seeds for the 
past eight years, and consider them 
superior to anv planted before. 

WM. LAITRENTS. 



Sunny Side Farm, near Pensacola, Fla., 

June 12, 1888. 

Since three years we have been using 

your seeds, and have always met with 

success. We must say they have given 

the greatest satisfaction every time. 

Your Garden Manual is one of the best, 

published for the South, and should be 

in the house of every Southern farmer 

and gardener. CLOPTON BEOS., 

Market Gardeners. 

Grand Cheniere, La., January 28, 1888. 
I always v/ant your seeds to plant. 
That is for Southern climate; as I have 
never failed with them yet. With me it 
is Southern seed vs. Northern seed, judg- 
ment in favor of Southern seed always. 
J. A. DOX|,Y. 

Lake Providence, La., April 23, 1888. 
From the 10 bbls. Potatoes ])urchased 
of you I will probably realize 200 bbls; 
all very fine. J. J. ROBINSON. 

Bartow, Fla., February 13, 1888. 
My garden shows your seed up in fine 
shape, and is admired by every one. I 
have the finest Potato patch in Polk Co. 
this season. W. W. MOORE. 

B.\YOU Sara, La., May 29, 1888. 
The ''Red Bust Proof Oats" you sent 
me last fall are fine. I cut a splendid 
crop of them two weeks ago. 

A. T. GASTRELL. 



Camden, AVilcox Co., Ala., July 23, 1888. 

I have usually sent to a northern seed 

house for my turnip seed, but I am so 



146 



RICHARD FROTSCHER's ALMANAC AND GARDEN ilANUAL 



well pleased with the garden seed, which 
I have bought of you for the last two 
years, that I will give your turnip seed 
a trial also. A. G. ERVIN. 



St. Andrews Bay, Fla., Oct. 9, 1888. 
Your seeds give better satisfaction 
than any other sold here; I will send 
you a large order shortly. 

L. M. WAEE. 



Jackson, Miss., Aug. 2, 1888. 
Your seeds have given entire satisfac- 
tion ; have found thern all true to name. 

F. A. yroLFE. 



Beaumont, Tex., January 12, 1888. 
Frotscher's Super ioi^ Flat Dutch Cabbage 
cannot be praised too highly ; notwith- 
standing the bad weather we have had, 
each plant made a head as hard as a 
rock, and weighing from ten to fifteen i 
pounds. It is the best cabbage that was j 
ever grown here. H. W. Joachimi. ; 

Baldwin P. O., La., February 27, 1888. | 

My husband has been using your seeds I 

for many years, and has always been j 

well pleased with them. 1 

Mrs. M. A. De La GEEYE. | 



Union Settlement, La., February 16, 

1888. • 
I was very much pleased with the fruit 
trees that I got from you. 

f Mrs. JENNIE BURTON. 

Patterson, Texas, February 6, 1888. 
I was pleased with the German Millet 
seed that I got from you last Spring; 
it did splendidly. The Extra Early Ver- 
mont Potato is the best of all for this 
section ; the yield is large, from 80 to 90 
bushels per barrel; the Beauty of 
Hebron, also, gives full satisfaction. 

GEORGE BENNER. 

Cottonville, La., January 29, 1888. 
Richard Frotscher, 

New Orleans, La. 
Dear Sir : — 

Your postal card, quoting prices of po- 
tatoes, received. Have received a ship- 
ment of -10 bbls. potatoes marked ''New 
YorJi State Early Bo!<e^/' purchased by 
Messrs. of your city ; but they cer- 
tainly did not buy of you, as was asked 



by me ; because they did not have your 
brand on them, and are so badly mixed, 
of all shapes, colors and kinds, that I 
have concluded to send 20 bbls. back, 
I will keep the other 20 bbls, because 
the most of them were already cut before 
I was aware that they were so good for 

nothing. 1 telegraphed to Messrs. • 

to-night, and wrote them a letter which 
will go with the same mail as this, or- 
dering 20 bbls. Eastern Early Bose from 
B. Frotscher sure," of no one else ; as I 
cannot afford to plant such mixtures 
as they sent before. Please fill the order 
with your best Early Bose, and notify 
me at once. I have had great trouble 
for several years in getting good sound 
seed, true to name, and knowing by six 
years experience, that your garden seeds 
are the best I can buy,' I hope to receive 
as good an article of seed potatoes. 
Respectfullv, 

R. G. BAXTER. 

Gullett's Station, La., February 26, 

1888. 
The seeds that I got from vou, and 
planted, are growing splendidly. I 
will soon have Beets ready for market ; 
my Carrots are large and 'fine ; my Let- 
tuce is beautiful, as is also the Celery, 
and I must say, that I have never seen 
such fine Radishes as I have, grown 
from your seed. Mrs. A. H. STARK. 



Lae:e Charles, La., January 28, 1888. 

I have been using your seeds for the 

past three years, and have found them 

to be better than anv other that I have 

used before. H. D. SUMRALL. 



Tillage Mills, Tex., February 4, 1888. 

The ''Bed Bust Proof Oats'' that I got 

from you, are doing O. K. in spite of the 

blizzard which we have had a short time 

ago. C. E. SMITH. 



Hermitage P. O., La., January 31, 1888. 
Those seeds which I planted, that 
came from you, are "coming up" splen- 
didly, and I am very well satisfied with 



same. 



Dr. W. W. MATHE^YS. 



Troyville p. O., La., January 29, 1888. 
The Turnip seeds of your selection 
last fall, did spendidlv, as did also vour 
other seeds. Mrs. S. J. METCALFE. 



Walker Springs, Ala., March 1, 1888. 
I am very well pleased with your seed, 
are all up and looking fine. 

JNO. F. MURPHY. 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Almanac . 7 to 18 

Apricot Plnm ' 133 

Artichoke 123 

Asparagus 23 

Bartlett Pear 132 

Beans, (Bush) 24 

Beans, (Pole) 24 

Beans, (Dwarf, Snap or Bush) . . 24 to 26 
Beans, (Pole or Running) . . 27 and 28 

Beans, English 28 

Beets 29 to 31 

Bird Seed, 135 

Borecole or Kale 31 

Broccoli . . 31 

Brussels Sprouts 31 

Bulbous Roots ' ... 114 to 116 

Cabbage v 32 to 37 

Cauliflower 35 to 37 

Carrot 36 to 39 

Celery . . 39 and 40 

Celeste, or Celestial Fig 134 

Chervil 40 

Clapp's Favorite Pear. 132 

Collards 40 

Corn Salad 40 

Corn, Indian 41 to 44 

Corn and Seed Planter 120 

Cress 44 

Cucumber 44 to 48 

Climbing Plants 112 to 114 

Directions for Planting 90 to 95 

Duchess D'Angouleme Pear 132 

Eggplant 48 

Endive....;^' 48 and 49 

Flower Seeds 96 to 111 

Garden Implements ... . 121 to 122 

Grape Vines 134 

Grass and Field Seeds 80 to 89 

Herb Seeds " . . 80 

Hot Bed ; 20 

Howell Pear 132 

Japan Lilies 116 to 118 

Japan Persimmon 134 

Jefferson Pear 132 

Jerusalem Artichoke 130 

Kelsey's Japan Plum 133 

Kiefter's Hybrid Pear 132 

Kohlrabi 49 



PAGE. 

Le Conte Pear 132 

Leek 49 

Letter on "Alfalfa" 128 to 130 

Lettuce 50 and 51 

Marianna Plum 133 

Matthews' Hand Cultivator 119 and 120 

Melon, Musk 51 and 52 

Melon, Water 52 to 55 

Mustard 56 

Nasturtium 56 

New York Seed Drill 119 

Novelties 136 to 138 

Ogan and Botan Plum 133 

Okra 56 and 57 

Onion 57 and 58 

Parsley 59 

Parsnip 59 

Peach Trees 133 and 134 

Peas 59 to 63 

Pecans, Louisiana Soft Shell 135 

Pepper ' 63 and 64 

Potatoes 64 to 68 

Pumpkin 68 

Price-List, Planters and Gardeners' 

139 to 144 
Price-List Garden Implements 123 to 127 

Radish 69 and 70 

Remarks on Raising Vegetables for 

Shipping 5 and 6 

Roqnette 70 

Salsify 70 and 71 

Seeds by Mail 4 

Shallots 59 

Sorghum, 130 and 131 

Sorrel 71 

Sowing Seeds 21 

Spinach 71 

Squash 71 and 72 

Sucker State Strawberry 135 

Teosinte . . ., 131 

Testimonials. 118, 138. 145 to 146 

Tobacco Seed 80 

Tomato, 72 to 76 

Turnip 76 to 79 

Table showing Quantity of Seed re- 

jquired to the Acre 22 

Vegetable Garden 19 

Wild Goose Plum 133 



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SEED)^POTATOES^&iCHOICElSEED)^CORN 



j^ sr^nioi^T-iTir. 



My Stock of Seeds is the largest in the South, to 
which I call the attention ot' all in want of fresh and 
reliable Seed. 

Orders respectfully solicited. All communications 
will meet with prompt attention. 




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